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John Marvin

All You Have to Do Is Try One More Time

Failure only happens if you give up.

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THOMAS EDISON ONCE SAID, “Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always trying just one more time.”

It is completely in our control. All we have to do is try one more time. If that doesn’t work, then try one more time. You create your own new beginning.

We often see failure as final, devastating, humiliating and sometimes even a fatal blow to our dreams. Succumbing to this point of view, or dare I say, belief, is an outward demonstration of weakness. Imagine the NBA without

Michael Jordan. Well there would have not been a Michael Jordan if he had believed that failure was devastating and final. In his own words, MJ said, “I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games.

Twenty-six times I’ve been asked to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”

We see the awards, the recognition and notoriety of successful people like Michael Jordan but don’t realize that for every accomplishment recognized, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of instances of failure.

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It is the fear of failure that keeps most people from even trying to accomplish or be successful. Wayne Gretzky, the NHL player nicknamed “The Great One” and considered by many to be the greatest professional hockey player of all time, said, “You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take.” The fear of missing a shot robs us of the success we can have.

What makes this so important is that success in whatever we pursue is not something that might happen, but with understanding that all we have to do is not give up, we can make success a certainty.

So, what holds us back? This little word “fear”.

Fear of some things is good. It protects us. We don’t text and drive for fear of accidents. We don’t put ourselves in harmful circumstances. I live in southeast Texas. When the national hurricane center warns of an impending storm, many who live along the coast evacuate for higher ground due to fear of a dangerous storm. These are all rational fears.

Then there is emotional fear. Fear of speaking in front of a crowd or fear of being rejected when asking the Homecoming Queen on a date. These are less rational and more emotional.

The fear of failure is an emotional fear. We are afraid that we will be embarrassed if we say we are going to do something and are not successful. We are afraid of what others might think and we’ll suffer a loss of self-esteem. Our insecurities take prominence in our imagined world.

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Fear of failure is the behavioral reaction we have when we fill our minds with all of the bad things that will happen if we simply try. It’s paralyzing. We think, nothing ventured nothing lost. When in reality, nothing ventured is nothing gained.

This mindset is deceiving and limits our own potential. We live our lives defensively while others, who take risks, enjoy achievement and success. Sure, some fail, but failure is only a reality when one gives up and quits trying. Barry Bonds, the MLB player with the record for home runs at 762, struck out 1,539 times, more than twice his number of home runs. Bonds knew that each time at the plate was a new beginning and the only way to fail is to stop trying.

John D. Marvin has more than 25 years of experience in the ophthalmic and optometric practice industry. He is the president of Texas State Optical and writes about marketing, management and education at the practiceprinciples.net blog. You can email him at jdmarvin@tso.com.

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John Marvin

A Different Approach for Achieving Your Goals This Year

Only 3 percent of people will take the time and discipline to do this, but they’ll make more than 10 times the 97 percent who didn’t.

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MY FATHER TURNED 90 years old this past August. My relationship with him has changed over the years, but the older I’ve become, the more I appreciate learning from him. He is a voracious reader, and I enjoy hearing about the books he is reading. This past fall, he suggested I read a book he’d just finished and now I’d like to suggest that you do too. It’s called Goals by Brian Tracy.

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Everyone is familiar with the importance of setting goals. This time of year, we are inundated with resolutions and fresh starts. But based on studies, 25 percent of people who make New Year Resolutions don’t even keep them a full seven days. Sixty percent abandon them within six months. Why do we have such difficulty achieving goals?

I’d like to suggest a different approach for reaching your goals this year.

Decide on three things you want to achieve. You can choose one or two if you like, but no more than three. There is power and focus that comes from keeping the list small; it doesn’t allow for distractions. Take time to decide what it is you want. Pretend you have three wishes and be careful how you use them. Deciding what you want is the most challenging part of achieving your goals.

Write Them Down

Write a paragraph, describe it in detail and in the present tense; not “I’m going to …” but “I have” or “I am.” Take time to think through the impact of achieving the goal, be specific and detailed in your description. Writing down what you want to achieve is, in itself, powerful in its ability to help you focus. If you contemplate what the goal will do for you, your family or business, you may decide that it’s not a goal you have a burning desire to achieve. Knowing what you don’t want can be as important as knowing what you do. This only happens when you write down your goals in detail.

Make It Measurable

Describe what you want in terms that are measurable. Stating that you want to make more money is not measurable.

How much more? If you’re going to grow your business revenue, then set an exact percentage. Don’t compare it to the industry; set the amount you want to achieve. Determine whether you wish to increase your gross or your collections. Once completed, there will be no question as to whether or not you achieved your goal.

Set a Date

Setting a date is critical as it drives motivation and helps keep the focus on working daily to achieve your goal. Not only should a date be set for when you will reach your goal, but it should be broken down into months, weeks and days. Every big goal is achieved by reaching a series of daily goals. This gives you a plan. Record in your calendar your daily goal and the result. This daily exercise will keep you focused and provide a visual you can use for motivation.

Sounds simple, right? It is, but studies show that only 3 percent of the people who read this will take the time and discipline to put these simple steps into action. Studies also show that the 3 percent who do will make more than 10 times the money of the 97 percent who didn’t. What you experience in this new year is entirely up to you.

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John Marvin

Forget Opinions, Measure the Hard Facts and Data to Improve Your Business

In the end, it is the least expensive and most productive business tool in your arsenal.

