Yes: 13%

  • We do charge, upon next visit, because we know that if we send them a bill, we will probably never see them again. I’d say, 99.9 percent of our patients don’t resist paying our missed appointment fee, because we have “groomed” them over the years to understand the value of the doctor’s time. The only time we don’t charge is in case of illness or an emergency (for the patient). David W., Dallas, TX
  • We will charge a no-show fee if it’s a family that is taking up more than one spot. We find by telling them this up front they almost never no-show. The other patients get two strikes and you’re out. We’re in a small town and feel a little harsh charging a no-show fee and it is not considered a no-show if they are sick or there is a death in the family. Tanya R., Dahlonega, GA 

No: 87%

  • No-show fees engender long-term resentment. It’s better to file the no-show losses under the cost of doing business. It goes without saying that we make reminder calls and tell the worst offenders that we can no longer provide services. Paul L., Greensboro, NC
  • We are new so it really hasn’t been a problem yet. Sometimes, if they are constantly no-showing then something is going on in their life that they have no control over and we like to show some compassion. When these folks do finally come in, they could be your best patient … you never know. Katie M., Springfield, MO
  • We’re afraid to alienate patients and afraid of what they might say to others or on social media. (Even if they no-show without any good reason after being confirmed.) Rick P., Clinton, NY

This article originally appeared in the May 2017 edition of INVISION.



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