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Entreprenurial OD Launches High-Glam Vision Care Salon

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Dr. Sheena L. Garner inside Eyebar

Dr. Sheena Garner has created a concierge-style practice with gorgeous eyewear in beautiful yet comfy surroundings.

This article originally appeared in the March 2016 edition of INVISION.

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QUICK FACTS

LOCATION: Houston, TX
OWNER: Dr. Sheena L. Garner
OPENED: 2014
AREA: 2,233 square feet
EMPLOYEES: 2 full-time “EYEBARistas” and 5 part-time (including one makeup artist, registered nurse and lash technician).
TOP BRANDS: Paul Smith, Emilio Pucci, Matsuda, Tom Ford, Balenciaga
WEBSITE: eyebarhouston.com
FACEBOOK URL: facebook.com/eyebarhouston
TWITTER HANDLE: twitter.com/drsheenagarner
INSTAGRAM URL: instagram.com/eyebar_houston
PINTEREST URL: pinterest.com/drsheenagarner/eyebar/

The party starts as soon as the lipstick-red Porsche Boxster convertible with license “EYE (heart) DR” pulls in front of a stone cottage in Houston’s tony River Oaks section.

“My car is the ‘we’re open’ sign,” says Dr. Sheena Garner, the owner of EyeBar, a concierge-style eyecare practice and eyewear boutique that’s just over a year old. At EyeBar, clients can get eye exams, Lasik surgery, spectacles and contacts. But the menu also includes services seen far less often at optometry offices: lash and brow extensions, makeup and makeovers, eyebrow waxing and threading — even injections to banish crow’s feet.

“It’s not just an exam. It’s an experience,” says Garner, who schedules just eight appointments daily at EyeBar (versus 16 to 20 at InSight Eyecare, a practice she co-owns in northwest Houston). “Coming here is like therapy,” she adds, and quality time is her No. 1 goal. “It’s time away, and you feel special.”

After their eye exam, people can get their makeup done at no extra charge while Garner picks out frames for them to try on. Frame styling is her favorite part of the business, and a big reason she started EyeBar. After graduating from Texas A&M with a major in biology, she interviewed at Neiman Marcus to be a fashion buyer. “I realized I had two lives, medicine and fashion, and optometry was the only way to marry them,” she recalls.

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Exterior of Eyebar Houston

Eyebar is located in Houston’s posh River Oaks area.

Fashion drives EyeBar’s selection of 450 frames, which retail from $200 to $800 and include Matsuda, Paul Smith, Emilio Pucci and Jacques Marie Mage, as well as Tom Ford, Chloe, Miu Miu and Balenciaga. Frames become art as they jut from clear Plexiglas fixtures on the wall or perch in clear glass cabinets.

Garner designed the white, navy and gold interior, culling ideas from Pinterest and shopping at contemporary furnishings stores. Homey touches include candle-wax-dripping on bottles at the fireplace and faux fur pillows on the sofa. Espresso, mimosas, wine, beer and bowls of Hershey’s kisses offer comfort kicks, and “we bake cookies so the house smells good,” says Garner. Rather than spa music — “It puts me to sleep” — she spins Norah Jones and Coldplay, with the tunes at their liveliest on Fridays.

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EyeBar’s clients are women and men, mostly under 50, often from arty professions. “We’re all chasing our youth, wanting to be fashionable, staying up with trends,” says Garner. The business definitely lives up to its slogan, “A Place to be Seen,” with local TV news talent, fashion models and pro athletes among the clientele.

Famous or not, though, “everyone feels at home,” Garner notes. “Brandon (Brooks, a guard for the Houston Texans) sat on my blue couch watching football as he ate chips and queso.” And kids can watch Netflix movies with milk and cookies, or do their homework at the kitchen table while their parents get exams.

Dr. Garner's license plate

When parked out front, Dr. Garner’s cherry-red Porsche lets patients know the business is open.

