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NO TWO independent optical shops are the same. While many of you live and die by the eye and nothing but the eye, some have interests far broader than just selling eyeglasses. Not to mention that businesses, by necessity, are becoming more inventive about how to get customers to come into their shops.  A more immersive and expansive in-store experience via a hybrid retail model helps make visiting the store itself more important; while combining the sale of eyewear with other products can make for a very interesting business model. Following are three optical retail outfits putting their own stamp on hybrid selling and adapting it to suit their brand.

 

 

THE CURATORS

In a venue that feels as much like an art gallery as a retail space, Atelier Mira in Williamsburg, Brooklyn opened by Rama and Assia Valentin in March 2016, carries a curated selection of five luxury brands in addition to their independent eyewear offerings. According to general manager Erin Rae, the store carries three leather goods brands, a fragrance line, and a collectable home decor design brand. “We are primarily an optical shop, so the approximate ratio is 75 percent optical and 25 percent other goods,” says Rae. “Also, Rama and Assia’s dear friend Guillaume Paturel made a painting that hangs in the entrance of our space. It is for sale, so we always mention that his art work is for sale.” The products they carry are all thanks to personal connections to the manufacturers or designers, and craftsmen. “Rama and Assia have an affinity for objects with quality craftsmanship and originality that only few designs can qualify as. All the products we sell are things that they have discovered and fell in love with… limited in availability and honorable in quality. They have strong opinions about style and keen eyes for design like true tastemakers do, so these criteria extend to almost everything in the store,” adds Rae. It was a conscious decision to offer a broader range of products from day one. “Having something else to talk about with our customer in the one-on-one experience makes it a bit more lighthearted and varied… It lightens the mood and makes it a more personal relationship instead of us just trying to sell you something,” explains Rae.

Their concept is so strong, in fact, someone even wanted to buy it. “We had an entrepreneur come in from China who wanted to buy our concept and replicate it (he wanted to buy Assia as well!),” shares Rae. “He had just never seen anything like it before and wanted to replicate our story exactly in his department store in China.”

 

THE OG

 Selima Salaun opened her first boutique on Wooster and Broome in NYC’s SoHo neighborhood in 1993 and Bond 07, her NoHo boutique, in 1998, making her a true OG of concept stores. Though all of her six stores sell non-optical products, it’s her Bond 07 store that takes it to the next level. Besides eyewear, at Bond 07 they sell vintage clothes, handbags, jewelry, scarves, accessories, and home goods from Hermes, Gucci, Saint Laurent, Chanel and other designers. According to Salaun, about 70 percent is eyewear and 30 percent is vintage clothes and accessories. “I have always been a passionate collector of vintage clothes, accessories and furniture,” says Salaun. “Most pieces we carry at Bond 07 are more or less a selection of items I find while traveling or browsing through vintage stores or fairs. Everyplace I go I try to find something new and if they do well we carry them over from season to season. We have jewelry staples customers can always count on us for.”

For Salaun the goal is to offer her customers an experience. “It’s exciting and different to not only find a great pair of glasses, but also an accessory or outfit, which goes well with your new pair of glasses. It can be a challenge to continuously change the product assortment and being able to surprise your clients with great new pieces.” But not every product has been a hit. “I have sold so many different categories in my stores including perfume, dishes, luxury olive oil and nail polish. One day, a lady drove me crazy asking for help choosing a color of nail polish. I swear I spent as much time selecting a color for her as choosing the perfect pair of glasses. I tried to convince her to buy a few but she refused. That day, I took all the nail polish out of the store and decided to never sell anything below $20 again.”

 

THE ONE STOP SHOP

Vivencio Austero had a dream. Spektkle is the manifestation of that dream. “My dream has always been to provide the highest quality product, gently priced while supporting small independent frame designers,” says Austero. “Adding small independent labs … brings it all together; customized service, technology and uniqueness in eyewear.” The trick was finding the place to make that dream a reality; eight months ago he did. “I wanted to be different, so I was considering everything out of the norm,” he explains. “The idea of shared space popped up and seemed to fit; it was flexible, people were seeking out the shop, they are open to new ideas. It didn’t take us long to find GingyGems.” He shares a space inside a country marketplace and thrift store, which enables him to provide a friendly retail setting. “My business definitely benefits from the traffic GingyGems brings. Patti Cohen, the owner, will always let her customers know there is a new optical shop sharing space in her store. Likewise, I tell people I meet when I’m networking that I share space inside GingyGems.” Being located in a thrift store presents a very special challenge. “Since I am in a location where ‘everything’ is for sale, I get a lot of offers for some of my displays. Before I even opened, I had more than one offer for a beautiful oak cabinet I use as a desk. One of my funniest challenges is keeping my wife from pricing all my displays to stimulate cash flow.”

