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A Few Simple Words Can Bring Tons of New Patients Through Your Door

A good CTA will keep your office phone ringing, fill up your appointment calendar and turn your website visitors into new patients.

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HERE’S A RIDDLE for you: What can be as simple as two words but is the key to bringing new patients through your door?

The answer: a call to action or CTA.

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A good CTA will keep your office phone ringing, fill up your appointment calendar and turn your website visitors into new patients. So what exactly is this magic little phrase, and what makes a good one?

What is a CTA?

A CTA is phrase that instructs or encourages a user to take a specific action, such as booking an appointment, signing up to a mailing list, calling the office, filling in a form or getting more information about a promotion. It can (and should) be used in basically any form of marketing, such as your website, a landing page, a Facebook promotion, an email or even a radio ad.

Each element of your marketing is designed for one ultimate purpose — to bring in appointments and optical sales. If you fail to include a CTA, you risk losing potential patients who may delay or not otherwise take the next step toward that goal. Making the call to your office or action easy and quick reduces lag time and dropoff rates.

What makes a good CTA?

A good call to action makes it clear what action you want visitors to take and gives them the tools they need to do so. The best CTAs address the what, when and why of taking the next step and usually have the following traits:

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  • What: They use action verbs to direct conversion such as, “Call our office, Fill-out an appointment form, Book an appointment, Contact us, Visit our office etc…” The best CTAs are those that include the words that would follow the phrase, “I would like to …”
  • When: They use time-sensitive wording such as, “Today, Now, Don’t Delay etc.”
  • Why: They are often benefits-oriented, answering the question of why one should take the action. “Take care of your precious eyesight, Save time and money, etc.”
  • They stand out on the page using bright colors and bold text. They are clear and easy to spot, and they are most effective when placed in the header and/or at least above the fold. They should also show up prominently on both desktop and mobile devices. And in case you’re wondering, we’ve seen that circle buttons stand out more and work better than rectangles.
  • They are easy to use. Nowadays clickable buttons, especially on mobile-friendly sites, are the way to go. If your visitor can click a CTA button on your site and schedule an appointment or call your office directly, you’ve eliminated almost every obstacle. What could be easier? Our marketing experts recommend a CTA attached to an embedded online scheduler when possible, allowing patients to instantly see your availability and book an appointment.

Now here’s one catch: There is such a thing as too many CTAs on a page. You don’t want to overdo it. Top, bottom and once in the middle is “enough.” In that case, the CTAs are easily accessible get the job done. Anything more starts to turn off the visitor.

So the next time you are working on your website or scheduling a new promotion, stop and think about your CTAs. They are probably the most important part of your marketing or campaign strategy.

Zvi Pardes is the Head of content marketing at EyeCarePro, which provides ECPs with educational content that helps them advance their practices through technology, management strategies and digital marketing. EyeCarePro serves both industry and practices and is the only company of its kind solely focused on the optometric space. Contact him at zvi@eyecarepro.net.

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Danielle Richardson

Mindful Meditation for You and Your Patients

Studies show it can cure many chronic pain and anxiety conditions … even treat glaucoma!

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MINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION ARE two words whose meanings depend on who you ask. So what is mindfulness meditation? Is it sitting still on a yoga mat? Is it repeating mantras in the Himalayan Mountains? Is it something totally different?

The answer is (drum roll please) … Yes! It is all those things and more. It is the practice of intentional, nonjudgmental awareness of moment-to-moment experiences, as defined by Dr. Dan Siegel, founding co-director of UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Research Center.

While this type of practice seems like a way of improving your mental health, the benefits extend to your physical self as well. The Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) technique was created in the 1970s by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, a professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Since then, the Center for Mindfulness at the UMass Medical School has found success curing many chronic pain and anxiety conditions with mindfulness meditation.

More recently, a study published in the Journal of Glaucoma revealed this same MBSR meditation technique as an effective treatment for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) when used over a 21-day period. The randomized study included 90 POAG patients and found the patients who meditated not only had lower intraocular pressure, but also significantly lower levels of the stress hormone Cortisol when compared to the control group. It’s time to consider beginning a mindfulness meditation practice of your own and perhaps making the recommendation to your patients.

I wholeheartedly believe in the power of meditation but don’t take my word for it, give it a try for yourself via one of the methods below.

Video-Based Guided Meditation

A quick search for the keywords ‘guided meditation’ will yield a treasure trove of resources and online videos. If you’re feeling overwhelmed with all the results, I recommend starting with Dr. Dan Siegel’s guided mindfulness meditation.

App-Based Guided Meditation

Mobile applications like Headspace, Calm, and Omvana put the power of meditation in your pocket. You’re able to turn idle time into a chance to reconnect with yourself. Oprah and Deepak Chopra also have a “21-Day Meditation Experience” app focused on helping beginners develop a foundation.

IRL (In Real Life) Options

Many local yoga studios or healing centers offer meditation classes. Although these classes may lean towards the spiritual elements of meditation, they often provide an opportunity to receive in-person guided meditation in a space that’s welcoming and inviting. Additionally, mindful awareness practices like yoga, tai chi, and qi gong are effective in helping you achieve many of the same awareness benefits with a bit more movement.

