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Buzz Session

Eyecare People Share the Easiest Sale They Make in Their Businesses

‘Nike frames to teen boys.’

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We do a lot of industrial safety and the sales are driven by their employer sending them in. — Pam Housley, Texas State Optical of Nederland, Port Arthur, TX

  • Nike frames to teen boys. — Rick Rickgauer, Vision Associates, Girard, PA
  • Repeat customers. — BJ Chambers, Carrera Optical, McQueeney, TX
  • Plano suns. — Travis LeFevre, Krystal Vision, Logan, UT
  • Kids. — Daryl Wessner, Dr. Alethea Wessner, Pine Grove, PA
  • BOGO from Essilor. Button team and I will be SO happy when it’s over. It’s been a headache “I wasn’t extended this offer!” But they didn’t want Transitions, Eyezen, Crizal Sapphire. — Katie Kelly, Ochsner Optical, New Orleans, LA
  • ULP.— Pam Peters, Midwest Eye, Downers Grove, IL
  • Everything.— Nicole Heyduk, Eye centers of Northwest Ohio, Fremont, OH
  • Anti-Reflective coating!— Dave Schultz, Urban Optics, San Luis Obispo, CA
  • Ray-Ban and Oakley frames.— Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Assoc., Citrus Heights, CA
  • Annual supply of CL. — Mark Perry, OD, Vision Health Institute, Orlando, FL
  • AR. — John LaShorne, Brown County Eye Care, Nashville, IN
  • AR. — Bob McBeath, Edina Eye, Edina, MN
  • Anti-Glare/Blue light protection. — Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision, Edmond, OK
  • Women: 40-60. — Cindy Henderson, Eyear Optical, Hixson, TN
  • Minima eyewear. — Dave Goodrich, Goodrich Optical, Lansing, MI
  • AR. — Bryan Hartgrave, Vision Solutions, Lamar, MO
  • Our MODO line sells itself. Their lightweight and look fantastic. Patients simply try them on and love the fit. — Vlad Cordero, Focus Eye Care, Hackensack, NJ
  • Our easiest sale starts with our favorite returning patients who trust us to pick the right frame to make them look younger or better and then upon pick up seeing their satisfaction that that all is well with their vision, with the comment, “I can see clearly again!” Usually they finish with you always get it right! That’s why my family and I keep coming back. — Jill Sweig, OD, Oyster Bay Optics, Oyster Bay, NY
  • Nothing good comes easy. — Robert M. Easton, Jr., OD, FAAO, Oakland Park, FL
  • Ray-Ban. — Michelle Wright, DePoe Eye Center, Sharpsburg, GA
  • Anti-reflective coatings, we are around 90%. — Michael Martorana, OD, Falls City Eye Care, Louisville, KY
  • Anti-reflection coating. — Leisa Lauer, Dr. H Michael Shack, Newport Beach, FL
  • A/R coating, it’s 100% on private pay. — Caitlin Bruno, Binyon Vision Center, Bellingham, WA
  • Krewe! We love these styles and it makes it such an easy sale when the company offers a lifetime warranty. Anyone that warrants for a lifetime really stands by their product. — Leah Johnson, Central Texas Eye Center, San Marcos, TX
  • Back up spectacles for single vision contact lens wearers. — Shane Clark, Infinity EyeCare, Rapid City, SD
  • Second pair. — Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy & Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI
  • Moscot and WOOW. — Nancy Revis, Uber Optics, Petaluma, CA
  • Anything! You have to in the market and willing to pay the price. — Ron Catterson, Clear View Optix, The Villages, FL
  • Second pair suns, especially with our multiple pair deals. — Jenna Gilbertson, McCulley Optix Gallery, Fargo, ND
  • Anti-reflective. — Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • Etnia Barcelona or warm eye masks. — Nytarsha Thomas, OD, Visionelle Eyecare, Zionsville, IN
  • Anti-Reflective coating and Polarization. — Heather Harrington, Elevated Eyecare, Denver, CO