Garner chose Houston’s River Oaks area for its gracious homes (many turned into businesses) and reputation for luxury. Yet a week after she signed a lease in 2014, major construction on her street was announced. Major floods last April and May also cut into traffic.

But as the child of entrepreneurial parents, Garner is undeterred. She and EyeBar are building a clientele through word of mouth, creative giveaways (like sno-cones on a scorching National Sunglasses Day last June) and pop-up shopping events with wares from local clothing boutiques carrying Suno, Roksanda and other hip designers. Garner also cultivates a strong social media presence, noting how it’s “a lot of work but worth it.” On Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook and Twitter, she shares beauty tips, inspirational quotes and party photos of her patrons, with the occasional red-carpet shot of Rihanna in Balenciaga shades or James Franco in Ray-Ban Wayfarers.

“I want to give the sense that my customers belong to a club,” she says. That club can include valet service, girls-night-out makeup parties or even an exclusive exam. Garner says, “If you want an after-hours exam and plan to buy something, shoot, I’ll open up for you.”

In fact, Garner plans to open another location, minus the EyeBar trimmings, where she’ll team with a plastic surgeon and obstetrician/gynecologist. (“You can get all your necessary evils in one place,” she says.) Meanwhile, she dreams of attending her first Silmo, too: Art of the Eiffel Tower decorates her office, near a sign reading, “Just sitting here on the corner of awesome and bombdiggity.” Garner’s long days and endless whirl make her realize “I don’t have enough time in the day — and I’m not invincible,” she says. “But I am a dreamer. That keeps me going.”

Eyebar Houston interior

White, gold and navy blue decor and furnishings bring a unified, upscale look to EyeBar.


Five Cool Things About
Eyebar

Dr. Sheena L. Garner of Eyebar

Dr. Sheena Garner is active in local charities.

1. Giving gal: A nominee for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Woman of the Year competition in Houston, Garner also donates to charities including Love Gives Back, CanCare, animal welfare nonprofits and the Alzheimer’s Foundation.

2. Something to talk about: Garner has had perfect vision since Lasik surgery five years ago, but she still sometimes wears glasses as a fashion accessory and conversation starter. “If I wear glasses, 10 more people will talk to me than without them,” she says.

Beauty maintenance is free for Dr. Garner’s staff.

3. Plentiful perks: Working at EyeBar has its benefits: free Botox, makeup and lash extensions as well as monthly spray tan and an annual pair of glasses. “My staff’s beauty maintenance is advertising for me,” Garner says.

4. Makeover heaven: The winner of Viva la Girls Night drawing and her BFF got professional makeovers and champagne at EyeBar followed by dinner at preen-and-be-seen night spot Ruggles Black. “We wanted to bring back college days when best friends would get dressed together and play with their makeup,” Garner says.

5. Handsome times 10: Michael Afshari, a friend’s brother, got an eye exam just to be supportive — and was surprised to learn he needed glasses. When his Montblanc specs arrived, “his reaction was priceless,” Garner says. “He gazed in the mirror and said, ‘I’m not as handsome as I thought.’ Mind you, he’s very attractive.” He now owns 10 pairs.


FINE STORY

SHOWING SOME (SOCCER) STAR POWER

While helping makeup artist Aubrie Layne choose new frames, Dr. Sheena Garner overheard Layne’s pre-teen sons, Max and Hanz Jimenez, admiring a framed story on her kitchen wall about Garner’s good friend and ex-Houston Dynamo soccer player Michael Chabala. So Garner phoned him. “He was there in no time to meet them,” she recalls. “I had to leave to see patients at my other office, but he stayed behind to dribble and sign soccer balls with them in our parking lot.”


FINE FEATURE

PATH TO SUCCESS

Dr. Garner began her vision care career as an optometric assistant to Drs. David Bridges and Donald Norcini at InSight before attending the University of Houston School of Optometry. She ultimately bought Bridges’ half of InSight and continues to work there on Tuesdays, Thursday afternoons and Friday mornings. (She’s at EyeBar on Wednesdays, Saturdays, Thursday mornings and Friday afternoons.) “I still work at that location because I can’t seem to let go of my patients,” she says. “You develop relationships and patients become family.”

