Connect with us

Do You Or Don't You

Do You Or Don’t You: Advertise on TV?

mm

Published

on

Do you or don't you advertise on TV?

This article originally appeared in the January 2016 edition of INVISION.

YES, I DO

V Commercials are very well received. Our four 15-second ones are two to three years old. People still comment and claim it’s the first time they have seen them. We want to create new ones, but it’s a lot of work. If your TV rep says “it’s so easy and we do all the work,” they are lying! Julie Kubsch, Specs Around Town, Bloomington, IL (ED: See one of Specs Around Town’s spots at invmag.us/3.)

Advertisement

V This campaign was not as successful as previous ones. I believe it was the content, in which I had no input. Dorothy Reynolds, Optical Alternatives, Fairfield, CT
We just started with TV advertising, but so far have gotten good feedback. Meredith Nowak, Coffman Vision Clinic, Bend, OR


NO, I DON’T

The ROI is nearly impossible to track, the cost is astronomical when you consider that repetition is important, and it is like throwing a glass of water on a fire when one considers the chain advertising that I would be going up against. Todd Lapointe, VIP Eyes, Portland, ME

Sounds expensive and I have no desire to compete with the Eyeglass World commercials. Jill Schnurer, Village Eyecare Co., Clarkston, MI

Cost vs. benefit is very small now, especially when you consider more and more people are “cutting the cord” with their cable and moving to Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, etc. The only way I watch true TV is via TiVO and that lets me skip the commercials. The only ones I watch are the movie ads if I get caught up in the moment and forget to hit the advance button on the remote. Dr. Ted McElroy, Vision Source Tifton, Tifton, GA

Every local business ad I’ve ever seen has looked so amateur and hokey. If I’m making a video to tell people who we are, I want it to be perfect. The right-brain marketer in me wants to do it, but the owner’s budget prevents me from executing. Josh Bladh, Dr. Taylor Bladh, Diamond Bar, CA

Advertisement

Too expensive and the average TV viewer skips over advertising whenever possible. Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy/Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI

I have not watched TV for a decade. Our patient demographic does not watch TV. They do TiVo, Netflix or Amazon. Diana Sims, Buena Vista Optical, Chicago, IL

Because we are a higher end boutique, we are not for everyone and it’s too difficult to target that specific demographic via TV. We rely more on word of mouth, Internet and targeted donations to silent auctions. Eric Geiger, Styleyes, Sacramento, CA

We don’t do much advertising through traditional channels, because we find that the vast majority of our new patients come from referrals from our current patients. We’re also involved in a lot of community events and fundraisers, which generate visibility for our practice in our town. Katie Root, Vaughn Vision, Schenectady, NY

Print ads seem to work the best; customers cut them out and bring them in, sometimes crumpled or ragged, but in their hand! Claudia Hecht, Sterling Optical, Newburgh, NY

We don’t anymore due to cost and changing patterns of viewing. Does anyone watch TV like they used to? Dr. Joseph Smay, Family Eye Care, New Kensington, PA

Advertisement

JOIN THE BRAIN SQUAD!
➤ To share your hot sellers and see collected responses from our monthly surveys, owners and top managers of U.S.-based eyecare businesses are invited to join INVISION’s Brain Squad at: invisionmag.com/brainsquad.


Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

SPONSORED BY KENMARK

Jump In — the Water’s Fine!

With a salute to summer’s shimmery, mermaid colors and warm weather-loving shades, Kenmark Eyewear celebrates this summer’s Aloha spirit with eyewear from Vera Wang, Kensie, Zac Posen and the Original Penguin Collection!

