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Lynn Valley Optometry

Success comes naturally to purpose-driven practice.

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Lynn Valley Optometry, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

OWNERS: Dr. Altaz Shajani; URL:lynnvalleyoptometry.com; FOUNDED: 1992; OPENED CURRENT LOCATION: 2007; DESIGN:Interior design by Susan Taubensee; floor plan by Barbara Wright Design; EMPLOYEES: 17; AREA: 3,500 square feet; TOP BRANDS: Anne & Valentin, Claire Goldsmith, Ørgreen, SALT, Face à Face, Lindberg, Gold & Wood; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/lynnvalleyoptometry


BRITISH COLUMBIA IS KNOWN for its natural beauty and people who are committed to green lifestyles, and that’s definitely the vibe at Lynn Valley Optometry in North Vancouver. Yoga studios and a natural-foods store are steps away — and a 617-acre nature preserve is close, too. Everything evokes the spirit of healthy, holistic living, from many frames made of natural materials to the basket of cloth hand towels in the washroom.

But Dr. Altaz Shajani and his team aren’t simply catering to people heeding the call of the wild. The optometrist has developed a thriving practice that offers a full spectrum of medical eyecare and a wardrobe approach to eyewear. By adding new technology and services to organically grow his business, as well as a second doctor and robust staffing, Shajani now has $2 million in annual sales.

A Vancouver-area native, Shajani knew he wanted to return home after graduating from the New England College of Optometry. He bought Lynn Valley Optometry in 2001, starting with two employees and an office in a medical complex. By 2007, the practice needed more space and had the chance to move to a new mixed-use development: Lynn Valley Village, a two-level open-air retail and services plaza anchored by the Lynn Valley Library.

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It was a bold move that worked out well: The business grew by 30 percent between 2007 and 2009. The recession meant a few years of stagnation, but between 2011 and 2014, the practice grew another 60 percent — success that Shajani attributes in part to “wisdom-sharing groups” that give like-minded ODs the chance to talk about their work and think about ways to grow.

For example, having lunch with a colleague inspired him to open a dry-eye center. “Usually, if a person says they have dry eyes, they’re handed a bottle of artificial tears. There’s so much more we can do,” says Shajani, from offering a soothing hot towel during office procedures to the latest technology. Shajani has also developed specialties in children’s vision therapy — he works with about 40 kids each year — as well as Ortho-K and nutraceuticals.

He’s also invested in diagnostic equipment and solutions that help him serve difficult cases. (One patient with amblyopia told him he hadn’t seen so well with his lazy eye in 40 years.) And while Lynn Valley Optometry used to carry lots of mass-produced frames, it has phased them out in favor of more independent lines. “It was risky since we went from being a middle-of-the road optical to a higher-end one,” he says. “It took us a few years to find a balance.”

Shajani’s business philosophy is rooted in the book Noble Purpose: How to Drive Revenue and Do Work that Makes You Proud by Lisa Earle McLeod. “A few years ago, I spent the day with my leadership team to come up with our noble purpose, which is to improve lives,” he says. “It seems simple, but it’s such an important part of our culture. Now, anytime we’re deciding whether to recommend a certain product or service to a client — even though it might be a more difficult conversation due to cost or time — we’re more inclined to recommend what is best for them.”

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The practice is also introducing concepts from The Great Game of Business, based on Jack Stack’s best-selling book. “Every business could benefit from this type of management in which everyone has a voice in how the company is run and a stake in the financial outcome,” says Shajani. Lynn Valley Optometry now stages mini-games with monthly goals for each department and rewards like manicures and movie tickets. “When there’s a game and we’re keeping score, it’s always more fun and people try harder,” he says.

Vancouver is home to eyewear e-commerce giants Coastal.com and ClearlyContacts, but Shajani doesn’t see them as threats, since bargain hunters are not Lynn Valley Optometry’s demographic. The practice is building its own e-commerce presence and plans to have its entire inventory of about 1,000 frames online later this spring, both for buying and browsing. A more mobile-friendly website is in the works, too.

Still, Lynn Valley Optometry strives to be a place that people will want to visit in person, even if they start their eyewear shopping online. From fresh flowers to the tasty snacks both in the reception area and the exam room, from music and comfy leather seating to the essential oils used throughout the practice, everything is pleasing to the senses. “We’re creating an eye experience people will remember and talk about with their friends,” Shajani says.

PHOTO GALLERY (7 IMAGES)

Five Cool Things About Lynn Valley Optometry

1. LIKE MAGIC: Lynn Valley Optometry is kid-friendly. A dedicated playroom has an Xbox for older kids and toys for younger kids. Dr. Shajani greets youngsters with a simple magic trick to settle them down for their exam, and every child receives a free pair of sunglasses with full UV protection.

2. MAIN EVENT: The practice holds an annual customer appreciation day in June, offering $100 off each pair of complete single-vision pairs and $150 off progressives. The single-day event brought in $50,000 last year. Lynn Valley Optometry also draws foot traffic from plaza events including a summer concert series.