Since launching in 2014, INVISION has won 23 international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact INVISION's editors at editor@invisionmag.com.

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America's Finest

A Simple Formula Keeps This Vancouver Optical Growing After 40 Years

They created a safe space for self-expression.

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The Optical Boutique, Vancouver, British Columbia

OWNER: Sue Randhawa; URL:theopticalboutique.com ; FOUNDED: 1979; EMPLOYEES: 2 full-time, 1 part-time ; AREA: 1,000 sq. ft.; TOP BRANDS: Anne et Valentin, Theo, Jacques Marie Mage, Face á Face, LPLR ; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/theopticalboutique; INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/theopticalboutique


Randhawa enjoys the juxtaposition of antique or vintage aesthetics and The Optical Boutique’s fashion-forward frames.

THE OPTICAL BOUTIQUE was founded in 1979 and quickly became a key destination for eyewear connoisseurs in Vancouver. Sue Randhawa worked alongside the original owners for 15 years before purchasing the business in 2007. Having already built a rapport with the clientele, she opted for a minor update rather than a wholesale reinvention. But that would soon be forced upon her when the building management unexpectedly invoked a clause in the lease that allowed them to tear the site down for a complete rebuild. “What began as an unfortunate circumstance evolved into an awesome opportunity. I was involved in the entire design process [of the new store]. It was amazing to be able to see my vision for the space become a reality.”

The Optical Boutique is unmistakably the expression of a personality, rather than the sleek product of a design consultancy. Frames reside in antique draws, set off by vintage signage; they’re draped over old books with cracked spines and perched atop ancient typewriters. Randhawa’s touch is evident in large features like the store’s brick accent wall, its display cabinets, and the antiques she collects during frame-buying trips. She particularly enjoys the juxtaposition of antique or vintage aesthetics and The Optical Boutique’s fashion-forward frames.

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Randhawa tries to travel at least twice a year to European shows for buying and chooses selections with her diverse clientele in mind. “I choose collections that are handmade, unique, colorful, and whenever possible logo-free.”

The store is located in Kerrisdale, a “tight-knit” community, in Randhawa’s words, on Vancouver’s West Side that skews to the older and wealthier, though The Optical Boutique has established a city-wide reputation and is drawing a growing number of people from other demographics and neighborhoods thanks to its well-tended online presence. “Our average client is around 60-70 years old and is anything but typical. One of the things we hear often in the store is how diverse our collection is,” she says. “We often have clients in the neighborhood who come in with their friends to get a minor adjustment and end up staying to visit and browse.”

The team at The Optical Boutique strives for a nurturing environment. “We encourage positive self-talk, as the majority of people, when confronted with a mirror, become their own biggest critic. This type of service does not go unnoticed as we receive numerous recommendations based on the experience we provide.” So numerous, in fact, that Randhawa doesn’t really bother with traditional marketing. “We have spent 40 years sticking to our simple business model — to sell quality products at a reasonable price and focus on providing the best customer service possible,” she says. “It speaks volumes to us that we get most of our new clients from them seeing and loving our eyewear on existing clients and being referred in to us.”

Having said that, she does have a strong presence on social media. “I really do try to follow a posting schedule, but I find that my organic posts, the ones that I share because I like something about the image, seem to resonate more.” The store’s Facebook and Instagram accounts reflect Randhawa’s deep engagement with the local fashion scene. “The images I post illustrate the way we work; each person is different and has their own fashion journey. I like to show other women they can have fun with their eyewear.”

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Randhawa credits her staff of “unique and complementary individuals. Each has their own perspective, style, taste, and personality. I love that we all bring different strengths to the table. Some days it feels like we spend more time laughing than working.”

It says a lot about Randhawa’s achievement at The Optical Boutique that to her, entering the store “feels like coming home. I have had clients tell me it feels more like visiting a friend than an optical store. This is a place where clients become friends and people feel safe to express themselves.”

PHOTO GALLERY (13 IMAGES)

Five Cool Things About The Optical Boutique

1. MATCH MAKER. Randhawa has relationships with all of Vancouver’s major lens manufacturers “so we have the diversity to find the right lens on an individual basis.”