Promoted Headlines

Do You Or Don't You

52% of You Do Not Have A Structured Onboarding or Orientation Program for New Employees

But the 48% of you who do are not playing around.

mm

Published

on

Yes: 48%

  • It’s a two day, two hour paid theory training of clusters of 4-6 people. Followed by a 2-day paid working interview/shadowing to apply what they learned and observe their attitude towards patients and staff. If congruent with our culture and values, we do a 2-week trial period and on board them. Once onboard, we do a two week check in and a two month check in. They have performance reviews twice a year afterwards. — Diana Canto Sims, OD, Buena Vista Optical, Chicago, IL
  • Two weeks going over how we like to treat people, procedures, products, and prices. — Marc Rosenberg, M&J Optical, Brookhaven, PA
  • We have an employee manual that must be read and signed. The new staff member will then shadow the position that he/she was hired for. — Sonja Franklin, OD, Modern Eyes, Austin, TX
  • A new team member would spend a day shadowing the role they will play prior to accepting the position. They will float for a few days to learn who their co-workers are and get a feel for the flow of the clinic. Employment paperwork is completed at this time. The length of training time depends on the position and their level of experience. — Deb Jaeger, Eye Center of the Dakotas, Bismarck, ND
  • Initial working interview to check suitability. Then one-on-one with their manager during the first day. Read and sign Policies and Procedures handbook. Then have new staff member shadow an employee doing the job responsibility for which they were hired. When comfortable, the new employee will work with patients, while shadowed by seasoned employee, until they feel comfortable. — Maury Kessler, OD, Eyecare Plus Scottsdale, Scottsdale, AZ
  • We have a program called Foundations after our new team member has been selected to join our team. The process in a nutshell is a three day onboarding program over three weeks. There is a follow up briefing on day 21. We do everything we can to get all the paperwork done before the first day so we can really focus on the new team member and how important they are to us. — Ted A. McElroy, OD, Vision Source Tifton, Tifton, GA
  • Although still in development, we have a training pathway spreadsheet to make sure everyone gets a similar start. — Tina Smrkovski, OD, Reed Optical, Claremont, NH
  • We are in a university setting so we have safety orientation, we require certain immunizations, we have HIPAA training. — Denise Robertson, Washington State University Vision Clinic, Pullman, WA
  • It’s a half day when all HIPPA/OSHA/Security/policies are reviewed. There is a training manual and proficiency checklist with their first six weeks of training planned out. — Bryan Hartgrave, Vision Solutions, Lamar, MO
  • The first day is usually an orientation of how our business functions and filling out paperwork. They are assigned a ‘Buddy’ to show them the ropes. — Pam Housley, Texas State Optical of Nederland, Port Arthur, TX
  • I would say it’s semi-structured. The first couple weeks are usually about the same – going over the basics and starting with adjustments and simple glasses dispenses. After that it depends on the person. Usually for a while they are shadowing, then they are shadowed or have someone available to answer questions for the first couple months. We also use a training checklist to make sure everything is gone over. — Elizabeth Knaus, A to Z Eye Care, Arcata, CA
  • Every staff orientation begins with reading the staff manual. 2. Shadowing a member who is training the new staff. 3. New staff will pretest or frame style a staff member before working with patients. — Sonja Franklin, OD, Modern Eyes, Austin, TX
  • The new hire process is a series of training manuals and online testing. — Jocelyn Anderson, National Vision Inc, Riverdale, GA
  • 30 days teaming up with another to help in day by day acclimation. — Monique Begin, BJ’s Optical, Manchester, CT
  • We have a one week orientation at our corporate office that covers our operating system, culture and basic optics. — Michael Dunn, Henry Ford Optimeyes, Troy, MI
  • Two weeks of orientation and training mostly on our systems and paperwork. The first week they are also shadowing, the second week they are being shadowed. — Elias Awad, OD, Invision Eyewear, Overland Park, KS
  • Breakfast on start day and then bring in to meet everyone in office, folder with all paperwork that needs done, quick check in at end of first day, make sure they have at least one achievement first day, follow-up one week, one month, and then 90 days. — Heidi Hipsher, Northland Eye Care, Flagstaff, AZ
  • We have a new trainee manual that we check off as we go through each section and they display an understanding of. — Cynthia Sayers, OD, EyeShop Optical Center, Lewis Center, OH
  • It’s always a work in progress, but there is a pre-work “welcome package.” What to expect the first day, first week, first month. Then we have expectations and training set for Day 1, Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4 and then monthly up to 6 months and then at year one. It’s detailed to the specific job but this way the new employee knows what to expect and what is expected of them. There are tests along the way to evaluate progress. — Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision, Edmond, OK
  • Product training, role playing, product knowledge, overcoming objections, using current terminology such as “non-glare” instead of “anti-reflection.” — BJ Chambers, Carrera Optical, McQueeney, TX
  • We have an employee handbook, 30 pages, that describes their position and the policies of the office. They must sign that they have read and understood the handbook before they are hired. Probation time is one month. If they do not fit, or the employee is not happy, the employee is let go. — Robert M. Easton, Jr. OD, FAAO, Oakland Park, FL
  • It’s lonnnng. Two months of webinars (medical & EHR), shadowing, training. Most of the two month period they are working, under supervision, and expanding their skill set through practice. The first month is largely reception area and medical practice (check-in, check-out, scheduling, referrals). The second month they become glasses experts (measurements, frame manufacturers, orders, manual lensometry). And then they get a raise once they’ve reached the end of the checklist at the end of two months. — Jen Heller, Pend Oreille Vision Care, Sandpoint, ID
  • We have new staff shadow before being hired, we also have a work book that outlines their job duties and responsibilities. Lastly they are required to be signed off by a manager for those tasks before being able to engage with patients. — Adam Ramsey, OD, Socialite Vision, Palm Beach Gardens, FL
  • We have a list of all the various responsibilities the employee will have and a checklist to mark for each when training is completed in 60 to 90 days. — Sarah Jerome, OD, Look+See Eye Care, Minneapolis, MN
  • We do a 90 day orientation. Training is 6-12 weeks depending on the position. There is a check list the trainer checks the new employee of. The first day is spend with administrator setting expectations. — Cindy Bruner, Professional Family Eyecare, Coldwater, OH
  • 60 intensive training, online education, job shadowing and education in every process in the office. — Bethany Cassar, Complete Eye Health, Holland, MI