  • Occupational lenses following someone who only has an everyday progressive. These are a game changer and people are excited to spend the money on such a life changing solution. — Carissa Dunphy, Duvall Advanced Family Eyecare, Duvall, WA
  • A/R coating. It’s taken a while, but we’re now selling majority A/R. — Josh Bladh, Dr. Bladh OD, Diamond Bar, CA
  • ROGER Dutch Eyewear, because of their bright colors and amazing shapes, they attract the clients’ eyes first! — Elle Tatum, Elle’s Island Spectacle, Bainbridge Island, WA
  • Multiple pairs. Buy one, get one 50% off. — Cynthia Sayers, EyeShop Optical Center, Lewis Center, OH
  • Men’s Oakley ophthalmic frames. — Scott Keating, OD, Vision Trends, Dover, OH
  • Anti-Reflective Coating. — Cassandra Nash, HD Optical Express, Lansing, MI
  • AR. — Judith Whitelaw, Dr. Gregory Char, OD, Orange, OR
  • Polarized lenses. Once the patient sees the difference it can make, they have no problem with the extra expense. (Thanks, Maui Jim!) — Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • Sunglasses. — Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL
  • The Ultimate Lens offer has been a very easy sell for us. Getting patients who are already getting one pair with all the options and telling them they can get a second set with only a frame cost is huge for them. Especially patients that have VSP to cover most of their first pair. — Caitlin Wicka, San Juan Eye Center, Montrose, CO
  • Right now, it’s the Essilor Ultimate Lens Offer. — Lynn Geis, San Juan Eye Center, Montrose, CO
  • Louis Luso frames. We can’t keep them in stock. Tomato glasses because no one around us carries them. — Nikki Griffin, EyeStyles Optical and Boutique, Oakdale, MN
  • I always have an easy time selling non-glare coating. Not sure why. I just tell people why I love it and then they want it too. — Vicki Thompson, Grandville Optical, Grandville, MI
  • Someone who loses their glasses. — Susan Miller, Bright Eyes Vision, Hartsville, PA
  • Value packages. We have a HEV blue light filtering lenses we sell well at a great price. This value and it’s benefits for reducing eye fatigue and strain help the patient and makes for an easy sale. — William Chancellor, Eye Can See Eyewear, McDonough, GA
  • Ray-Ban. — Gene Gillan, Rush Henrietta Opticians, Henrietta, NY
  • The majority of patients with VSP are the easiest sell because they have the best coverage. — Deanna Phillips, Clemmons Family Eye Care, Clemmons, NC
  • People who want exactly the same thing they had the last time. They just want a backup pair. — Frances Ann Layton, Eye Associates of South GA, Valdosta, GA
  • AR. J— ill Schnurer, OD, Village Eyecare Co., Clarkston, MI
  • We Love Eyes. — Sarah Jerome, OD, Look+See Eye Care, Minneapolis, MN
  • Computer glasses. I wear them, I preach them. — Annette Prevaux-Matejko, The Visionary, Allen Park, MI
  • The easiest sale is A/R. I mention to every patient that it’s part of the lens package. I rarely have any objections to the benefits that it offers. — Mitch Kaufman, Marine Park Family Vision, Brooklyn, NY
  • Customers come in anticipating a glasses or contact lens purchase. It’s never hard to deliver on the minimum expectation. Real selling involves not just meeting those limited consumer expectations, but identifying other unmet needs like prescription sunglasses or a set of computer lenses. — Becky Furuta, Avenue Vision, Golden, CO
  • AR Coating. — Susie Phillips, Dr. Brendon Johnson, O.D., Pekin, IL
  • Computer glasses are the easiest sale. Everyone works on computers. — Jade Kowalick, Ryczek Eye Associates, St. Petersburg, FL
  • ECO – so lightweight and low-cost it’s a no-brainer. — Larah Alami, OD, Hudson River Eye Care, White Plains, NY

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

Since launching in 2014, INVISION has won 21 international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact INVISION's editors at editor@invisionmag.com.