2. FASHION FIXTURE. The team are regulars at Vancouver Fashion Week. “I love seeing the designers’ concepts come to life. It’s so much fun to be a part of their journey and to collaborate with them.”

3. INFLUENCER. @theopticalboutique was voted one of the “Top 25 Vancouver Fashion Instagram accounts to follow” by a local online newspaper.

4. DOOR-TO-DOOR. Randhawa makes house calls. Sometimes with a small collection of frames to do a complete fit in the home, other times just to say hi. “It’s a lovely interlude in my day.”

5. GIVING BACK. Every year the business provides a scholarship to an emerging designer or student who shows at Fashion Week.

WHAT THE JUDGES SAID

  • Sue’s love of fashion and eyewear is evident; but what strikes me even more is her desire to help patients discover their personal style: “Each person is different and has their own fashion journey.” Nathan Troxell, PPG, Monroeville, PA
  • Sue’s passion and enthusiasm for quality, individuality and culture clearly translate into a unique story with a strong dose of personality — all with a distinct point of view. Stirling Barrett, KREWE, New Orleans, LA
  • There are some awesomely creative things about this shop — and the social media looks as slick and cool as the website. Leigh and Todd Rogers Berberian, Todd Rogers Eyewear, Andover, MA
  • The best marketing tool The Optical Boutique has is Sue. Her active involvement in the local fashion scene and her unique and eclectic style provide amazing PR that cannot be bought. Beverly Suliteanu, Westgroupe, Ville St-Laurent, Québec, Canada

 

Fine Story

Randhawa and her team have worked hard to disabuse their clientele of the idea that they have to match their eyewear to their clothes. “For so long people have been worried that their new glasses won’t ‘go’ with what they’ve got in their wardrobe, but this has to stop,” she says. “We try to educate each client that our goal is for the eyewear to be harmonious with their own coloring, and that means they won’t have to worry about matching it. In fact, sometimes having a contrasting color can be quite striking.” Randhawa tries to show through her own eyewear that glasses can be an excellent way to make a statement, add some color to a complexion, or even elevate an outfit. “I think what we’ve created at The Optical Boutique is a safe space for people to try to test their own boundaries and explore their inner creativity in a way they might not have even considered before,” she says.

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Finish Strong, Start Stronger

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How you finish the year has a major impact on how you start the next one. Year-end is a tricky, busy time. You need to be maximizing the long holiday season and flex spending, evaluating your performance for the year, assessing inventory and store needs and setting new goals, all while rewarding your team for a job well done and inspiring them for the year ahead.

We asked four industry experts (see bios on page 43) to break down the remainder of 2019 for optical business owners and offer some advice on what they should be thinking about in the weeks and months ahead. We also collected some hot takes from our Brain Squad members, who gave us a sense of their fall and winter plans. Here’s our three-month guide to kick-starting a new cycle of success.

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90 Days Out…

Planning and marketing late-year events, reaching out to clients, drafting a 2020 strategy and capturing flex dollars should be on your mind.

MICHAEL KARLSRUD
founder, Karlsrüd Company

Before you set about planning for peak performance, Karlsrud says it’s good to set a few ground rules:

Any business or practice without a plan is like a ship without a rudder. Think through opportunities and challenges in the areas of business performance, managing employees, and serving patients through what can be a very chaotic time. Also, remember to keep score. Establish key performance indicators (KPIs) that measure the behavior required to accomplish the goals laid out. They should be easy to track and easily understood. Post them for all to see and keep score on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. Reward accordingly for earned success. Finally, when it comes to major business goals, limit them to three. More than that significantly increases the likelihood that you won’t achieve any of them.

Now is the time to communicate to employees your expectations about time off, performance and serving patients. The end of the year is especially stressful on everyone, so have this conversation well in advance while cooler heads prevail.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Steven Nelson of Eye Candy Optical, Westlake, OH: “As much as we love to be busy, we have to be ready for the ‘back to school’ slump in September to mid-October. This means right-sizing inventory, getting the team to take their vacation time, and getting the ad campaigns ready for ‘the season.’” Jen Heller at Pend Oreille Vision Care in Sandpoint, ID, also uses this time of year to run her annual inventory check, “to clean up all the loose ends and have everything accounted for, but not so close to the end as to stress us out.”

