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A Compensated Lens Design Tripped Up This Eye Doc

The patient wants his glasses and exam refunded.

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IT WAS A BRIGHT SATURDAY morning in Baltimore and Dr. Garcia’s optician Elena was engrossed in auditing last month’s lab bills. Ten months ago she had been recruited from a bank teller position by Dr. Garcia. His previous optician had quit unexpectedly, and after a month of trying to hire someone with experience, the optometrist trained Elena himself.

ABOUT REAL DEAL

Real Deal scenarios are inspired by true stories but are changed to sharpen the dilemmas involved and should not be confused with real people or places. Responses are peer-sourced opinions and are not a substitute for professional legal advice. Please contact your attorney if you have any questions about an employee or customer situation in your own business.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

NATALIE TAYLOR is owner of Artisan Eyewear in Meredith, NH. She offers regional private practice consulting and ABO/COPE approved presentations. Email her at [email protected]

Dr. Garcia interrupted her concentration with a patient hand-off. “Elena, you may remember Victor, he had an exam a month ago,” he said. Victor and Elena nodded to each other in recognition. “Well, Victor had his glasses made down near D.C. and they aren’t right.”

Victor handed Elena his spectacles: progressives in a drill mount frame. “I just picked them up yesterday. Since I live closer to you guys, and you did the exam, I thought I should have you check them.” He threw his hands up in exasperation and added,

“I just can’t drive in them!”

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Elena cradled the frame. “Let me read the lenses, I’ll be right back!” Victor sat down at the dispensing table and Dr. Garcia followed the optician into the lab.

“I checked them already,” said Dr. Garcia quietly. “They’re off — the left lens in particular is 12 degrees off-axis, and the right lens has cylinder even though I didn’t prescribe any. Look at the add power — I wrote for 2.50, but they made a 2.44 and a 2.45. What the heck is that?!”

Elena gave Dr. Garcia a look of shock. “What should we do?” she asked.

Dr. Garcia squinted through a few thoughts before grabbing the frame from the lensometer.

“Follow me,” he instructed, heading back to his patient.

“Victor, these lenses aren’t what I prescribed,” confirmed Dr. Garcia. “You can go back and tell them to make them again, but if I were you I’d ask for a refund and get your glasses made here.”

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Victor frowned. “Fine, I’ll get a refund the next time I’m in D.C. I just want glasses I can use,” he said.

Elena helped him find a flattering acetate frame, took his measurements and promised a quick turnaround. Dr. Garcia took the job directly to the local lab before work on Monday, and on Wednesday afternoon the patient, delighted, picked them up.

The following Wednesday evening, Victor was back again. Dr. Garcia was with patients, but he found Elena in the lab.

“I took these glasses back to the place I got them from, told them you said they were made wrong and asked for a refund,” he recounted. “The owner drew on them with a marker and spent about 15 minutes bending them, and then I saw great. He said if you guys think they were made wrong, you shouldn’t be in the eyeglasses business!” Elena’s face flushed and her eyes started to burn. “I obviously want to return the pair you made me, as I don’t need or want two pairs of glasses. Frankly, I see better with the other pair anyway.”

“I’m so sorry about that,” stammered Elena. “Dr. Garcia approves our refunds and the bookkeeper issues the money.”

“Fine, here are the glasses,” he said, handing her a beat-up gift bag. “I expect that recheck visit to be refunded too. Completely ridiculous,” he muttered, and stormed out.

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The Big Questions

  • Dr. Garcia is clearly unfamiliar with compensated lens designs. Is there anything anyone could have done better in this situation?
  • Elena now has a returned frame that has been worn a week. Should it go back on the board for resale?
  • Victor is insisting his recheck fee of $50 be refunded. How should Dr. Garcia proceed?

Expanded Real Deal Responses

Rachael D.
Burlingame, CA

I find these situations very tricky. You don’t want to call out the doctor or make any accusations and potentially ruin a business relationship. Assigning blame doesn’t necessarily instill confidence in a patient or client either. I would have printed out the compensated lens Rx and discussed that with the doctor and patient. The numbers game can be very deceiving. I would have encouraged the doctor to contact us to discuss her findings before making statements that may not be true. I would afford her the very same professional courtesy. There shouldn’t be a fee for a recheck if she did the original exam. The frame gets donated.

Manuel L.
Midland, TX

Dr. Garcia should have checked the glasses on the patient’s face, made proper adjustments, tried to bend the axis maybe 2 or 3 degrees, and probably could have made the Rx work. He never should have charged $50 for a recheck. That should have been considered a bit of professional service gratitude.

Taylor K.
Ellington, CT

1. Dr. Garcia should have had Elena contact the fabricating location and learn more about the lenses. Elena could recommend to the dispensing location the doctor’s suggestions to address the patient’s issues before encouraging the patient to order a new pair. We would never force a new pair on a patient unless it was their idea, and we would emphasize that we do not return orders.

2. Elena will need to assess the wear on the frame. If it is in great condition. then clean it, add new demo lenses, and put it back on the board. Otherwise, return it under warranty.

3. I would advise the patient that because there was not an issue with the prescription, they are responsible for the re-check fee. I let the patient know for future reference that had our office made the glasses or there was an error in the prescription, then there would be no charge. The dispensing office’s errors do not constitute free chair time for a patient that is not loyal to the practice.