No: 52%

  • New practice, so we’re still figuring some things out. — Pablo E. Mercado, Optima Eyecare, Alpharetta, GA
  • We have such a small staff and we find that the on boarding can be accomplished simply by immersing new employees in our culture. We have them shadow different members of the staff all day and they usually learn on the fly. — Harris Decker, Eye Designs Of Westchester, Scarsdale, NY
  • Working on it though! — Pam Peters, Midwest Eye, Downers Grove, IL
  • The reason I don’t have a structured orientation program is because things are constantly changing, improving and growing at my office. We usually hire on personality and then have another staffer bring the new hire around for the day but nothing that is formal. — Marc Ullman, OD, Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NJ
  • Orientation programs are expensive when utilizing formal structure and our practice is not large enough to justify the cost. — Leisa Lauer, Westcliff Optometry, Newport Beach, FL
  • We just go right to training for the position. Before being hired a new candidate will come in for part of a day and shadow everyone working in the office to see if they like it. — Lindsey Pulford, Insights Eyecare, Manhattan KS
  • It’s tailored to the individual, how much experience they have, how familiar they are with our collections and our software. — Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy & Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI
  • We have an outline of what needs to be learned and we train hands on for the majority of it. We also utilize OpticianWorks from Laramy K. We’ve discussed getting a more detailed program for new employees but haven’t had time to dedicate to it yet. — Travis LeFevre, Krystal Vision, Logan, UT
  • We have tried a couple of things, but we are so busy and run a very small staff, that the new employee, unfortunately, is the last to get attention. — Nichole Montavon, Oskaloosa Vision Center, Oskaloosa, LA

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

Continue Reading

Do You Or Don't You

Oh PDs … A Contentious Subject … But 83% of You Provide Them When Asked

Though some of you DO charge for the measurement, 17% refuse to provide it at all.