It’s vital to start marketing for late-year events now and get your message out through direct mail, email and on social media. Set your appointments as early as possible as an indicator of patient flow and staffing requirements. Offer end of the year specials on high-end sunwear, specialty lenses and the most profitable frame and lens packages you offer.

Finally, “Don’t forget to update your phone messaging and front desk scripts to promote sales, multiple pairs and additional family member appointments.”

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Michelle Wright at DePoe Eye Center, Stockbridge, GA: “It’s time to start planning our Black Friday. We have to: 1.) Choose a theme; 2.) plan advertisements; 3.) planogram; and 4.) purchase eyewear and decide what eyewear we currently have will be a part of the promotion. Last year was our first year with our Black Friday event. It was a success and set the tone for the end of year sales… We all also had a great time.

TRUDI CHAREST
co-founder, Marketing4ECPs

For most optical retailers and optometry practices, if the tail end of the year could be condensed into four words, they would be “Capture that flex spending!” Charest takes this as a starting point in offering these points to focus on in October, which should also be a key month for working out 2020 strategy, she says.

Launch Q4 “Use It or Lose It” campaign.

Finalize 2020 objectives. For example: Fill new associate schedule with 30 new patients per month, 30 return patients per month; grow optical sales by 20 percent. Bring in 10 new dry eye patients per month.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Dr. Blake Hutto at Family Vision Care, Alma, GA: “The year’s end is mostly about perfecting policy and our business format. We think we’re on to a way of treating patients and conducting business that works well, so now it’s putting it to paper. We’re planning a big push for 2020 (the year of the optometrist).”

Build a 2020 campaign strategy. Example:
1 Q1 2020: Fill schedule — “Accepting
New Patients” campaign.
1 Q2 2020: “50% Off 2nd Pair Sale.”
1 Q3 2020: “Are Your Eyes Irritated?”
campaign.
1 Q4 2020: Fill schedule — “Book Appointment” campaign.

Create a promotions and execution calendar for 2020.

Develop a social media strategy for the quarterly campaigns for 2020.

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60 Days Out…

As we move into November, a re-focus, a few recalls and a team refresh are in order, along with a progress report—and we need to talk about your systems.

PAULINE BLACHFORD
founder, Pauline Blachford Consulting

Now is the time to revisit your year-end targets and goals. Review with your team what targets have been met, which ones are close to complete and which ones need to be adjusted. If a certain target is far out of reach, set a more reasonable expectation for the last two months of the year — one that can still be celebrated if met and counted as a success.

Focus your recall efforts on patients who haven’t visited your practice in 2019.

It can be easy to lean into the holidays and let your targets slide. Don’t underestimate how much your team can accomplish if properly motivated. Start planning ahead for your year-end staff celebration. Include additional bonuses and surprises for staff if your practice meets its targets for the year.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Maureen Garbis Compass Eyecare, Oak Park, IL: “We have a sales goal. If it’s met by Dec. 20 we get the whole holiday week off with pay. We’ve met it for the last four years and are on track for this year also.”

MARK HINTON
CEO and president of eYeFacilitate

Review last year, same time, to understand opportunities and missed opportunities; it’s a trip back in time.

Revisit systems of process and procedure. After all, people don’t run the business, systems run the business, and people manage those systems. Practice Management Systems (PMS) alone is a bunch of reports to sift through; and PMSs are like viewing your business through the rear-view mirror, it already happened. Check out industry data-mining software products like Glimpse or EdgePro by GPN; using these types of systems gives you the ability to examine your business through the “’windshield” and evaluate trends to navigate in an easy and nimble strategy.

What other family members need exams? Get Care Credit dialogs solid.

(And in case you skipped it last month…) Begin planning first quarter 2020; whiteboard ideas, including what, when, who.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Dr. Robert Easton Jr., OD, Oakland Park, FL: “We are doing updates in our office of older equipment to better link to our Compulink EHR. We just updated our autorefractor/keratometer from the ARC 900 to the ARK 1e. We’ll also update our Humphrey VF unit to the latest Humphrey VF technology for our growing Glaucoma practice.”

CHAREST

Time for a flex check — and time to get creative, says Charest:
Analyze Q4 2019 “Use It Or Lose It.”
Hire graphic designer to create Q1 2020 campaign.
Schedule out the rest of the graphics you will need to have created throughout the year.
Plan any additional events you may have in 2020 such as trunk shows.
Add to the marketing calendar.