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Buzz Session

Do Over: If Given the Chance This is What You Would Do Differently

More education, earlier ownership and trusting your gut more were all pretty popular.

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  • Achieve OD or by GODS blessed MD status. — Steven Gouveia, Target Optical, Seekkonk, MA
  • Briefly?? I’d learn from other people’s mistakes and trust my gut a little more. — Josh Bladh, Dr. Bladh OD, Diamond Bar, CA
  • Run my business without ODs. — John LaShorne, Brown County Eye Care, Nashville, IN
  • I would have started making my own frames much earlier. — Kevin Count, Prentice Lab, Glenview, IL
  • Hire the personality and then train them. I have always wished for a complete training program, opposed to a ‘sink or swim method,’ prior to ever allowing the new staffer to assist patients. — Pam Housley, Texas State Optical of Nederland, Port Arthur, TX
  • I would have started in optical sooner. I kind of fell into this position and now I love it! — Andrea Schall, Armstrong Eye Care, Kittanning, PA
  • So many costly mistakes that I don’t even know where to start! (From marketing to frame selection to working with vendors and consultants, hindsight is definitely 20/20.) — Nytarsha Thomas, OD, Visionelle Eyecare, Zionsville, IN
  • Get everything in writing. — Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy & Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI
  • Stay in school and participate in activities. — Mitchell Kaufman, Marine Park Family Vision, Brooklyn, NY
  • Profit first. My heck if had only known, I would have carved every penny I earned up and allocated it accordingly. It’s like bumper bowling for expenses. — Nikki Griffin, EyeStyles Optical and Boutique, Oakdale, MN
  • Go into a different field. — Greg Kyser, Gallery of Eyewear, Marysville, WA
  • Go bigger and push for my goals instead of playing it safe! — Stacey Nutting, The Eye Doctors at CNY Eye Care, East Syracuse, NY
  • Change majors in college instead of completely dropping out. It took 15 years before I went back. — Frances Ann Layton, Eye Associates of South GA, Valdosta, GA
  • Take school seriously! Ron Catterson, Clear View Optix, The Villages, FL
  • I would buy an established practice instead of starting cold. Might have given me a bit of a head start with a steady patient base. — Tom Brillante, OD, Decatur Eye Care, Decatur, GA
  • Went to a four-year college instead of a two-year technical. — Caitlin Wicka, San Juan Eye Center, Montrose, CO
  • Listen to my gut! — Michelle Wright, DePoe Eye Center, Sharpsburg, GA
  • Believe in myself and my vision. (No pun intended) — Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision, Edmond, OK
  • Paid closer attention to the acoustics in our optical. — James Armstrong, Alberta Eye Care, Portland, OR
  • Get my ABO sooner. — Heather Harrington, Elevated Eyecare, Denver, CO
  • I would have become an optician earlier than I did. — Dorothy Reynolds, Optical Alternatives, Milford, CT
  • I would’ve made the jump from corporate opticianry to private sooner. — Vlad Cordero, Focus Eye Care PC, Hackensack, NJ
  • Do it my way from the beginning and start earlier. Take more time not seeing patients to work on office things. — Zachary Dirks, OD, St. Peter and Belle Plaine Eyecare Centers, Saint Peter, MN
  • Start sooner. — Rick Pascucci, Towpath Vision Care, Clinton, NY
  • Stay working in a lab instead of an office. — Judith Whitelaw, Dr. Gregory Char, OD, Orange, OR
  • Start at the practice I’m at now. The other place was owned by a psycho Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde situation. Y’all know what I mean. — Jeff Grosekemper, Casa De Oro Eyecare, Spring Valley, CA
  • I am so happy with my life now and I believe that for every action there is a reaction if I did anything differently my life may not be this good. I have a most remarkable family with grandkids and great in-laws. Nothing could be better. — Bob McBeath, Edina Eye, Edina, MN
  • I’m not sure how to answer that. — Annie Thompson, Lawrence Eye Care Optical, Lawrence, KS
  • Speak my mind more. — Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • Gone to optometry school. — Doreen Erbe, Snyder Eye Group, Ship Bottom, NJ
  • Larger office. — BJ Chambers, Carrera Optical, McQueeney, TX