mm

Published

on

Yes: 83%

  • We do not charge, according to Texas optometry laws it is required. — Pam Housley, Texas State Optical, Port Arthur, TX
  • I give it to good patients who I like or whose entire family I see for no charge and get the good will out of it. Some patients ask because they have an optician in the family who they order glasses from and that’s never a problem. Non-patients who come in knowing they are ordering online we suggest using the method described online and explain that we only take measurements for glasses we are ordering. — Marc Ullman, OD, Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NY
  • We have a charge for an optical consult but I do not usually charge the patient to get their PD. I do like to sit with the patient and go through common issues with purchasing online so they keep that in mind and 9/10 times they come back with issues. — Caitlin Wicka, San Juan Eye Center, Montrose, CO
  • If they have purchased eyeglasses, I will give it to them, if they have not I charge $50. Everyone signs a waiver. — Sherry Berry, Eye against Eye and Ardmore Eye Care, Ardmore, Pa
  • Only to patients who have purchased from us before, free of charge. — Larah Alami, OD, Hudson River Eye Care, Tarrytown and White Plains, NY
  • Anyone, no charge. — Richard Frankel, OD, Atlantic Cape Eyecare, Wildwood, NJ
  • Established only and it depends on the situation, sometimes we charge. — Susie Phillips, Dr. Brendon Johnson, O.D., Pekin, IL
  • We charge if we’re taking new measurements and they have not purchased glasses. We offer two levels of “Professional Optical Services:” The PD and OCs/seg height if frame has been purchased, and these measurements plus verification and adjustment of the frame after purchase for a slightly higher fee. We explain the measurements are important and are normally provided by the seller of the glasses, but if they are not offering the service, we are happy to do it for a nominal fee. — Sarah Jerome, OD, Look + See Eye Care, Minneapolis, MN
  • We provide PD for $25, and a package including adjustments, verification and measurements for $50. If you bring glasses in after the fact because you can’t see, we charge $50 to diagnose and share that with the customer. — Nikki Griffin, EyeStyles Optical, Oakdale, MN
  • Only to established patients. If outside, we charge for them. — Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision of Edmond, Edmond, OK
  • No charge. — Sabina Krasnov, I2ioptique, Scottsdale AZ
  • No charge to anyone. — Annie Thompson, Lawrence Eye Care Optical, Lawrence, KS
  • Yes, free to patients on same day as exam. We charge $5 for walk-in’s or when it’s been some time since the patient’s exam. — Jen Heller, Pend Oreille Vision Care, Sandpoint, ID
  • Yes for established patients, we charge walk-in customers a fee. — Deb Jaeger, Eye Center of the Dakotas, Bismarck, ND
  • We will provide PDs for anyone regardless of patient status and we do not charge. We will educate the patient, however, on the other measuring requirements for the best lens to make sure they are getting what they need elsewhere. — Selena Jachens, Urban Eyecare & Eyewear, West Des Moines, IA
  • I’ll give the PD to long time patients. If you come in off the street looking for a PD then $25. — Jeff Grosekemper, Casa De Oro Eyecare, Spring Valley, CA
  • Not to anyone, only our current patients. We try to educate them on the benefits of in person care. — Deanna Alexander, OD, Eyecare Associates, Fort Collins, CO
  • Yes, we provide it after having the patient pay a fee and sign a waiver explaining that the PD is only one of several measurements needed for the proper fabrication of eyewear and stating that we are not responsible for any errors in eyewear made outside of our office. — Christine Howard, Attleboro Vision Care, Attleboro, MA
  • On a case by case bases. I try to advise the patient that the PD is not part of the prescription and that it is used primarily for the fitting of glasses. If a patient is established, I don’t hesitate but if they are in for exam only and ask, I definitely give my online ordering is not all it’s cracked up to be spiel. — William Chancellor, Eye Can See Eyewear, McDonough, GA
  • Anyone, don’t be silly, just give it out. — Daniel R. Wolfe, OD, Cedar Rapids, IA
  • I will give PD to established patients if asked, but only after I give them quick reasons to not purchase from online retailers. New patients we charge a fee which includes me personally checking their completed eyewear for accuracy and adjusting. — Stacey Nutting, The Eye Doctors at CNY Eye Care, East Syracuse, NY
  • To anyone that comes in asking. I do not charge and I make sure they have both monocular and binocular PDs and explain the difference. — Jade Kowalick, Ryczek Eye, St. Petersburg , FL
  • Established only. No charge. — John LaShorne, Brown County Eye Care, Nashville, IN
  • I give the PD when ever asked by the patient. It rarely happens that people ask. — Leisa Lauer, Dr. H. Michael Shack, Newport Beach, FL
  • We charge to warranty our measurements and work done. — Dennis Iadarola, OD, Center For Vision Care, Monroe, CT