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America's Finest

Want to Know What ‘Start-to-Finish’ Service Really Looks Like?

This Fort Worth, TX practice reinvented itself into a boutique optical with high tech examinations.

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Clear Eye Associates + Optical, Fort Worth, TX

OWNER: David Moore, OD; URL: cleareye.com; FOUNDED: 2007; YEAR OPENED FEATURED LOCATION: 2017; ARCHITECT AND DESIGN FIRMS: Norman Ward Architect, EyeDesigns, and Entirely Interiors; EMPLOYEES: 12 full-time, 1 part-time ; AREA: 11,000 sq. ft.; TOP BRANDS: ic! berlin, Rolf, Dita, Barton Perreira, Face à Face; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/ClearEyeOptical; INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/cleareyeoptical; YELP: yelp.com/biz/clear-eye-associates-optical-fort-worth-2


EXPERIENCE,” SAYS DR. DAVID Moore, “is in the eye of the beholder.” Put another way, each patient has preferences unique to them, whether they care most about time, convenient and upfront pricing, carefully curated and unique frames, or a high-tech examination experience.

‘In today’s market you have to do a little of everything to be competitive,’ says Clear Eye owner Dr. David Moore.

It’s a lesson Moore learned over 10 years in private practice at Clear Eye Associates + Optical in Fort Worth, TX and fully implemented by introducing a new concept in 2017; an optical boutique procuring mostly independent lines. “The idea was the easy part. Overcoming, retraining and rethinking how the current consumer wants to shop has been the challenge. The age-old idea of personalized service, customer experience, and product expertise has become the linchpin for growing the business,” Moore says.

Central to the concept is customer immersion in what Moore refers to as the “CLEAR experience,” from the time they book and select their arrival item — be it a cappuccino, chocolate or craft beer ­— to the personal handwritten “thank you” note and custom cookie that arrive for them in the mail in a special CLEAR box. Staff follow this up with a call a few weeks after the customer has received the product to make sure they are satisfied.

For those who haven’t booked, “We try to impact our patients prior to their appointment so we begin with a tailored check-in experience. Our staff presents a menu, with offerings ranging from chocolate to cappuccino or a seasonal cocktail.”

According to Moore, the store and the service are designed around creating an experience and offering products that appeal to the aficionado. “Our intent is to cater to people that want to feel special, where their time is valued, and their needs are met.”

EyeDesigns and architect Norman Ward were able to create a modern design with Lum lighting that highlights the detail of the frames and allows customers to look their best.

Frames are displayed by brand but in a carefully controlled way. “We want patients to recognize brands from distinct signage that looks like our store, versus our store looking like 20 different brands,” Moore says.

When Moore discusses pricing policy, the value he places on being “upfront” and “transparent” quickly becomes apparent. But he admits that achieving this goal is complicated by the presence of so many different insurance plans with different pricing.

“Our team has done a great job learning the plans and developing methods to more quickly give accurate pricing for customers,” he explains. “For uninsured customers, we have selected products that provide value and state-of-the-art fashion while fitting within their budget. We feel that giving customers lens pricing first then allowing them to select the perfect frame is the most transparent way for customers to purchase spectacles.”

Moore says digital marketing is second only to personal referrals as a driver of growth at Clear Eye. “We do well with Google, Facebook, and are growing our Instagram presence. What we have learned is that in today’s market you have to do a little of everything to be competitive. Photography is key to making everything pop.”

Having an on-site lab is important to Moore because it enables the practice to customize lenses and lens shapes. And quick turnaround is something they pride themselves in. “Our Mr. Orange edger helps us do this,” says Moore. “The edger has been great for us. Although we are a boutique optical, we want to provide the most comprehensive eyecare possible.” The practice prides itself on a full range of equipment as well as top-level dry eye treatment.