  • I would not buy a practice based on good will. I would purchase real estate and build a practice rather than rent. — Pauline Buck, OD, Behavioral and Developmental Optometrists, Miami, FL
  • Lose the partners and buy my own building. Rents are killing. — Jill Sweig, OD, Oyster Bay Optics, Oyster Bay, NY
  • I wouldn’t do any of it differently. I feel my life works exactly the way it’s supposed to and I’m in the exact place I’m supposed to be. — Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL
  • I would have stayed in U.S. Army Reserves and retired from the Reserves in 1985. — Texas L. Smith, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • In the latter part of my military career I wanted to go into flight school, but a deployment to Iraq as a flight medic changed my mind. I wouldn’t mind going back and become a pilot! — William Chancellor, Eye Can See Eyewear, McDonough, GA
  • Become licensed much, much sooner. — Pablo E Mercado, LensCrafters, Alpharetta, GA
  • I wouldn’t have taken time off school after high school. — Nicole Heyduk, Eye Centers of Northwest Ohio, Fremont, OH
  • My hobby is bidding at storage locker auctions. If I could do it all over again, I would start working in the auction business fresh out of high school and maybe have retired already! — Marc Ullman, OD, Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NJ
  • Go to optometry school. — Scott Felten, Fox Valley Family Eye Care, Little Chute, WI
  • Absolutely, positively nothing! — Mark Perry, OD, Vision Health Institute, Orlando, FL
  • Would have done a residency. — Dennis Iadarola, OD, Center for Vision Care, Monroe, CT
  • I would not have gotten pregnant during my first semester of college. — Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • I would have gotten my license earlier on in my career. — Christine Howard, Attleboro Vision Care, Attleboro, MA
  • Stayed in college. — Rick Rickgauer, Vision Associates, Girard, PA
  • Opened my unique eyewear optical much, much sooner! It’s so fun styling customers in unique eyewear and they come back to us so happy to be our “eyewear models.” — Scott Keating, OD, Vision Trends, Dover, OH
  • I’m not sure. — Vicki Thompson, Grandville Optical, Grandville, MI
  • Nothing! I love what every experience and challenge teaches me. — Amina Ebrahim, OD, D Vision Eyecare, Allen, TX
  • I would have picked my mentor’s brain on the business of running an optometric practice. — Kimberly Riggs, OD, Ligonier, PA
  • Make more money. — Katie Rutledge, Arnold Family Eyecare, Imperial, MO
  • Go to optical school sooner. — Harris Decker, Eye Designs of Westchester, Scarsdale, NY
  • Go to optometry school. — David Saxton, Kern Optical, Gulfport, MS
  • Take the ownership plunge sooner. — Gerald Koss, Vision Source Partners, Fernandina Beach, FL
  • Not worry so much about what other people think and listen to my own instincts. — Bethany Cassar, Complete Eye Health, Holland, MI
  • More education. — Dave Goodrich, Goodrich Optical, Lansing, MI
  • I would have computerized sooner. People are impressed with technology even though it baffles me sometimes. When it works, it is amazing how much time and energy it saves. — Annette Prevaux, The Visionary, Allen Park, MI
  • I’m doing it. Our new office that we opened to be closer to our kids and granddaughter has more social marketing and we are using iPads for most everything involved with patients. — Richard Frankel, Atlantic Cape Eyecare, Wildwood, NJ
  • Not trust so many of our peers when purchasing used equipment. — Cassandra Brackmann, Danville Family Eye Care, Danville, IN
  • A few mistakes along the way… changed the original career choice that I never followed. — Susie Phillips, Dr. Brendon Johnson, O.D., Pekin, IL
  • I would have gone to optometry school. — Gail Bailey, Eye Care Clinic, Grand Rapids, MN
  • I would have done a residency, I would love to teach. — Chani Miller, OD, Park Eye Center, Highland Park, NJ
  • Never work Saturdays, be with family instead. — Hagen Eye Care, Miami, FL
  • Try to learn how to buy effectively earlier on. Also get a better background in marketing. — Travis LeFevre, Krystal Vision, Logan, UT
  • Be more proactive and present in the day to day operation. Staying off “autopilot.” — Jim Williams, Eye To Eye, Mexico, MO
  • I would have been more open minded about my goals. — Jessica Brundidge, Clarity Vision, Clayton, NC