  • Typically, it’s just current clients. — Kevin Count, Prentice Lab, Glenview, IL
  • Thankfully, not many people come in for their PD to go order online. I don’t love doing it but I do hoping that they will figure out it’s not that great of an idea to get them offline and eventually come here. I do not charge at this time, but if it becomes a big deal, I probably would consider charging for it. — Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL
  • Only if we have one from within 12 months, which means the patient has purchased within the last 12 months. — Bethany Cassar, Complete Eye Health, Holland, MI
  • We charge $25 if a patient takes their script and walks. — Chris Lopez, OD, Roberts Eyecare Associates, Vestal, NY
  • We charge $10 to anyone wanting us to take a PD, whether they are a patient or not. I tell them it also includes me checking the outside Rx and adjusting the frame as well. — Kathy Maren, Comb EyeCare & Eyewear, Western Springs, IL
  • We do not charge and we will help anyone. — Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • If the patient has previously purchased from us we provide that measurement at no charge. Otherwise, there is a small charge to provide a professionally measured monocular PD. — Zachary Dirks, OD, St. Peter and Belle Plaine Eyecare Centers, Saint Peter, MN
  • We provide PD’s to patients that request them if we have provided the service before after seeing our doctor. Half a loaf of bread is better than none at all. — Tim Gray, Visual Eyes, Huntingdon Valley, PA
  • Yes, no charge. — Melissa Creath, AAFEC, Lothian, MD
  • No charge. But it’s a great opportunity for me to say, “Where are you getting your glasses? Do you know we have packages as low as $39?” You wouldn’t believe how many people end up buying from us! — Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY
  • Not provided in optical, simply state that whoever makes the glasses for them will be able to take that measurement. In exam, if asked, it is given as a rough estimate, but patient made aware it is not exact and should be done by an optician. — Andrew Romeril, OD, Torrey Highlands Optometry, San Diego, CA
  • Established patients only. — Jocelyn Anderson, National Vision, Riverdale, GA
  • Only established patients. — Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • Only in very select and unique situations, and to established patients only, and after they hear my spiel on the perils of ordering eyewear online, but I do not charge for it. — Pablo E. Mercado, Optima Eye Care, Alpharetta, GA
  • We are being paid for an exam and I feel that the PD is part of the patients Rx, there is no reason for any dialogue because that takes time and time is money. — Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • Established patients and customers. We don’t charge, but it gives us the opportunity to educate patients about the risk of buying online. We also offer to inspect their eyewear when it comes back. Patients really start to get it when you can mark their optical center on their glasses and it sits 10mm below their pupil. — Jenna Gilbertson, McCulley Optix Gallery, Fargo, ND
  • Established patients no charge, all others $10. — Judith Whitelaw, Dr. Gregory Char, OD, Orange, OR
  • We let them know it’s part of a $30 package where we will get exact measurements for their frame, and make any adjustments and minor repairs for the year. — Michael Martorana, OD, Falls City Eye Care, Louisville, KY
  • It’s part of the medical/chart information patients are entitled to. We will provide PD’s for non-patients if they are purchasing eyewear. — Dave Schultz, OD, Urban Optics, San Luis Obispo, CA
  • We only charge if they are buying online and haven’t purchased here; $10 buckaroos. — Rick Rickgauer, Vision Associates, Girard, PA
  • Normally, it’s an established patients and we do not charge. — Pam Neagle, Austin Eyeworks, Austin, TX
  • We don’t charge, but I do take my time and go over the benefits of purchasing through us versus online retailers. I offer to check the glasses when they come in to verify accuracy. Basically, I use it as a teachable moment and educate the patient. — Kim Hilgers, Monson Eyecare Center, Owatonna, MN
  • Only because my doctor tells me to, otherwise I would charge. It’s a service that is being provided and with all other services, why not charge? — Scott Felten, Fox Valley Family Eye Care, Little Chute, WI
  • We provide the PD on the printed Rx we give to the patient at no charge. — Deanna Phillips, Clemmons Family Eye Care, Clemmons, NC
  • We will take a PD for anyone. We charge unless we already have a recent PD measurement on file. The charge includes verification of Rx in the glasses purchased elsewhere, as well as basic adjustments at the patient’s own risk as we can’t guarantee the quality of the frames. We have had very little pushback with this method. — Katie Root, Latham Family Vision, Latham, NY
  • Anyone. — Scott Keating, OD, Vision Trends, Dover, OH
  • Free to established patients. We don’t get very many requests from non-patients. — Jessika Arena, The Eye Center, Asheville, NC
  • To established patients at no charge. — Dorothy Reynolds, Optical Alternatives, Milford, CT

