INVISION eyewearsalesIf you're like most people, you sometimes struggle to find the right words. Perhaps you always think of the perfect response to a particular situation — a day or two too late.

Of course, it's much easier to say the right thing when you've already anticipated the scenario and come up with a little script in your head.

That's why we created the Line Time feature. The idea is to provide you with just the right words to use at just the right times.

Here are a few of the best lines we've published over the years:

So ... how many pairs of shoes do you own?

This is the perfect question to ask to a fashion-conscious customer who isn’t sure about buying a second (or third or sixth) pair of glasses. Get them thinking about how an eyewear wardrobe would enhance different activities they do, from everyday work to important meetings to sports, nightlife and so on. Talk about the many situations where the client might select a special pair of shoes for an activity or occasion, and present eyewear options they could wear in all those situations.

Source: Dorothy Reynolds, Optical Alternatives, Fairfield, CT

Fortunately, I work miracles!

Say this when a customer comes to you with a problem. First of all, it’s funny. The humor will diffuse the customer’s anger. Second, it’s positive. Last, it’s reassuring.

Source: Scott Ginsberg, aka “That Guy with the Nametag,” strategist and author

Do you have your sunglasses with you so I can give them a tuneup?

It’s a surprising offer to make, a clear signal that your business goes above-and-beyond to keep its customers happy. You can further build your reputation as a professional by explaining what kind of adjustments you’re making and how they will help the client feel more comfortable and see better. No matter how much you’re tempted, don’t try to sell when offering this free service. Doing so would undermine the client’s sense of your generosity. (One exception: If you believe the eyewear is dangerous in some way and that the client urgently needs to upgrade.)

I apologize it seems to be taking me forever.

If you notice that a customer is becoming agitated, upset or restless during a paperwork-filling procedure, this is a good phrase to use to show you understand how he’s feeling. After that, add a phrase of empathy and explanation, like “I understand that this process may seem slow to you, but I’m required by law to compile all this information.”

Source: Renée Evenson, Powerful Phrases for Effective Customer Service

Now that I have your complete attention ...

Say this after you’ve mistakenly crossed two polite words and the result is something less-than-polite. Instead of turning red and hoping no one notices the goof, stop, clear your throat, and use this line. Why? Leveraging an error to help you close the sale requires creativity and chutzpah. In this case, you don’t just make a joke about what went wrong, you actually use it as a reason your customer should buy from you.

Source: Michelle Nichols, savvyselling.com

It’s like blueprints and a building.

Use this line to answer the question of how a progressive lens can work in a small frame as well as a large one. Just about everyone seems to understand the concept of scale.

Source: Siobhan Burns, The Eyeglass Lass, New London, CT

I don't know, what do you think?

An employee comes to you for advice on an issue. Don’t simply solve his problem using your experience and knowledge. Instead, use this line. This answer doesn’t show weakness or ignorance. It demonstrates your eagerness for your employees to think on their own.

Source: Jeffrey Fox, author, How to Become a Great Boss

(Name), you’re in luck!

A client calls and asks for an immediate appointment. And you just can’t do it. Instead of saying, "Sorry, you can’t come in until Friday. We’re booked solid until then," use this line. Then add: "I just happen to have a spot open on Friday." It’s the same message — delivered in a much different language. And the end result is a much more positive feeling.

Source: Jeffrey Gitomer, Customer Satisfaction Is Worthless, Customer Loyalty Is Priceless

Hey, what do you want to try on?

A customer approaches your frame selection, looking uncertain and timid. Wait a minute or so, then approach and say this. establishes a playful tone and makes your inventory seem less intimidating. You want your customers to try on lots and lots of eyewear, and discover — with your help — the favorite frames they’ve ever owned.”

Source: Renee Evenson, Powerful Phrases for Effective Customer Service: Over 700 Ready-to-Use Phrases and Scripts That Really Get Results

It’s a problem with the pressure in the eye being too high. Either the faucet is on too high or the drain isn’t working right.

Use this to help patients understand what glaucoma is and whether you’re treating the faucet, the drain, or both.

Source: Dr. Blake Hutto, Family Vision Care, Alma, GA

You wouldn’t wear the same underwear for a month, why do you wear the same contacts?

Say this to promote the proper use of daily contact lenses. 

Source: Michelle Wright, DePoe Eye Center, Sharpsburg, GA

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