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Tennessee Practice Throws Itself an Epic Birthday Party, Creates New Tradition

This patient-appreciation event made for a great business-building tool.

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ANDREW AND ELIZABETH HOWARD, optometrists and co-owners of LaFollette Eye Clinic in Jacksboro, TN, pride themselves on a level of service that has patients coming in from Ohio, Texas, and Florida. As the practice’s 30th anniversary approached in October last year, they decided a one-day trunk show wouldn’t reach as many people as they wanted. An occasion like this warranted something special.

THE IDEA

Celebrate a 30-Year Milestone

“We like to capitalize on milestones as a way to generate interest, and the 30-year milestone was a great opportunity,” Andy recalls. When it comes to event planning, ideas at LaFollette are typically generated and fleshed out in-house by the practice’s eight-person Leadership Team, which collectively boasts decades in eyecare. But, they also enjoy looking at other practices and sharing ideas with other doctors. “This event was a mixture of the two techniques. We traditionally hold one or two open houses or trunk shows a year, but we had never held a week-long celebration,” Howard says.

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THE EXECUTION

Diamonds and Pearls

It took the team several meetings to brainstorm ideas, then organize them. Various aspects were delegated to different leads on the team. Says Andy: “Involving the team builds engagement, loyalty and morale, and helped us keep our costs down.”

A “Diamonds and Pearls” theme was chosen. According to Andy, these are not only “modern and traditional anniversary gifts, but it’s also a great song by Prince.” The celebration itself featured giveaways, prizes, a 30-percent off sale, snacks and drinks all week, activities such as face-painting for kids, cornhole, and a “photo booth” with a retro-style instant camera for patients who used ’80s-themed props or their own new glasses for digital images that were shared on social media. In addition, demonstrations were held with reps from local crafters and artists’ groups — even a Lion’s Club member who brought in leader dogs for the blind. (A donation drive was held for the Lion’s Club.)

A local artist’s association was invited to bring in artwork; these were joined on LaFollette’s walls by “storyboards” highlighting the practice’s services, including photographs going back to the ’80s. Long-time patients and ex-staff members joined the celebration, and the optical even changed the music to ’80s hits for the week.

The costs were “minimal” given the scale of the event. A giant eyeglasses balloon sculpture was the most expensive item. “We had enough cupcakes for everyone, but they were made by a team member who is a wonderful baker.” All giveaways were donated by local businesses in exchange for marketing.

THE REWARDS

‘Too Fun to Wait’

The biggest surprise to Andy was how many people showed up just to wish LaFollette a happy anniversary. Sales were up during the week, but that was secondary to the goal of celebrating and thanking patients, he says. “It was more fun than we’ve had in a long time; that by itself is worth the effort.” He adds: “Now we need to begin looking for another excuse to have a week-long celebration… We had too much fun to wait 10 more years!”

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Do It Yourself: Hold A 
Patient-Centered Celebration

  • ALL HANDS ON. The key, says Andy, is involving the whole team. “So many people have different talents, and an event like this allows that talent to shine.”
  • CROSS-PROMOTE. Talk to neighboring businesses and see if they’ll contribute prizes in exchange for some free marketing.
  • GO WITH A PRO. Failing to plan is planning to fail. If you don’t have the HR depth that LaFollette has, consider using a professional event planner.
  • WIDE FOCUS. To foster a sense of community, think beyond eyewear. According to Andy, the leader dog for the blind was one of the hits of the week.
  • PICK A MOTIF. Choosing a theme gives you a hook to hang activities on. Practice turning 20? Ask your stylist for “The Rachel.”

After years covering some of the farther flung corners of the world of business journalism, Heath has more recently focused on covering the efforts of independent eyecare professionals to negotiate a fast-changing industry landscape. Contact him at heath@smartworkmedia.com.

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When You’re Passionate About Eye Care, the Right Technology Matters

Lisa Genovese, O.D., strives to give her patients the very best. At Insight Eye Care’s multiple locations, Dr. Genovese provides optimal care for her patients using the Reichert® Phoroptor® VRx Digital Refraction System. In this second Practice Profile Video from Reichert’s “Passionate About Eye Care” series, take a closer look and see how this eye care professional achieved a better work-life balance with equipment that’s designed and engineered in the U.S.A.

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Best of the Best

At Black Optical It Literally Pays for Staff to Travel and Stay Healthy

Owner Gary Black knows what work-life balance looks like—and how to achieve it for his team.

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AS AN EMPLOYER, one of Gary Black’s chief goals at his three Black Optical locations in Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Dallas is to eliminate — or at least reduce — the cost of living a healthy lifestyle, because, “We all know that when you feel great, you perform great.” Several years ago Black Optical implemented its wellness reimbursement program for employees.

THE IDEA

As Black sees it, the challenge for the small optical owner isn’t about “holding on” to talent. In part that’s because he doesn’t think that’s a realistic option for millennial employees, but it also reflects his view that the goal should be to develop — not merely retain — staff. “We want to develop people, while they help develop our brand. We hire with the intent that the candidate will be with us for the long haul, but we also realize this is not a reality for this generation.