No: 17%

  • Proprietary information. If a problem occurs with the Rx then liability can be claimed by another making the lens. — Alexander Saper, Great Glasses, Houston, TX
  • We just tell them we are not taking responsibility for the orders they place outside of our establishment so if there is anything made incorrectly we are not responsible in any way. We can’t be responsible for human error that doesn’t happen under our roof or in our labs on orders placed by us. — Nancy Revis, Uber Optics, Petaluma, CA
  • Those measurements will be taken by the optician fitting you for your glasses. — Paul Pascarella, OD, Pascarella Eye Care & Contact Lenses PC, Newtown, PA
  • We advise the patients those are included as custom measurements offered to our patients as a comprehensive fitting of our eyewear. — Blake Hutto, OD, Family Vision Care, Alma, GA
  • We no longer do. We state that our attorney said we needed to take ourselves out of the chain of liability. — Frances Ann Layton, Eye Associates of South Georgia, Valdosta, GA
  • We can’t provide that measurement due to liability. Wherever you get the glasses from, they should be able to measure it. — Bhumika Patel, OD, Redstone Family Vision, Indian Land, SC
  • A PD is not part of the medical record. Even if the patient requests a copy of their medical records they would not find it there. We tell our patients that it is a measurement taken by the eyecare professional who is ordering the patient’s glasses. — Dawn Christman Munoz, North Valley Eye Medical Group, Indian Hills, CA

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

Continue Reading

Do You Or Don't You

35% of You Actively Keep Tabs on Your Competition in Creative Ways

The remainder of you are pretty confident you don’t have competition … or don’t have the time to keep track of them.