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THERE’S A BUSINESS axiom that says if you want to improve something, measure it. The sheer act of quantifying an issue and then determining how to improve its outcome incrementally, will itself create improvement.

W. Edwards Deming, the father of continuous quality improvement, believed that management decisions should be made using facts and data; and that successful managers use that data to best understand customers and their ever-changing expectations of goods and services.

The contrast is making decisions based on opinion. I believe that this is done far too often by optometrists and managers in our industry and these are the reasons why:

It’s easy. What could be more comfortable than offering your opinion about patients’ preferences and behaviors? In some ways, it just makes sense. You spend all day, several days a week observing people in your practice. Naturally, your opinion is enough on which to base your decisions.

It’s popular. Everyone has an opinion. The dilemma is when team members’ views conflict with one another. Whose opinion is correct? Usually, it defaults to the person with the most authority. When this happens, you can diminish the perspective of others.

It’s cheap. Opinions are free. You don’t need to go to the expense of both time and money to gather facts and data. Why go to all of that time, effort and spend money when your opinion will do the job just fine? However, a decision based on belief and not facts can be the most expensive decision you’ve ever made.

Recently, I was working with a young optometrist to open his first practice, and as you can imagine, he was full of enthusiasm and confidence in his opinions. He had classmates that had started new practices. What could be so difficult?

Of course, he had an opinion about his location. He had already determined where he wanted to open his new office. When I pointed out some of the challenges this selection would create, he wouldn’t be dissuaded. It had everything he believed, in his opinion, that was critical to a successful location.

It was close to where he wanted to live. It was half the price of locations in areas with much higher traffic patterns, and there were no other optometrists within a five-mile area. In his opinion, this location was ideal.

I explained to him that selecting the right location is probably the most critical first step in building a successful practice. That he should consider the households in the area, the exposure that a site will provide his new office, and that is all a part of what you pay for in lease payments. Basing this decision on his opinion is an example of how expensive a wrong decision can be.

Another practice data area that is neglected is the retention of patients. We don’t measure the percentage of patients we saw a year ago that return in twelve months. Why would we? We are great at what we do, why wouldn’t they return?

After all, we sent them a postcard telling them it was time to come back for an appointment.

The office most successful at retaining patients that I know measures and reports to the team each week the percentage of recalled patients who booked an appointment. They have learned that success in this area requires a phone call to follow up on those who do not respond to their postcards, emails, and text messages. The OD/owner is proud that 87.3 percent of their recalled patients return for their annual exam and he is still working on improving this percentage.

Managing your business using facts and data is crucial. It takes the emotions, personal perspectives, and biases out of making improvements. In the end, it is the least expensive and most productive business tool in your arsenal.

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John Marvin

The 4 Key Elements to Building a High Performance Team

It isn’t experience, skills or talent… it’s all in the mindset.

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MANY PEOPLE BELIEVE that the New Zealand All Blacks Rugby team is the greatest team in the history of sports. This means all sports, any team all over the world. They are three time world champions and have a winning percentage of 77 percent over the past 100 years. They have not lost at home in the past 10 years.

What is it that creates a high performance team? It is not merely talent. There are many professional sports teams with a roster full of superstars, but which do not live up to their potential. It is not the money invested in payroll; the New York Yankees have famously spent far more money than other teams but often fall short of even making the playoffs. The 2008 World Series Tampa Bay Rays had the 29th payroll ranking out of 32 teams.

When you break it down, all high-performing teams have certain traits in common:

Shared Leadership

A team that reaches toward its full potential does not rely on one person for leadership. Each member of the team steps up when required to provide leadership. Each member respects the talents and abilities of other team members and follows another when the job requires.

Leadership in difficult situations requires different skills, and a high-performing team recognizes that each member brings their own talents and skills.

An Achievement Mindset

High-performing teams are focused on accomplishment. They are unified toward reaching their goal, be it winning a championship or hitting a sales target. They understand that accomplishment is not a once in a while endeavor, but the result of habits executed consistently each hour of each day. They don’t understand or accept the concept of close enough. Successful teams take the view that either they got the job done or they didn’t. Failure to them is not an option; they figure out a way to make success happen.

Integrity and Respect

High-performing teams believe in the dignity of each team member. They perform their responsibilities with honesty and integrity. They know that cutting corners when offering a service is not good for the customer or the practice. If a mistake has been made, they own it. They don’t make excuses or blame the customer. They truly believe that while the customer isn’t always right, they are always the customer. They do not encourage or tolerate team members who do not live up to the same standards of integrity.

High-performing teams respect each other by listening and considering the views of others. When faced with a challenge, they work together instead of believing that they alone have all the answers. They understand that collaboration among many can produce a better result than the opinion of one individual.

Look for Opportunities

High-performing teams are continually working to improve their skills, their services, their products and their processes for delivery. They foster an environment of continual training, understanding that it is the excellence of consistent execution that delivers to the customer.

They encourage learning of new technology, new products and an ongoing review of how the work flow process can be improved. They don’t believe in “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” To the contrary, they believe that they must break it to see how they can make it better.

Developing a high-performance team requires selecting team members with the right mindset. This mindset is more important than years of optical experience or years in a particular position. The owner or hiring manager’s job, in many ways, is to select the right people, give them direction and then get out of their way.

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