Talented individuals want to explore opportunities, and gain experience in multiple fields.” With that in mind Black has set about creating opportunities for his staff to continue learning and to stay healthy.

THE EXECUTION

Gary Black

As Black was putting together the wellness reimbursement program a few years ago, he realized he needed a way to accommodate a staff member who enjoyed team sports, yet had no desire to set foot in a gym. So each member of the Black Optical team receives a $150 quarterly wellness reimbursement to use any way they see fit, whether it’s a gym membership, massage, holistic treatments, yoga classes, skydiving, or a 200-mile bike race entry fee. Says Black, “At the end of the day, I didn’t want to dictate what health and wellness means to our team. I also didn’t want anyone to feel left out by only offering one option.”

Team members are also offered a travel reimbursement every three years, which Black says, “eliminates lack of extra money as a barrier to explore and recharge our batteries.” An education reimbursement is in the works as well.

Black also offers more traditional benefits, including 401k with employer match, FSA accounts, and health/dental insurance coverage at $350 for singles and $500 for families. Staff are covered by a company-paid life insurance policy, and get 18 days of paid time off annually, which bumps up to 24 days after the third year.

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In order to receive the wellness reimbursement benefit, team members are required to complete a form quarterly. “It only takes about five minutes,” says Black, “but it does enable the team to shoulder some of the responsibilities.”

THE REWARDS

Black describes the main reward as “a happy team that feels appreciated and looks forward to contributing to the overall success of Black Optical.” He admits to demanding a lot from his team, and one of the main goals of his wellness program is to give them the time and money to disconnect when they need to, in a way that benefits them. “There’s this quote by Anne Lamott that has become my mantra lately: ‘Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few moments, including you.’ Needless to say, we work hard, though we encourage our team to step away as well.” Black encourages his team to put the money they save away for a rainy day. “As great of a place as Black Optical is to build a career,” he says, “the life goal is to eventually retire from this place.”

Do It Yourself: In-House Wellness Program

  • BE RECEPTIVE. “Listen to your team,” advises Black. “Get curious; discover what ensures their happiness and sense of security.”
  • MUTUAL BENEFIT. Staff get two pairs of free frames/lenses a year, plus unlimited pairs at 50% off for themselves and family. “We want as many frames on faces as possible, including our team.”
  • CALL IN THE PROS. Vendors like WellSteps and Sonic Boom can set up a wellness program for your business, but go with someone reputable — it’s a huge industry now and there are plenty of quacks around.
  • PHONE IT IN. Consider encouraging your staff to make use of the many wellness apps now available, such as Down Dog for yoga instruction or the mediation app Insight Timer.
  • HEADS TOGETHER. Business consultant Susan Steinbrecher recommends setting up a Wellness Committee to develop ideas and take responsibility for monitoring stress levels and causes in the office.

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Best of the Best

These Machines Let Boutiques Create Bespoke Frames Right Inside the Optical

Luca Mariotti’s EYEFRAME system lets the optical owner exist totally independently from big frame makers.

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OTTICA MORI, AN optical and optometric practice in Pisa, Italy, recently ventured into producing its own frames on-site. That’s a serious step for any owner, but Luca Mariotti went one step further, building his own “desktop factory” — a small-scale frame manufacturing system designed to fit in an optical shop. Ottica Mori now uses Mariotti’s EyeFrame System to produce its own line of frames, Mocchialeria.

THE IDEA

One day, as Mariotti was working on his hobby-grade CNC router, his daughter Chiara asked him if he could use it to make a frame from a blank of cellulose acetate. The results were disappointing. But the experiment sparked a chain of events that would transform Ottica Mori’s business. “We started to evaluate the true potential of self-produced frames. It only took a short time to realize that the earnings could be very interesting .” Mariotti invested in a professional grade router. But what he really wanted — a machine small enough to fit inside an optical but with the capacity to produce quality frames from an array of materials — didn’t appear to exist.

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Mariotti hooked up with a manufacturer who agreed to custom build a machine, but the partnership was a disappointment; he didn’t get along with the company and the result was “a steel monster” too large to be used in the shop.

THE EXECUTION

Mariotti, who has a background in machine design, took matters into his own hands and now produces his own “EyeFrame System” CNC routers for opticians. Small enough to fit in an optical, they can machine acetate, plastic, wood, buffalo horn, aluminum, alpaca, brass copper, silver, gold and other non-ferrous metals.

Using the system, Ottica Mori gets about seven to 10 custom frame orders a day. Mariotti starts with an analysis of the customer’s corrective needs, then takes measurements of their face and head. “Then we suggest possible solutions, often making drawings and involving the people in the process. With a set of cellulose acetate samples we choose the color and then we start to make the CAD drawings,” he says, referring to the software system that produces the final frame design.