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

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Buzz Session

Reply? Ignore? Here’s How Readers Land on Dealing with a Negative Review

And congrats to those who have never received one!

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  • Stick your head in the sand and they will go away! — Mark Perry, OD, Vision Health Institute, Orlando, FL
  • Reply, briefly, courteously, and try and fix the problem as best we can. We try and let the patient “win” if at all possible even if it costs us some money. — Kenneth D Boltz, OD, Dublin, OH
  • What is this thing called a “bad review?” — David Kirscher, OD, Island Family Eyecare, Bainbridge Island, WA
  • Reply with kindness. — Steve Geis, Metro Eye, Milwaukee, WI
  • Humor. — John LaShorne, Brown County Eye Care, Nashville, IN
  • Try and figure out what went wrong, contact the person to try and rectify the situation. — Frances Ann Layton, Eye Associates of South Georgia, Valdosta, GA
  • Be honest. Apologize, if what the patient says is true. Always take the high road. — Cynthia Sayers, OD, EyeShop Optical Center, Lewis Center, OH
  • Don’t get them in the first place. We’ll do almost anything to make sure customers leave happy. — Harris Decker, Eye Designs Of Westchester, Scarsdale, NY
  • Ignore. — Dawn Limauro, Lens Doctors, Dover, NH
  • Handle on an individual basis. — Leisa Lauer, Dr. H Michael Shack, Newport Beach, FL
  • Thank the patient for their input. We do not get defensive. — Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • Reply professionally, and possibly assess the situation if necessary to make things right. — Heather Harrington, Elevated Eyecare, Denver, CO
  • Fortunately, we’ve only ever had one, and just let it go. — Lynn Geis, San Juan Eye Center, Montrose, CO
  • Not getting them. — Sabina Krasnov, i2ioptique, Scottsdale, AZ
  • Kill them with kindness! We’d call them and see what we could do to make things right. — Jade Kowalick, Ryczek Eye, St Petersburg , FL
  • Head on. — Jill Sweig, OD, Oyster Bay Optics, Oyster Bay, NY
  • Look into it first to make sure the complaint can be taken care of. If it can, fix it. If it’s not legitimate, don’t worry. Everyone that reads the review probably knows the person is never satisfied anywhere! — Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • I can happily say I haven’t had any. I do have clients obviously that come in that are not happy with what they purchased and you have to figure you’re not going to please everybody. You bless them and send them on their way. — Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL
  • Consider it constructive criticism. — Katie Rutledge, Arnold Family Eyecare, Imperial, MO
  • We try to follow up with each patient who left us a bad review and resolve what we can, always remembering that every aspect of our business ‑ our outside labs, vendors etc.… — are all an extension of who we are. You cannot resolve any issues by doing the “blame game!” — Jessica Brundidge, Clarity Vision, Clayton, NC