This no-stone-unturned approach would seem to be Clear Eye’s signature achievement, whether it’s online, at reception, in the optical or the exam lane. As Moore defines it: “Expertise and personalized service in a modern, clean aesthetic that provides a unique experience for our customers.”

PHOTO GALLERY (18 IMAGES)

Five Cool Things About Clear Eye Associates + Optical

1. QUICK CLEAN. Clear Eye’s optical features the OpticWash, a device Moore describes as a “car wash for glasses … an ingenious inven­­tion that does a great job of cleaning frames and lenses.”

2. GET THE MESSAGE. Patients are sent a text after their glasses purchase with details on their frames. The text contains links to the product’s brand story so that the customer can learn more about their frames prior to them being completed.

3. SMELL OF SUCCESS. The list of items offered to patients prior to their arrival goes beyond just drinks and sweets; even the music and scent have been selected specifically for customers.

4. NO SURPRISES. Price transparency is one of Clear Eye’s core goals. To ensure this is maintained, the practice makes a point of working up special handouts with pricing information on lens benefits and cost.

5. FULL TREATMENT. Clear Eye takes special pride in its dry eye treatment. “Dry eye impacts our core demographic to such an extent we felt the need to have the technology to solve this problem for our patients,” says Moore.

WHAT THE JUDGES SAID

  • Interesting color scheme; the natural wood looks great and is a contrast to the whites. Offering craft beer is a great idea too. Mick Kling, OD, Invision Optometry, San Diego, CA
  • The “CLEAR” logo is handled in a very nice way, where it is important to the conversation but does not dominate it. Their dedication to making information accessible to the customer is evident in their materials, and the delivery of a customized cookie and a handwritten note is a charming touch. Brent Zerger, l.a. Eyeworks, Los Angeles, CA
  • Texting a customer cool details on the frame they’ve purchased is CLEARly brilliant and impactful! Their “Seeing Good” campaign is wonderful: they donate generously AND they’ve “branded” it. One of the best URLs I’ve ever seen; simple and in line with their overall brand. Robert Bell, EyeCoach, San Francisco, CA

 

Fine Story

Clear Eye donates 100 frames each month to a local charity clinic as part of its “Seeing Good” campaign. “Although we don’t publicize or market this, we feel that local is important. We are fortunate enough to be able to partner with Community Clinic in Fort Worth, which is run by the University of Houston College of Optometry. They see thousands of patients a year at little to no cost in the First Christian Church downtown. Donating frames is our way of helping the local community.”

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A Stunning Milwaukee Practice That Is the Culmination of 3 Decades of Constant Improvement

Being served here ‘is like meeting a friend in a coffee shop.’

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Ziegler Leffingwell Eyecare, New Berlin, WI

OWNERS: Dave Ziegler, OD, and Chap Leffingwell, OD; URL:zleyecare.com ; FOUNDED: 1981; OPENED FEATURED LOCATION:2017; ARCHITECT AND DESIGN FIRMS: Plunkett Raysich Architects, Briohn Construction, EyeDesigns; EMPLOYEES: 20 full-time, 4 part-time ; AREA: 7,400 sq. ft.; TOP BRANDS: Ørgreen, Robert Marc, Blackfin, Etnia Barcelona, Prodesign; TWITTER:twitter.com/zleyecare; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/ZieglerLeffingwellEyeCare; INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/zleyecare; BUILDOUT COST: $250,000


WHAT IS NOW ZIEGLER Leffingwell Eyecare began life in 1981 in Milwaukee, WI, as a small, two-day-a-week office purchased from a retiring OD. In 1983, Dr. Dave Ziegler moved the office to a new location with one employee. Over time the staff doubled in that building until the business moved to a larger space in 1996 and added Dr. Chap Leffingwell as a partner. After years of growth, Ziegler’s daughter Dr. Kristen Ziegler joined part time in 2015. Two years later the practice relocated to a new standalone building.

The present location is in New Berlin, a middle-class suburb of Milwaukee. According to Ziegler Sr., the optical was designed around high-end brands not well known to the average consumer. “This gives us the opportunity to tell brand stories about the quality eyewear we display. This selection also differentiates us from the competition, since the brands we carry are rarely found in the state.”