KARLSRUD
After setting out the plan and establishing the scorecard to determine success factors, it’s go time!
Hold a launch meeting with the team and take the time to explain where you’ve been as a practice, where you are currently, and where you are heading. Don’t forget to focus on “why” you are putting these plans and goals in place. Explain how each member of the team contributes to the success of the practice. Start keeping score. Create excitement around accomplishing goals and roll out your incentive program!

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45 Days Out…

Six weeks till Santa: Time to think about cards and customer appreciation. (Oh, and did we mention flex spending?)

BLACHFORD

Start preparing a customer appreciation plan. Have your staff prepare cards or e-cards that thank your customers and wish them well during the holiday season. This can include some light holiday marketing, such as offering patients discounts on eyewear purchased as gifts. Go the extra mile by planning holiday giveaways that require patients to call or visit your practice to enter. This is a great way to get your patients on the phone, when staff can ensure their contact information is up-to-date, and ask them about booking an appointment in 2019 or early 2020.

HINTON

’Tis the season (almost) for gift certificates to make holiday shopping a snap; who wouldn’t love another set of eyewear, or a gift certificate for contacts — or to give to contact wearers to buy glasses they’d actually be seen wearing, “For the cool yule in you!”
It’s HSA and FSA “Use it, don’t lose it,” time.

Social media bump time.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Deb Jaeger at Eye Center of the Dakotas, Bismarck, ND: “We strive to keep staff fed and happy as we get through the year-end rush to use vision benefits. Always a busy time with holidays and year-end flex-spending, we try to keep our days flowing normally to reduce stress. We encourage gift certificates and send thank you notes each week to vendors, patients, customers, and friends of the practice we are thankful for.”

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30 Days Out…

OK folks—it’s time to execute!

BLACHFORD

Implement your customer appreciate plan early. December is a busy time for postal services. If your practice chooses to send e-cards, emailing patients around Dec. 1 gives them time to benefit from any discounts, coupons or goodies you send their way.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Kim Hilgers, Monson Eyecare Center, Owatonna, MN: “I’ll get postcards designed with our rebate money from our billing group ready in October and Solution Reach email blasts prior to it. Basically, I get inventory built up starting this month into the end of the year and have a promotion on our discontinued/dogs/unloved frames (free frame with the purchase of lenses). Pre-inventory checks so that we are prepared to do final inventory on the 31st of December.”
ECPs looking to end the year strong and drive more traffic to their practice can try drumming up more business in December with attractive and cheery holiday displays. Holiday-themed products, giveaways, activities or a holiday open house are a few ways of attracting patients and potential patients into your clinic. (And remember, offering something with no strings attached is a great way to start building a strong, trusting and loyal relationship with a new customer.)

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Dr. Adam Ramsey at Socialite Vision, Palm Beach Gardens, FL: “I am changing my window displays to attract more customers. Curb appeal matters and I want to draw their eye to my store.”

HINTON

One month out, Hinton urges ECPs to start by revisiting his tips for the two-month and six-weeks marks.

Keep an eye on that white board; are you accomplishing the pre-determined goals? I advise all readers to read “The Checklist Manifesto.” Another tip: Who has time to read all these recommended biz books? Solution: The Blinkist app. This is a book summary app and it’s quite good.

Don’t forget those stocking stuffer ideas.
Play big with sharp focused communication to patients who don’t picture eyecare and eyewear as a perfect gift for the holidays.

Social media, emails and signage for eyewear and contact lens gift certificates.

CHAREST
Execute the last month of “Use It Or Lose It.”

Review ROI on all marketing initiatives for 2019 including website conversion, traffic, paid advertising, email marketing, recall cards/calls, and any other marketing and compare year over year.

Finalize your promotions calendar for 2020 and tasks.
Get everything ready in your Q1 2020 campaign: website updates, paid advertising new campaigns, social marketing, social media, email blast, etc. — and ensure you have a set schedule for the end of December, beginning of January to transition to the new campaign.

KARLSRUD

Hold an update meeting and review the KPIs and the results thus far. People only respect what you inspect, so if you pass on this meeting you will likely pass on hitting your goals. Celebrate areas that are going right and ask what prevents success in areas that are not. Adjust the plan accordingly but do not abandon it.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Annette Prevaux at The Visionary Inc., Allen Park, MI: “This has been a really challenging year so I am hoping to end on a high note. We fired Eyemed so revenue is down until my patients go elsewhere and realize it’s not like us. Also, cleaning up and moving out inventory that is sold online at a discount, bringing in more private/exclusive frames.”