  • Good question, usually it was an employee that was fired and went online and you can’t fix stupid. — Betty Aretz, The Eyecare Boutique, Wexford, PA
  • Reaching out and attempting to better the negative feeling the patient developed for one reason or another. — William Chancellor, Eye Can See Eyewear, McDonough, GA
  • Respond in a professional manner and always give the option to call or come in and talk to the owner/manager. — Travis LeFevre, Krystal Vision, Logan, UT
  • Try to answer the person’s complaints honestly without getting hostile. If you or your staff slipped up, own up to the mistake and try to make it right (refunds, etc.) If the patient got it wrong, try to gently point out their mistake (so that future readers can see both sides). I still do try and appease the patients that got it wrong — generally with a small discount — with the hope that they will return. If they make the same accusations a second time, then I dismiss them. — Tom Brillante, OD, Decatur Eye Care, Decatur, GA
  • I never received a bad revue. If I did I would find out the source to see if it was credible. — BJ Chambers, Carrera Optical, McQueeney, TX
  • Don’t get them to begin with. — Harry Roth, eyeQ Opticians, Millburn, NJ
  • Address them, internally and externally. — Dave Goodrich, Goodrich Optical, Lansing, MI
  • Just move on… — Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy & Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI
  • Deal with it immediately. Contact the patient directly. Apologize. Listen. Fix the problem. — Lee Dodge, OD, Visualeyes Optometry, Sherman Oaks, CA
  • Reach out to the patient, find a solution and try and work to resolve the review. — Bryan Hartgrave, Vision Solutions, Lamar, MO
  • I personally contact the patient to see if we can work out the problem. Our Rxs have a six-month warranty or money back if problem cannot be fixed. Have been pretty lucky with reviews so far. — Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • Reach out to patient to see what can be done to turn it around. — Judith Whitelaw, Dr. Gregory Char, OD, Orange, OR
  • Address them and apologize if it was our fault and even if it wasn’t spin the apology so that the intelligent reader will realize that the complaint is ridiculous. — Cindy Henderson, Eyear Optical, Hixson, TN
  • Straight on. We aren’t perfect. — Bethany Cassar, Complete Eye Health, Holland, MI
  • Just let them ride. They are seeking attention, and I am not looking to encourage negative attention! — Bridgett Fredrickson, Whelan Eye Care, Bemidji, MN
  • The number one thing is to avoid them at all cost. Learn from your mistakes as no one is perfect. Address the issue BEFORE it gets to a bad review. You inherently know when a “possible” bad review is coming. Head it off at the pass. And “if” you get a bad review address it immediately ….do not wait. Call the customer and try and make it right. If you feel the review was unfair, write a rebuttal that is FACT based. Leave all the emotion out of it. Leave your ego out of it. Do the right thing. — Steve Nelson, Eye Candy Optical, Westlake, OH