Dr. Dave Ziegler, left, bought the practice from a retiring OD in 1981. Dr. Chap Leffingwell, right, joined as a partner in 1996.

Inspiration was found in Nordstrom and the Apple Store. “We wanted a large, open space to separate our brands with what we call ‘white space,’ he says. “This gives the patient the opportunity to process what our optical staff has told them about … a particular frame … They can then leave that area, browse around and engage with another brand.”

Custom-made cherry communal tables encourage movement throughout the space, with frame trays recessed into tabletops to keep things orderly, and risers at the ends of the tables drawing interest to collections. Shelving and recessed cubbies abound; pegs are banished. LUM lighting ensures the frames’ design features and color are displayed to best effect. EyeDesigns helped the practice develop a consistent aesthetic.

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The retail and reception spaces overlap, changing up floor textures, colors and materials to create interest. Ziegler has strict rules for the concierge desk: “No clutter… Just a couple of Macs, a phone, a credit-card processing pad, and two welcoming faces. I’m a minimalist.” The silent phone is for internal use only; incoming calls go to the back office.

Some of Ziegler Leffingwell’s staff have been with the practice for over 30 years; Ziegler credits its carefully crafted culture of mutual respect. Management comes up with “purposeful agendas” to provide a platform for discussion at monthly staff meetings. “We’re constantly searching for ways to improve the patient experience while learning from our failures,” says Ziegler, who believes it’s important that this process begin with the doctor or owner. “It is crucial to make the investment in the leadership skills necessary to build your own culture of excellence,” he says.

The medical experience at Ziegler Leffingwell is underpinned by a simple idea: “We help patients understand the different solutions to their vision problems so they feel included in the process and feel confident with our treatment plans. The most important document we have is the blank pad of paper with our practice logo in our exam room. This is where we write our recommendations and explain everything from lens options to ocular diseases. Hand-written explanations in easy-to-understand language show the patient you care enough to make sure they fully understand. It’s not uncommon for patients to bring in those notes years later.”

All patients are pre-registered by intake staff, and pretest suites have glass walls for an open feel. The concierge desk staff have a view of these rooms, improving patient flow. The six exam rooms are named for Milwaukee landmarks, which are depicted on their walls in specially created murals. “The themed exam rooms are the most talked about feature by our patients,” Ziegler says.

Disliking the way typical dispensing tables force staff and customer apart, the practice added two cafe tables and asked sales staff to sit alongside the patient instead of across from them. Ziegler says this creates a collaborative approach. “It’s like meeting your friend at the local coffee shop.” Rounding off the experience, a show is made of dispensing. The eyewear is brought out on a leather tray in branded cloth shopping bags containing a case with the patient’s name embossed on it, a customized portfolio explaining the eyewear features, and a piece of Ghirardelli or Lindt chocolate.

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Ziegler Leffingwell’s success reflects its constant search for ways to personalize the patient experience. “We look for ways to connect with patients and treat them like family,” Ziegler says.

PHOTO GALLERY (16 IMAGES)

Five Cool Things About Ziegler Leffingwell Eyecare

1. MAJOR LEAGUE. Ziegler Leffingwell has been an eyecare provider for the Milwaukee Bucks, Milwaukee Brewers, Milwaukee Wave indoor soccer, cycling teams and other pro sports organizations.

2. KIDS’ STUFF. The “jungle play room” for young patients has a starlit ceiling, dragonfly lights, Brio train set and lots of other toys. All kids get an ice cream cone Rx after their exam.

3. TAKE YOUR PICK. An online curated selection of glasses shows the staff’s faves for five different fashion personalities. Patients can preselect their favorites, which will be ready for viewing at exam time.

4. FIVE-STAR SERVICE. Dr. Ziegler got the idea for the practice’s concierge-style reception space while strolling through a hotel lobby in San Francisco.