mm

Published

on

Yes: 35%

  • We have a PE chain in town, and another competitor who has been here for 30 years. We don’t keep a close eye on them, but we’re cordial and friendly with them. Mainly just keep an eye on what they are selling, as we don’t want to carry the same lines. We request the reps not sell the exact same lines, but they don’t always follow through. But that’s how it goes in the small towns. — Jim Williams, Eye to Eye, Mexico, MO
  • Follow on social media. We are the only optical shop in the area. So our clients come from the competition after their eye exam. We hear from our clients what or what not the others in the area are doing. — Julie Kubsch, Specs Around Town, Bloomington, IL
  • We do A LOT of Facebook stalking in our downtime! — Jess Gattis, Thomas Vision Clinic, Leesville, LA
  • I secret shop stores, visit their websites and Instagram postings. — Mitchell Kaufman, Marine Park Family Vision, Brooklyn, NY
  • I only keep tabs on competitors by picking my drug and frame reps brains. I always ask what my competition is up to. I ask who is busy, who is using their products, who is updating their office, etc… — Marc Ullman, OD, Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NJ
  • I physically talk to them. — Kenneth Weiner, OD, Livingston, NJ
  • Shop sales and inventory. — Ann-Marie Weaver, Optimal Eye Care, Lewis Center, OH
  • Visit incognito. — Mickey Bradley, Patrick Optical, Fort Worth, TX
  • Honor competitors pricing if feasible. — Yen Nguyen, Black Optical, Dallas, TX
  • We are a member of Vision Source, so rather than keep tabs, we share information between our Vision Source practices that may help boost all of us up. We have regional quarterly meetings and that’s where I find I get the most out of being a VS member. Those conversations with other local opticals can be absolutely priceless! I’ve also found a lot of great advice on the Opticians on Facebook or ODs on Facebook groups! — Tiffany Firer, Lifetime Eyecare, Jenison, MI
  • Check media, online promotions, walk through. — Bob McBeath, Edina Eye, Edina, MN
  • Watch online activity/advertising. — Pam Peters, Midwest Eye, Downers Grove, IL
  • We believe it is very important to know what our competition is up to. In no order of importance we: Check their reviews on Google, Yelp, etc. Review their social media platforms and websites. Pay a visit to see what’s new in the store be it frames, people, or décor. We do announce ourselves when we visit our competitors, we don’t try to play 007. We are also very open and always invite our competitors to visit us. We actually invite them for coffee. Funny thing.. they never show up especially opticians which surprises us to no end. How can NOT have an interest in your competitors store, inventory, etc.? — Steve Nelson, Eye Candy Optical, Westlake, OH
  • Periodically. — Ron Catterson, Clear View Optix, The Villages, FL
  • Small community, we try to work with the smaller boutiques and compliment frame lines rather than carry the same styles. Larger clinics in our area need to keep up with us! — Deb Jaeger, Eye Center of the Dakotas, Bismarck, ND
  • “I have friends in low places…” — Dennis Iadarola, OD, Center For Vision Care, LLC, Monroe, CT
  • Check advertising. — Pam Neagle, Austin Eyeworks, Austin, TX
  • We watch what they do for promos. We try and separate ourselves from other eyecare offices. — Theodore Sees, OD, Rockford Family Eyecare, Rockford, MI
  • It is always a good idea to see what others are doing, even if you have no intention of copying it. Knowing what others do can show what could work (or not) in your practice. — Pablo E. Mercado, Optima Eyecare, Alpharetta, GA
  • Follow their social media and keep tabs on their Google marketing. — Travis LeFevre, Krystal Vision, Logan, UT
  • What collections are they carrying? Who just was bought out by MyEyeDoctor? — Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy & Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI
  • Sales, promos and marketing. — Laura Trudeau, Cornea and Contact Lens Institute, Edina, MN
  • I like to keep tabs on prices and their promotions. I sign up for their FB/IG news too so I know what they are doing. — Kim Hilgers, Monson Eyecare Center, Owatonna, MN
  • Just basic information to make sure that our office is not out of line with other private practitioners. — Leisa Lauer, Dr. H. Michael Shack, Newport Beach, FL
  • Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Cold call and see what the competition is offering and prices. — Jeff Grosekemper, Casa De Oro Eyecare, Spring Valley, CA
  • Keep eye on ads… price shop. — Rob Goedken, Fuerste Optical, Dubuque, IA
  • Stay informed on products and specials that they are offering. Try to compete by matching prices or giving better product. — Becki Martin, Harrington Vision Center II, Florence, SC