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

Continue Reading

Buzz Session

Eyecare People Reveal the Menial Tasks They Hate the Most

No. 1 on the most-despised list: cleaning.

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THIS MONTH’S QUESTION

What is the one necessary, menial task that has to get done in your office that everyone hates doing?

Putting away trial contact lenses. — Elizabeth Atkinson, OD, Atkinson Eye Care, Algonquin, IL

  • Voicemails. — Katie Kelly, Ochsner Optical, New Orleans, LA
  • Inventory. — Michael McConnell, Sight Optical, Grand Rapids, MI
  • Putting water in the fish tank when its low. I hate it when it’s even 3/8” low. I think I’m the only one that notices. — Julie Kubsch, Specs Around Town, Bloomington, IL
  • Filing. Filing. Filing. Also, yearly inventory and cleaning. — Harris Decker, Eye Designs of Westchester, Scarsdale, NY
  • Cleaning demo lenses and display shelves. Ugh. — Renee Berry, Nappanee Family Eyecare, Nappanee, IN
  • That’s an easy one: collect the garbage. And I am sure that at times they would like to include me in it! — Mark Perry, OD, Vision Health Institute, Orlando, FL
  • Cleaning the toilet. — Rick Rickgauer, Vision Associates, Girard, PA
  • Answering the telephone. — Charlene Gordon, Family Eye Care, Monroe, LA
  • Cleaning demo lenses. It never ends! — Jenna Gilbertson, McCulley Optix Gallery, Fargo, ND
  • Reminder phone calls for the next day. — Susie Phillips, Dr. Brendon Johnson, OD, Pekin, IL
  • MIPS/MACRA. — Fred Sirotkin, OD, Eagle Eye Care, Columbia, MD
  • Calling back that one patient that has had three redos and nothing seems to help their vision. — Lee Dodge, OD, Visualeyes Optometry, Sherman Oaks, CA
  • Recalls … actually calling patients when they are over two years past due. — Betty Aretz, The Eyecare Boutique,Wexford, PA
  • Taking the garbage out! — Caitlin Bruno, Binyon Vision Center, Bellingham, WA
  • Cleaning demo lenses! But it’s necessary so patients aren’t trying on frames with fingerprint-covered lenses. Yuck. — Cassandra Nash, HD Optical Express, Lansing, MI
  • Stamps and labels for recall cards and statements. — Brad J. Dobson, OD, Bee Cave Vision Center, Bee Cave, TX
  • Keeping stats. — Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • Scanning in paper files to our new software. — Travis LeFevre, Krystal Vision, Logan, UT
  • Cannot really put my finger on one task but I assure you I am the one that does it. — Leisa Lauer, Dr. H Michael Shack, Newport Beach, FL
  • Making sure all the financials match at the end of the day. It’s always a hold your breath moment. — Dr. Chani Miller, Park Eye Center, Highland Park, NJ
  • Contact lens trial inventory. — Larah Alami, OD, Hudson River Eye Care, Tarrytown, NY
  • Putting away lab sheets after we dispense. We are still on paper!— Jim Williams, Eye to Eye, Mexico, MO
  • Dusting. — Marc Ullman, OD, Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NJ
  • Putting away contact lens trials. The worst! — Katie Gillenwalters, Clifton Park Eye Care Associates, Clifton Park, NY
  • Clean the bathrooms. — John LaShorne, Brown County Eye Care, Nashville, IN
  • Cleaning the frames on display! — Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision, Edmond, OK
  • Taking out the trash. I have seen more fights break out over this one thing than any other chore in the office. It is like those who are doing it think it is beneath them. To counter this I try (note the word “try”) to get caught taking out the trash on a regular basis. The war has subsided some. — Ted A. McElroy, OD, Vision Source Tifton, Tifton, GA
  • Dusting the optical department. — Pam Peters, Midwest Eye, Downers Grove, IL
  • Cleaning. — Cynthia Sayers, OD, EyeShop Optical Center, Lewis Center, OH
  • The usual… no one like to wipe down frames but it must be done! — Steve Nelson, Eye Candy Optical, Westlake, OH
  • Filing. — Kevin Count, Prentice Lab, Glenview, IL
  • Filing. — Barbara Bloom, OD, Weber Vision Care, Harrisburg, PA
  • Cleaning the bathroom/taking the trash out. — Ron Catterson, Clear View Optix, The Villages, FL
  • Clean the store room, defrost freezers. — Bob McBeath, Edina Eye, Edina, MN
  • Cleaning! — BJ Chambers, Carrera Optical, McQueeney, TX
  • Dusting. — Deanna Phillips, Clemmons Family Eye Care, Clemmons, NC
  • Cleaning. — Bethany Cassar, OD, Complete Eye Health, Holland, MI
  • Cleaning frames. — Jocelyn Mylott, D’Ambrosio Eye Care, Lancaster, MA