5. GLAD YOU ASKED… Sales staff have flashcards for each frame brand with three talking points (memorized, ideally) about that brand.

WHAT THE JUDGES SAID

  • Applause for thinking through the displays so each brand can have a voice and not overwhelm the customer. All elements of the practice demonstrate thoroughness and competence, which inspires confidence and ease. Brent Zerger, l.a. Eyeworks, Los Angeles, CA
  • A private label frame line to fund a vision clinic doesn’t get you top optical retailer but it does tell us you have the largest hearts (and Souls.) What does? How about the most brilliant and personalized marketing campaign I’ve ever seen in this industry and a website that gets it’s not about the practice, but the consumer. Robert Bell, EyeCoach, San Francisco, CA
  • The marketing is next-level and they show mastery in both the medical and optical sides of the business. Natalie Taylor, Artisan Eyewear, Meredith, NH

 

Fine Story

Among their selection of independent brands is Ziegler Leffingwell’s private label — Soul, manufactured by SHO Eyewear — which helps fund a clinic they’re building in Haiti with Mission of Hope Haiti. From every purchase, $40 is donated. The goal, says Ziegler, “is for the Haitian technicians … to do the refractions with a SV-1 handheld autorefractor … upload the data to the cloud using Revolution EHR… A group of ECPs in the U.S. review the refractions and enter an Rx to meet Haiti’s requirements. This triggers our supply chain through Essilor labs to send them uncut lenses, which are edged onsite.” He is also showing them how to make a small profit on each transaction so they can be self-sustaining.

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This Ontario OD Is Off to a Flying Start

When her hometown’s original fire hall went on the market, she knew it was time to open a business.

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EYES – Dr. Abby Jakob, Kingsville, ON, Canada

OWNER: Abby Jakob, OD; URL:abbyjakobeyes.com ; FOUNDED: 2017; ARCHITECT AND DESIGN FIRMS: Helena Ventrella Design Limited, LaSalle Millwork Patrick Michaud, Maurice Michaud; EMPLOYEES: 1 full-time, 1 part-time ; AREA: 2,100 sq. ft.; TOP BRANDS: Oliver Peoples, Kate Spade, Tiffany, Tom Ford, Swarovski; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/abbyjakobeyes; INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/abbyjakobeyes; BUILDOUT COST: $300,000


After working as an associate at a private practice and several commercial offices, Dr. Abby Jakob took the leap and opened her own practice in her hometown of Kingsville, Ontario in 2017. She hadn’t expected to make such a major move so early in her career — it had only been three years since her graduation from the Illinois College of Optometry — but when the town’s original fire hall went on the market, the choice was all but made for her. “My experience was serendipitous, as I wasn’t even searching for a location — I didn’t think I’d be starting my own practice yet — and this historic building went up for sale. It’s right on Main Street, where traffic is the busiest. I called my dad right away to come see it with me, and as soon as we both saw the potential, I put in an offer the next day,” she says. Jakob had saved a lot in her first two years of practicing, and was able to come up with a 20-percent down payment, so financing wasn’t an issue. Also, the building has one other commercial unit, and two residential units upstairs, which already had paying tenants, so that covers her mortgage each month. “I’d definitely recommend owning your building if you have the opportunity,” she says.

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After being away at school for eight years, Jakob was ready to come home to Kingsville, Canada’s southernmost town. She describes it as “small, ‘boutiquey’ … with lots of cute shops and restaurants, and I wanted my office to have that same character and charm.”

Jakob renovated the site to look bright and airy with lots of natural light, but with warming touches such as three sparkling crystal chandeliers above the optical and a barnwood wall in the front desk area. “I love the shabby chic look, so I added a touch of rustic charm” with the wall, she says.

When Kingsville, Ontario’s original fire hall went on the market, Jakob knew it was time to open her own practice.