Yen N.Dallas, TX

Digital or high index lenses have been known to cause a compensated Rx. Not knowing the difference, since he may not be knowledgeable about that, the doctor probably assumed they were made incorrectly. (I know this from personal experience.)

Knowing all lens possibilities in this industry — whether doctor or optician — is vital so that there are more reasonable conclusions for the guest. Ask more questions about what the client purchased, and what type of specific vision issues could be ruled out by adjustments. The frame could be marked down, with the next customer being informed that they were a frame worn and returned within a week. But get it cleaned and polished by the lab before putting it back on the shelf. If your business does not do that then request an RA if possible. The recheck fee should definitely be returned. The client should not have to pay for something that did not benefit him. A lost customer is not worth the $50 in the end.

Leisa L.
Newport Beach, CA

Before Dr. Garcia and his optician suggested returning the drill mount glasses, there should have been more communication with the patient regarding the actual areas where his vision was not comfortable. Adjustments could have been made by Dr. Garcia’s office staff to correct the problems. The patient was charged a recheck fee, which is questionable considering the original Rx was done by Dr. Garcia. The end result would have been a better relationship between Dr. Garcia’s office and the patient.

Yvette R.
Cincinnati, OH

Adjustment should be an additional consideration when a patient says that he cannot see. Dr. Garcia would benefit from a continuing education class on digital lenses and position of wear. He needs to arrange for Elena to receive training from a lab rep. Elena could ask Dr. Garcia if the extra pair of glasses could be given to the angry patient as a back-up pair and a gesture of apology. I would refund his re-check fee as well, and hope that he returns for his routine exams.

Bob S.
Pinellas Park, FL

Both the doctor and Elena need to get up to date on lens technology. They need to request help from a lens rep and take some CE courses on the subject. If the frame is not damaged it could be sanitized and go back on the board. His recheck fee should be refunded since it was unnecessary.

Charley A.
Hurst, TX

Cut your losses. Refund all fees subsequent to the initial exam. No one said the “glasses were made wrong,” just that they did not appear to be made to prescription. Confirming the patient’s understanding regarding the follow-up exam and the refund/remake policy regarding the second pair or glasses might have helped. The patient will not remain happy. Be on alert for his return.

Rigo L.
Indio, CA

Let me start by saying this is a rookie mistake by Dr. Garcia. Doctors should never talk money with patients and more so, never recommend patients to return/refund glasses and get them at their office. Elena didn’t do anything wrong; she is not an optician, she is learning the business. We all hate when patients get glasses elsewhere and want us to figure out what is wrong, but the best way to handle this is by sending them back and having the office who made them figure out what is wrong. There was no reason for Dr. Garcia to do an Rx recheck. Even if the glasses were made wrong, they should have been remade correctly before any recheck. Nobody likes the idea of wearing a used frame, but in small optical shops and in cases like these, they are not going to take a loss on a frame. Compensated Rxs are not something new; by now everyone should be familiarized with digital lenses. This looks like a lose-lose situation: lose money and a patient.

Maureen G.
Oak Park, IL

Dr. Garcia clearly needs some CE classes. At the very least get your lab reps in to talk about the latest digital designs and compensated Rx. He should also have Elena go to classes; joining a group such as PECCA would help immensely. If the frame is in usable condition, you can discount it and be upfront about prior wear and definitely refund his money.

Andrews, MD
Hurst, TX

Cut your losses. Refund all fees subsequent to the initial exam. No one said the “glasses were made wrong,” just that they did not appear to be made to prescription. Confirming the patient’s understanding regarding the follow-up exam and the refund/remake policy regarding the second pair or glasses might have helped. The patient will not remain happy. Be on alert for his return.

Stewart G.
San Francisco, CA

1 The only thing I can think of is perhaps calling the place where the patient originally bought the glasses and discuss the issues.

2. I’m uncomfortable with that, but offices will do that.

3. It depends on whether or not the Rx was changed radically in the first place. I wouldn’t have charged him in the first place if the prescription had not changed significantly. I would only have done the recheck if the Rx had changed.

We have a case here of the blind leading the blind. This professional doesn’t know about these lenses and he’s teaching a novice about things he doesn’t even know? OMG!

Judy C.
Virginia Beach, VA

I learned years ago that you can’t make yourself look better by trying to make someone else look bad. The first move should have been for Elena to call the office where the glasses were made and ask for all the pertinent information, letting them know that their mutual patient was unhappy. Simply relying on a neutralization is not enough. Checking the adjustment of the frame should have been the second move. Finally, there is no excuse for not knowing about current lens technology. Education is available from multiple sources and in multiple modalities.

Rick R.
Girard, PA

1. For one thing Dr. Garcia should have never told Victor to return the glasses for a refund and purchase them at his office. I wouldn’t be happy with either office. If the office where he purchased the glasses had to spend 15 minutes “bending them” I certainly wouldn’t be feeling too comfortable. Especially drill mounts.

2. If the frame was still in good condition, I’d put it back on the board at a reduced price.

3. Dr. Garcia should give back the recheck fee. Clearly (no pun intended) he was in the wrong.

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Natalie Taylor is an experienced optometry practice manager for Advanced Care Vision Network and a consultant with Taylor Vision. Learn more at tayloreye.com.

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