  • Filing. — Gene Gillan, Rush Henrietta Opticians, Henrietta, NY
  • Cleaning and dusting the frames and shelves. — Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • Cleaning demo lenses. — Aaron Baker, McKinney Eyeworks, McKinney, TX
  • Recall. — Rick Pascucci, Towpath Vision Care, Clinton, NY
  • Pricing product what the patient owes in front of them after accounting for vision benefit coverage. — Michael Davis, OD, Opti-Care, Eldersburg, MD
  • Inventory. — Jill Schnurer, OD, Village Eyecare Co., Clarkston, MI
  • Cleaning the bathroom. — Kimberly Riggs OD, Ligonier, PA
  • Cleaning. — Cedric Mitsui, OD, Big Island Vision Center, Hilo, HI
  • DUSTING! We have lots of glass shelves; it’s a never-ending job. — Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy & Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI
  • Cleaning glass…never ending cleaning the glass. — Zachary Dirks, OD, St. Peter and Belle Plaine Eyecare Centers, Saint Peter, MN
  • Clean the bathroom. — Judith Whitelaw, Dr. Gregory Char, OD, Orange, CA
  • Email. — Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY
  • Cleaning the frames, no one enjoys that task! — Doreen Erbe, Snyder Eye Group, Ship Bottom, NJ
  • Dusting. — Nancy Revis, Uber Optics, Petaluma, CA
  • Filing and cleaning. — Dorothy Reynolds, Optical Alternatives, Milford, CT
  • Dusting our glass shelves. — Dave Schultz, OD, Urban Optics, San Luis Obispo, CA
  • Recalling patients. — Kaleena Ma, MK Vision Center, Forest Hills, NY
  • Filing cards. — Steve Whitaker, Whitaker Eye Works, Wayne, PA
  • Taking out the trash. — Adrian Katschke, WyoVision Associates of Gillette, Gillette, WY
  • Confirming appointments. — Pam Housley, Texas State Optical of Nederland, Port Arthur, TX
  • Pulling insurance benefits. — Theodore Sees, OD, Rockford Family Eyecare, Rockford, MI
  • Dusting and inventory. — Nikki Griffin, EyeStyles Optical and Boutique, Oakdale, MN
  • Cleaning the bathroom. — Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • Closing out all the jobs in the computer system. — Pablo E Mercado, Mount Vernon Eyecare, Dunwoody, GA
  • Vacuuming. — Alexander Saper, Great Glasses, Houston, TX
  • I do not like dusting my store especially the front window and the lock display case. I have sand on the floor in my business and it’s great to have a lot of customers but the more you have the more dust there seems to be; it’s endless. — Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL
  • Inventory. In a computerized system, new frames are constantly having to be added to the system, priced and tagged. — Dave Goodrich, Goodrich Optical, Lansing, MI
  • Cleaning the restroom. Why something so simple turns into a HUGE headache I’ll never understand… — William Chancellor, Eye Can See Eyewear, McDonough, GA
  • Picking up the toys in the waiting room. — Pauline Buck, OD, Behavioral and Developmental Optometrists, Miami, FL
  • Being the one and only person in my shop, I hate cleaning but it’s a necessary evil to maintain a clean store. — Mitchell Kaufman, Marine Park Family Vision, Brooklyn, NY
  • Cleaning and dusting glasses. — Amina, Ebrahim, OD, D Vision Eyecare, Allen, TX
  • Dusting the glass shelves! We can’t ever seem to find an absolutely perfect technique that doesn’t leave bits of “dusties” behind. And, of course, cleaning the bathroom and the staff kitchen. — Jen Heller, Pend Oreille Vision Care, Sandpoint, ID
  • Pricing frames. — Jeff Grosekemper, Casa De Oro Eyecare, Spring Valley, CA
  • Cleaning frames, seems like such an easy thing to do, however, when you have hundreds of them and lots of people touching them during the week it seems to be a daunting task that never ends. Caitlin Wicka, San Juan Eye Center, Montrose, CO
  • Insurance billing/reconciliation! Yuck. — Joey Burnett, Joey’s Optical, Marshfield, WI
  • Taking out trash. — Cindy Henderson, Eyear Optical, Hixson, TN
  • Take the trash out. — Scott Keating, OD, Vision Trends, Dover, OH
  • Cleaning out the coffee pot. — Frances Ann Layton, Eye Associates of South Georgia, Valdosta, GA
  • Cleaning demo lenses. — Stephanie Crowley, Sie Eyecare, Charlotte, NC
  • Cleaning. — Sandy Freise, The Optical Shop, St Charles, MO
  • Cleaning demos. — Monica Tracey, MED/Drs. Record and Record, Charlottesville, VA

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

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