Her main challenge was making design decisions. “I am not a natural at picturing the ‘after’ while looking at the ‘before,’” she admits. For this reason, she’s a strong advocate of getting outside help. Jakob says the first person she called after buying the building was Ohio-based optometric practice consultant Dr. Richard S. Kattouf. He helped with the design and layout of the office, and offered advice on hiring and running the business. “For anyone overwhelmed at the thought of opening a practice cold, but who knows that it’s their dream, I’d highly recommend hiring a consultant … A quote that has stuck with me is ‘You don’t know what you don’t know.’”

Jakob doesn’t target a specific clientele, but says she sees a lot of women between the ages of 20 and 40, and believes this has to do with the big role that social media plays in her advertising. “My optical caters to much more than this specific demographic, but I would say these patients are the ones that spread the word on my pretty boutique optical, and offer a lot of support on my social media platforms.”

Jakob does all her own social media. She devotes a considerable amount of time to it, posting something “cute, clever or informative” on Instagram and FB daily, something she’s quite sure has attracted many new patients. She had Cowlick Studios design her website and logo, but since then has done all of her own branding and advertising, including POP, gift certificates, thank you cards and social media posts.

Frames are merchandised as male, female or unisex, as well as by brand. Her favorites are Oliver Peoples, Maui Jim, Tom Ford, Swarovski and Kate Spade, but Jakob is interested in private label and hopes someday to design a house brand.
EYES has its own edger, and “amazing staff member Pauline makes all of our glasses in house.” The practice does not currently have an inventory of lenses, but the labs Jakob uses are quick and most jobs are done in a week or sooner.

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Jakob prides herself on keeping up with the latest technology. However, she keeps the patient’s perspective in mind when it comes to tech. “One thing I’m proud of is that patients always tell me how much they appreciate how thorough I am and that I explain everything I am doing and why.” She believes this has helped grow her practice quickly. “Patients don’t care how much you know,” Jakob says, “until they know how much you care.”

PHOTO GALLERY (19 IMAGES)

Five Cool Things About EYES – Dr. Abby Jakob

1. AWARD WINNER. Dr. Jakob received the Young Professional of the Year Award from the Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce at the 28th Annual Business Excellence Awards in April last year.

2. BLOOMING FRIENDSHIP. Every woman who has an exam at EYES is given a flower afterward.

3. FAMILY TIES. The optical at EYES is adorned by an eyeglasses-themed table made by Jakob’s “amazing” father-in-law, with help from her “awesome” husband.

4. A GOOD SIGN. EYES’ distinctive exterior sign was made by local metal company, Bailey Inc. “Since opening, I’ve actually had several friends ask for his information and he even made a logo for another OD in Connecticut.”

5. FULL SERVICE. Jakob performs a screening OCT on all adults, and retinal photos “on any patient old enough to sit still long enough for it.”

WHAT THE JUDGES SAID

  • “Patients don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care!” Hello all ECPs? Read it. Learn it. Be it!!! Congrats, Dr. Jakob, That’s the ballgame. You move to the front of the class with that one! To be just starting out, like this, tells me we have an optometric superstar retailer on our hands. Robert Bell, The Eye Coach, San Francisco, CA
  • The logo and awning have a lot of impact. Natalie Taylor, Artisan Eyewear, Meredith, NH
  • What a great little boutique practice! It has a nice, modern, fresh look to it that is very inviting. I like the energy of the owner and her eye for details in design. Jennifer Coppel, TURA, Inc., New York, NY

 

Fine Story

Jakob has some interesting ideas on the best way to use social media. “Don’t just post the usual ‘eye’ and ‘glasses’ stuff you can search for on Pinterest, that you didn’t make. Think about what’s on your mind that day and then search for clever quotes about it … Then if you want to make it your own, create it in an app like WordSwag. It doesn’t always have to be about the eyes!” Jakob says she always gets more likes when she posts a picture of herself, her staff, her pets or her patients (with their permission), “because everyone loves to get to know people, and people love supporting people. I recently got married, and so many of my patients are so supportive and interested, so for those of you that have big events going on in your life, patients love getting a glimpse into that, and I believe it makes their connection to you stronger.”

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