Tracers are used to order lenses from a manufacturer, which are placed in the frames before final adjustments are made. “The tracer is also used to calculate the thickness of the lens prior to drawing the frame using a special tool we developed. Due to the fact that it is a custom frame, all the limitations we usually find are eliminated,” says Mariotti.

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THE REWARDS

Mariotti invested about $110,000 to develop the EyeFrame System and has produced four so far. It is aimed “mainly at opticians but we have raised the interest of industry too.” He is selling the system directly in Italy and looking for foreign distributors.

The practice’s custom eyewear business and small-series frame lines are also growing rapidly, and Ottica Mori now sells several M occhialeria frames a day, in addition to the custom orders.

“Our goal is to became a single line shop in two years,” says Mariotti. “People want a well-made frame, [and] the assurance that they can find spare parts in the future … Obviously the capability to have custom-design frames has led to some strange requests, but usually people want quality.”

On a personal level, he says, “It is the most important project in my life and it is very rewarding. I am proud of it. It is a family project and I am very happy to work with my sons. At the age of 56 this project is changing my life.”

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Best of the Best

At This Wellness-Focused Pennsylvania Boutique, Eye Health is Just the Start

Combining eyecare and eyewear with a range of self-care offerings, they treat not just the eye, but the rest of the body as well.

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WHEN SISTERS DR. Giulia and Paola Tinari opened Sorella Optique and Eyecare in Paoli, PA, a suburb of Philadelphia, their aim was to go beyond treating vision and eye health in isolation. They see eyecare as an integral part of overall wellbeing and wanted their practice to reflect that.

THE IDEA

Both sisters have been involved in overall health and wellness since their college days. “We’ve always had a strong belief in healing from within and getting to the root cause of any problem,” says Paola. “We think it is important to blend Eastern and Western medicine when treating not only the eye but the rest of the body. When you practice a healthy way of living, then incorporating it into your business is second nature.”

THE EXECUTION

The emphasis on wellness is evident in the products and services offered at Sorella, the advice Dr. Tinari dispenses, and the overall patient experience. “We created a soothing environment so patients feel at ease the moment they step into the office,” says Paola. “Dr. Tinari stresses the importance of good nutrition, not only for ocular health but overall health, and recommends supplementing with various antioxidants including lutein and zeaxanthin, bilberry, asthaxanthin, omega-3, and vitamin C.” Dr. Tinari likes to keep up with studies in nutrition and often recommends anti-inflammatory products to help reduce inflammation especially in diabetic patients or those with a family history of eye diseases like macular degeneration. Sorella offers vitamins at the office for patients to take home and are looking to bring more into inventory.

The practice’s website also links to PRN, an online vendor of a range of vitamin formulas designed to bolster many aspects of eye and vision health, including products targeting the health of the macular and retina regions of the eyes, and “Dry Eye Omega Benefits,” a formula designed to ease symptoms of the condition, among many others.

Sorella’s dry eye practice also makes use of the MiboFlo Thermoflo treatment. Says Paola: “Dry eye is very prevalent in today’s society. MiboFlo targets inflammation in the meibomian glands. Just like getting a deep tissue massage, this treatment offers patients relief by breaking down inflammatory byproducts and improving their tear film.”

Alongside their independent frame lines, Sorella Optique and Eyecare makes space for body care products such as Zents, a line of organic lotions, soaps, body washes and other items containing ingredients ranging from oolong tea to sandalwood and orris. The products claim to relieve conditions such as psoriasis and eczema, as well as provide de-stressing effects.

To get the wellness message out, the practice relies heavily on its active Instagram presence and has plans to launch a monthly blog that patients will receive via email.

THE REWARDS

The Tinari sisters find the ongoing self-education and patient-education that a devotion to wellness entails enhances their lives as businesspeople and as ECPs. “We recognize that people today have an interest in bettering themselves. We love offering patients alternative ideas to help heal and be preventative in their journey to wellness,” Paola says.

Like any niche, wellness is a passion, says Tinari. “What is it that you are passionate about in our field? If you love seeing pediatric patients and dread geriatrics, then stop, focus on what you are into. You may lose a few patients but gain so much by doing what you love all day long.”

Do It Yourself: Create a Wellness-Oriented Practice

  • HEAL THySELF. “Take care of yourself first,” says Paola Tinari. “If you are burnt out, your patients can sense it and your business will suffer.”
  • CROSS-MARKET. Setting yourself up as a wellness-focused practice opens up joint marketing opportunities; sound out a local spa or vendor of body care goods.
  • UP YOUR SERVICE GAME. In this field, excellent customer service is even more important than ever. Be prepared to always “do what is best for the patient.”
  • pick the right tEAM. Not everyone’s cut out for this line of work. Positivity and creativity are key, says Tinari. “Get rid of toxicity and your business will flourish.”
  • EDUCATE. Create a blog or newsletter to keep patients updated on the latest products and services.

 

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