Focus on the importance of accomplishing the goals set and ways to improve processes or best practices.

Review the expectations of your team in terms of time off and navigating the holiday seasons. Communicate clearly and often with your team. Motivate! Motivate! Motivate!

21 Days Out…

Time to check in with your team on the past year, with an eye on 2020.

BLACHFORD

Hindsight is 20/20. Reflect on your 2019 goals, where you thrived and where you didn’t. What worked? What didn’t? What changes do you need to make in the year ahead?

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Dawn Christman at Munoz North Valley Eye Medical Group, Indian Hills, CA: “I will be looking over our current stock and our sales reports for the year. I have a few objectives. First would be to identify frames that are not selling. With these I will either try to exchange out for better styles or identify as a sales item. I will put together frame and lens packages and frame only pricing to increase sales while reducing stock. I will take a look at the frame lines that are not selling well to determine if we are going to go forward with the lines in 2020 or replace them. I want to identify lines I don’t already carry that may fit well in our office. This way I can put together a list to work from when selecting new lines for 2020. As for best-selling lines I will consider if we wish to increase, or leave as is, the number we carry in stock. I will also work on identifying what areas our opticians need or want assistance in to develop educational goals for 2020.”

Don’t do this alone: schedule staff check-ins now through the end of the year. Ask for their perspective on what is working, what isn’t and how your practice can be improved. Your frontline employees will no doubt have insights about the technology they use and what they’ve heard from patients.

Ask your staff about their personal and professional goals in 2020. Consider how your practice’s goals align with those of your employees. This can help you identify mutually beneficially training opportunities, as an example, that will engage an employee who can contribute new skills to your practice.

HINTON

Strategic, matched communication between departments to encourage patients to include the additions prescribed by their doctor. Often what I note when working with practice teams is the doctor will prescribe a specific product for a patient solution and the team member forgets to follow through. At such a busy time of year specifics sometimes get missed; it’s important for the team to stay focused.

14 Days Out…

Stay motivated, finish strong and go into 2020 with your plans in place and armed with as many “lessons learned” as you can.

BLACHFORD

Intel and insights are really only useful if acted upon. With two weeks left in the year, begin your preparation and planning for 2020. What issues were identified by your staff, and what needs to be purchased, discussed or clarified to address those pain points? Develop solutions and set a plan in place for ensuring you build on your strengths and shore up your weaknesses as a business. If you need to hire more staff or provide additional training to your team, do your research and legwork now.

Right before year-end, finalize all of your numbers for the year and analyze them. These will be your baseline figures for 2020 — ones you’ll use to develop your goals, such as reducing your number of unbooked appointments by a certain percentage.
Set your 2020 targets, share them with your team and keep them accessible and visible. Everyone should be on the same page and reminded every day of what they’re working towards (which should include some kind of compensation or reward for meeting a given target).

HINTON

At this point, Hinton urges a review of his tips from 1 month and 6 weeks out.

And right before the year ends… Review your white board, first-quarter goals with “what,” “when” and “who.”

Write and rehearse new dialogs to engage patients into first-quarter goals.

New Year multiple-pair strategies: “Who” and “when.”
To finish strong, try daily huddles with specific focus; all hands on deck; end-of-day outcomes from the huddles.

KARLSRUD

Don’t let up and keep the focus on your KPIs! The year is ending soon and so is the opportunity to earn the incentives put forth on day 90! Motivate right to the end.

BRAIN SQUAD TAKE:

Selena Jachens at Urban Eyecare & Eyewear, West Des Moines, IA: “We are planning a huge 2020 party! We are also bringing in a new line and featuring one of our best brands in our fall trunk show.”


EXPERT BIOS

PAULINE BLACHFORD consults with optometrists across North America on how to reduce un-booked appointments, increase eyewear sales, and improve employee engagement and productivity. She writes regularly for the Canadian Journal of Optometry and is a frequent speaker at industry conferences and events. For more information, visit paulineblachford.com.

MICHAEL KARLSRUD is a 20 year optical industry veteran. He currently runs a coaching consultancy focused on executive development, leadership, management and sales. He is the author of Selling By Design, A Field Guide to Selling, and hosted “On The Road Sales Coach” and “The Customer Service Download” supported by The Vision Council. In addition to coaching and speaking internationally, he is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of Wisconsin, River Falls Business School. For more information, visit karlsrudcompany.com.