No: 65%

  • I only have time to worry about what I’m doing, never mind other people! — Larah Alami, OD, Hudson River Eye Care, Tarrytown, NY
  • We stay busy. — Fred Sirotkin, OD, Eagle Eye Care, Columbia, MD
  • No time. — Amy M. Farrall, OD, Vision Center of Delaware, Newark, DE
  • No time. — Susie Phillips, Dr. Brendon Johnson, O.D., Pekin, IL
  • Just doesn’t seem applicable. — Adam Doyle, Pearle Vision, Madison, AL
  • Our ‘competitors’ aren’t really competition. Instead we focus on product knowledge, customer service, and carrying gorgeous frames. — Kris Kittell, Torrey Highlands Optometry, San Diego, CA
  • The only thing I keep up with is what services other offices are offering to patients. That way, if a patient asks me about myopia control, I can refer them to a colleague. — Angie Patteson, OD Sunset Eye Care, Johnson City, TN
  • We do our own thing and we do it well. Our true competitors do the same, so I respect that. — Susan L. Spencer, Council Eye Care, Williamsville, NY
  • No time. — Nicole Heyduk, Eye centers of Northwest Ohio, Fremont, OH
  • Our boss doesn’t seem interested in knowing what the competitors are doing. — Joyce Paton, Village Eye Care, Raleigh, NC
  • Worry about your own circus. — Kevin Count, Prentice Lab, Glenview, IL
  • Too busy! Probably should though. — Kristina Swartz, The Eye Site, Mishawaka, IN
  • Four Walls Theory. (Look inside your four walls of operation for the elements that contribute to success or failure.) — Bret Hunter, Sports Optical, Denver, CO
  • I am so far ahead of them they would be slowing me down! — Adam Ramsey, OD, Socialite Vision, Palm Beach Gardens, FL
  • I seek quality and brands, they do not. — Sabina Krasnov, i2ioptique, Scottsdale, AZ
  • Not worried about them. — James Ernst, OD, Alexandria, KY
  • Busy running my own business. As we do not take insurance, we actually recommend our closest competitor for those Rxs. — Dianna Finisecy, Wagner Opticians, Washington, DC
  • I have no competition! Just businesses that think they are. — Dave Schultz, OD, Urban Optics, San Luis Obispo, CA
  • I can’t say I don’t check online advertising or see what Facebook has but that is pretty rare. I figure what they are doing should not alter my approach too much and sometimes you can chase a competitor down a wrong path. — Zachary Dirks, OD, St. Peter and Belle Plaine Eyecare Centers, Saint Peter, MN
  • Don’t have time to worry about others. We just do what we do. — Andrea Schall, Armstrong Eye Care, Kittanning, PA
  • I just do the best I can. — Ivy Elaine Frederick, OD, New Castle, PA
  • They should keep tabs on me. Too busy seeing patients to care what other practices are doing. — Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • A lot of big box offices around us and we are private practice. Our frame offerings are not the same and our exams are full detailed exams on every annual not just a refraction. I don’t feel we fall into the same category as most offices around us. — Lindsey Pulford, Insights Eyecare, Manhattan KS
  • No time for that. Too busy being spectacular! — Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY
  • No need, do you job and don’t work about anyone else. — Kenneth D Boltz, OD, Dublin, OH
  • No time. — Ann Gallagher, Professional Vision, Ellicott, MD
  • Other eyeglass places in town are not our competition. — Dave Goodrich, Goodrich Optical, Lansing, MI
  • If we do things right, we don’t have any competition… — Annette Prevaux, The Visionary Inc, Allen Park, MI
  • We’re are our greatest competitor! — Mark Perry, OD, Vision Health Institute, Orlando, FL
  • We are a downtown boutique style shop and have our own niche. — Elizabeth Hawkins, Summit Eye Health dba The Eye Station, Lees Summit, MO
  • Not sure how to do that. — Jessica Mitchell, Mitchell Eye Care, Starkville, MS
  • They need to keep tabs on me. — Michael Davis, OD, Opti-Care, Eldersburg, MD
  • We are such a small office that we don’t have time to check around. We do often asks patients, who purchase their glasses elsewhere, how much they paid for them. — Deanna Phillips, Clemmons Family Eye Care, Clemmons, NC
  • Many of the opticals have either closed down or have been bought out by corporate entities. Those changes have worked out well for us in the community. — Tim Gray, Visual Eyes, Huntingdon Valley, PA
  • We just don’t worry about our competitors. If we do our job well, then no need to worry. — Scott Keating, OD, Vision Trends, Dover, OH
  • We may ask our reps if others in the area are experiencing similarities, but we don’t actively snoop. — Selena Jachens, Urban Eyecare & Eyewear, West Des Moines, IA
  • Once in a blue moon we mystery shop, but we have to be waaaaay out of town, as everybody knows everybody here. — Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • It does us no justice in comparing anything in life. You do your best and set goals. — Betty Aretz, The Eyecare Boutique, Wexford, PA
  • Not enough time in the day! — Stephanie Crowley, Sie Eyecare, Charlotte, NC
  • We don’t have much competition. — Nichole Montavon, Oskaloosa Vision Center, Oskaloosa, LA

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

Continue Reading

Advertisement

Advertisement

Subscribe


BULLETINS

Get the most important news and business ideas for eyecare professionals every weekday from INVISION.

Advertisement

Most Popular