Whether you choose to attend a yoga class, download an app, or watch a YouTube video — building a regular meditation practice can help you become mindful, improve focus, reduce stress, and achieve greater well-being. Happy meditating!

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John Marvin

Success is Only the Top of the Iceberg

To navigate your own future, you need to look below the surface.

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THERE’S A POPULAR image of an iceberg that you may have seen. The top of the iceberg, the portion above water, is titled success. This portrays what everyone sees about something successful. Underneath the surface is the much larger portion of the iceberg and it is titled hard work, late nights, persistence, rejections, sacrifices, discipline, criticism, doubts, failure, risks. These are the actions, behaviors and decisions your success is actually built upon that few people realize or acknowledge.

Opening a start-up practice is something our organization specializes in. With the experience of opening what will be 70 new offices by year end, I feel qualified to speak on what it takes for a new practice to succeed. It doesn’t include magic, luck or “secrets.” What it takes is everything under the surface of the iceberg. For a young doctor, there are important reasons to embrace what lies beneath the surface.

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Well-known teacher of achievement principles Jim Rohn says, “Success is not something you pursue but rather something you attract by the person you become.” The value of embracing everything that lies beneath the surface is that the process creates experience and experience produces personal growth … that, in turn attracts success.

Without the growth that results from sacrifice, enduring criticism and taking risks, you can’t understand how to produce a successful outcome. Without working Saturdays, late nights, being persistent and experiencing setbacks, you do not know the value of inconvenience nor the pride of accomplishment.

Owning an eyecare business is not for everyone. If you don’t have the passion and deep desire for ownership, to produce your own income, and have control over the patients’ experience, then it is best if you work to help someone else build their practice. To be successful at ownership, you have to have a passion for what you do. If you do not have passion, you’ll quit. Building anything of value and especially building a private practice is hard and requires work. There are constant challenges with staff, managing expenses and dealing with regulations. If you don’t have a love for what you do and understand in your core why you are doing it, you will not be successful.

However, if you do have this passion, know why you work so hard to overcome challenges, and you take full responsibility for the success of your practice, the reward of ownership and the pride of accomplishment is unlike anything experienced by those who work for someone else. That is why they only see the top of the iceberg and not what lies beneath the surface. They attribute your success to luck, to being in the right location at the right time, or something else that demonstrates they do not understand the work that went into the achievement.

I visit often with an optometrist who is interested in opening their own practice and they have become consumed with analyzing demographics, competition in an area, household incomes and other factors they consider critical to their success. While consideration of these items is important, they have failed to consider the most important factor — their own determination and commitment to personal growth.

When you are deciding to start your own practice, you are the captain of the ship. It is your responsibility to navigate your own future, to overcome, endure and grow from what lies beneath the surface.

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This Healthy Vision Month Dig Deeper into Children’s Vision Issues

Our eyes look, but our brain sees and sometimes for kids there is a disconnect between the two.

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AS WE REFLECT ON Healthy Vision Month, let’s consider the following: There are 1.3 billion people living with some form of vision impairment, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). About 80 percent of those impairments are considered avoidable.

The American Optometric Association estimates up to 80 percent of a child’s learning is through vision and 10 percent of children have a vision issue significant enough to impact their learning, according to the College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD).

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Unfortunately, it is not always easy for parents to identify symptoms or impairments in children.

For starters, their kids may not have the vocabulary or awareness to describe what they’re experiencing. One of my granddaughters struggled with her vision until she was prescribed -6.00 lenses. She was two years old. The issue is complicated by the following statistic: nearly two-thirds of children with some kind of vision impairment are also living with at least one developmental disability, according to the CDC. Poor vision can exacerbate the severity of a disability; the latter can sometimes mask the existence of the former.

All of the above underscores the importance of early and regular eye health exams. It also creates opportunities for new kinds of vision therapy, such as Neuro-Visual Training (NVT).

According to Dr. Stelios Nikolakakis, a Canadian optometrist who runs Mind’s Eye Neuro-Visual Optometry in Toronto, NVT goes above and beyond traditional eyecare with a holistic approach to vision health.

Our eyes look, but it is our brain that sees, and any disconnect between the two can create significant learning challenges.

He reminds us that while reading challenges, frustration, and poor grades could be the result of a learning disability, they could also stem from poor communication between their eyes and brain. He also says about 80 percent of the symptoms of someone who needs NVT are identical to the symptoms of someone with ADHD.

As a result, the COVD says typical vision screenings can miss at least half of vision problems.

It is easy for parents and teachers to miss or mistake signs of vision impairment. If a child cannot sit still, is easily distracted, complains of headaches or eyestrain, consistently asks others — including parents — to read to them, or confuses their b’s and d’s, the child could be struggling with underdeveloped visual systems. Rather than dismissing their behavior or complaints, it is critical to consider whether a relatively small amount of training could help address these issues, and ultimately set a child up for success in the classroom and in life.

There are several ways optometrists can help. They can have their recallers book eye health appointments for parents together with their children. They can ask parents whether their kids have demonstrated any of the above behaviors. By learning more about the applications of NVT, and by encouraging patients to do the same, we can start to broaden the scope and impact of Healthy Vision Month by considering the health of all elements of our vision for all ages.

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