TRUDI CHAREST is the co-founder of 4ECPs, a business resource company for eyecare professionals. 4ECPs has six divisions: Training, Marketing, Social Media, Payment, Jobsites and Events. A licensed optician with over 25 years of extensive eyecare experience, she is well known for designing, developing and facilitating training and marketing programs for ECPs across North America. For more information, visit marketing4ecps.com.

MARK HINTON is a practice owner, as well as CEO and president of eYeFacilitate, a private practice consultancy. A sought-after ABO/COPE approved practice management expert, with eYeFacilitate he helps practices drive optical efficiencies, maximize managed care revenue and profit, improve capture, and increase revenue through simple systems with a focused process. Contact him at mark@eyefacilitate.com.

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Very Important Patron

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Now let’s be clear… All customers are important. And all customers should be treated as such… but when we asked our readers about their most important customer, we didn’t mean it generally, we wanted specifics. Eyecare is an intimate undertaking and as such sometimes there are people who just become extra special. Second families, friends, lovers … sometimes “Can I help you?” can be the start of a beautiful relationship. And if none of these stories resonates with you, just remember the words of Kyle Kravick of Davis Duehr Dean in Portage, WI: “Most important? The next one through the door.” Because, hey, you never know!

I reconnected with an old schoolmate that later became my husband … for about three years anyway! – Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL

My most important patients have been members of C ongress and state senators. It gave me a chance to provide comprehensive eyecare and demonstrate how valuable optometry is to Americans. It also created a relationship in Washington and Tallahassee that helps the profession. – Robert M. Easton, Jr., OD, FAAO, Oakland Park, FL

In 1970, a patient told me about a commercial building that was going up for sale. I now own that building and it houses my practice. Best $12,000 I ever spent. – Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA

I have a family — a grandmother, mother, and three daughters — that have become like family. I’ve done all their glasses and took time getting to know them. Over the years we’ve become closer and closer. There’s nothing like having a second family when your own is far away! Frances Ann Layton, – Eye Associates of South Georgia, Valdosta, GA

About a year after I opened my optical shop, I went through some heartbreaking life changes. Several of my customers rallied and promoted my business, invited me to join the local Rotary Club, and supported my shop. All those things took my life in a better direction; I will be forever grateful! – Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY

We did sports vision training for years, and still do occasionally, so there are a handful of athletes we keep in contact with. About half have made the big leagues and the other half are great people who have become some of our biggest advocates.” – Josh Bladh, Dr. Bladh OD, Diamond Bar, CA

Had a patient who lost both eyes during WWII. He lived every day to its fullest with a sense of gratitude and humor that always lifts my spirits, reminding me of the amazing gifts in my life. Thinking of him always makes my day! – Dennis Iadarola, OD, Center For Vision Care, Monroe, CT

Actually, we’re a customer of theirs! My lab rep from Luzerne, Bernie Kastan. I met Bernie on one of my first days over six years ago. The relationship has developed into a friendship. We play golf and we don’t live across the street from each other. There are golf outings that focus on business, but this one will be filled with great conversation. – Rick Rickgauer, Vision Associates, Girard, PA

My most important customer was my husband! I had not seen him for years — we went to high school together — and he came in as I was finishing for the day. He asked for an exam because he was wearing old contacts (they were the dirtiest lenses I have ever seen). I stayed and did the exam. He asked me out and we just celebrated our 25th anniversary! – Kimberly Riggs, OD, Ligonier, PA

I have a nycz patient who has become my go to office handyman. My staff calls him for everything from changing light bulbs to patching cement. (His name is actually Nycz!) – Marc Ullman, OD Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NJ

My most important patient ever was actually a whole family of five children that did vision therapy. I quickly became attached to them as if they were my own. I eventually got invited over to their house and it turned into a great friendship! – Jade Kowalick, Ryczek Eye, St Petersburg, FL

I’ve developed many friendships with customers through the years simply from taking an interest in them and filling their needs. I know the staff thinks they are actually personal friends, but that’s just how I treat them when they come in. – Pam Housley, Texas State Optical of Nederland, Port Arthur, TX

My most important customer became my wife. We met years before we ever dated in the practice, one day it clicked. We’ve been together for 13 years. – Kevin Count, Prentice Lab, Glenview, IL

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