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3. SOCIAL CAPITAL: The practice has more than 1,200 Facebook likes and a string of “Favourite Optical Store” awards from the local North Shore News. Customers take a one-question iPad survey as they leave, asking whether — on a scale of 1 to 10 — they’d recommend the practice to a friend. The survey yields a Net Promoter Score that’s routinely in the mid-80s. Online reviews are strong, too.

4. LOVE YOUR TEAM: Shajani believes in motivating his staff in lots of ways — even something as small as jotting a note of encouragement on the back of their paychecks. For a special surprise one day last holiday season, “we closed at 3 p.m. and went to the mall,” Shajani says. “I gave everyone $150 and said they had to spend it on themselves.”

5. TELL THE STORIES: New looks in the dispensary include more frames displayed on shelving instead of frame boards. Customers can use iPads to explore the stories of top frame lines (at left), and a department store-style sunglass shop-in-shop is coming this year, too.

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Inspiration can come in funny ways. Remember the Seinfeld episode (“The Opposite”) where George flips his routine by ordering chicken salad on rye instead of tuna on toast — and he suddenly gets the girl and a job with the New York Yankees? Dr. Shajani says this classic show helps him remember to be different and take risks.

Julie Fanselow was the original editor-in-chief of INVISION magazine and now contributes to the publication.

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America's Finest

Want 15 Years of Growth While Keeping Your Team Close and Building the Optical of Your Dreams? This Tennessee Practice Can Show You How

They knew if they treated patients right, the business would succeed.

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Spring Hill Eyecare, Spring Hill, TN

OWNER: Rob Szeliga, OD; URL:springhilleyecare.com; FOUNDED: 2005; YEAR OPENED FEATURED LOCATION: 2018; ARCHITECT AND DESIGN FIRMS: Rob Stensland, Optometric Architects (architect); Amy LeAnn Szeliga (interior designer); EMPLOYEES: 13 full-time, 4 part-time; AREA: 8,300 sq. ft.; TOP BRANDS: Dailies Total 1/Multifocals, Kate Spade, Costa, Shamir, neurolens; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/springhilleyecare; INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/springhilleyecare; BUILDOUT COST: $1.6 million


ROB SZELIGA MOVED to Spring Hill, TN, about 30 miles south of Nashville, with his family as a teenager in 1993. They were in the vanguard of an influx that has seen the population grow from 1,200 to over 40,000. He graduated from Southern College of Optometry (SCO) in 2005 and opened Spring Hill Eyecare “ice cold.” He and his wife Amy had a clear idea of what they wanted the business to be: a practice that offers the total package and only refers when surgery is needed. “I spent 100 percent of my time and energy growing my practice — not filling in elsewhere,” he recalls. “Luckily, I had strong support — a wife teaching elementary school and my mom and two sisters as my first employees. We knew that if we treated patients right, the practice would grow.” They started with 1,200 square feet, their newborn son Jackson literally growing up in the office. “My second lane didn’t have a phoropter, it had a crib,” says Szeliga. By their 10th anniversary they already had one major expansion under their belt and needed another.

Spring Hill Eyecare owner Rob Szeliga OD with his wife Amy and family.

The Szeliga’s found their dream location in a vacant 1870 farmhouse, but the structure would require demolition if it was going to work. “Without the proper approach, this would not be well received in a community growing as fast as Spring Hill, and quickly losing its small-town charm,” recalls Szeliga. They posted a letter on their blog explaining their plans, and this honest approach elicited overwhelmingly positive feedback online.
In the months before the house and barns were demolished, Szeliga would leave work, change clothes and get busy reclaiming their great features, including 11 fireplace mantles, original barnwood/beadboard, old doors (now frame boards), giant parlor doors, live edge maple breakroom tables milled from original trees, wavy glass muntin windows, and a cast-iron tub flower bed. The new building’s layout centered around preserving a giant, centuries-old oak tree.

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The juxtaposition of the salvaged fixtures and curios with the practice’s modern equipment lends a unique vibe to the exam rooms, each of which has a theme, including “garage” (the practice’s logo painted on a 1940s truck door) and “music” (with 100-year-old instruments) to name just two. Spring Hill Eyecare’s dry eye treatment center is called The Greenhouse after the one on the original property. “You go in the room with dry eyes facing old rusty tools,” says Szeliga. “When you get up from the massaging chair your view is of lush plants and flowers; you leave refreshed.”

Catering to the town’s expanding demographic, the team sees everyone from InfantSEE babies to geriatric patients. Among its numerous specialty facilities is a 900-sq-ft. sports vision/vision therapy center.
Szeliga used to spend about $400 a month on newspaper ads, but he says that all changed when, for a one-time fee of that same amount, he hired a patient to install a marquee sign under the practice’s street sign. “When the sign is not describing an upcoming event, we try to keep it full of puns or statements about pop culture, particularly eye-related ones.” He says simply keeping this sign funny and relevant generates enough community feedback and new patients that he doesn’t bother much with traditional marketing anymore.

Word of mouth is Spring Hill Eyecare’s other main form of advertising, much of it generated by creatively cultivating ties with the community through charitable and other events.  Examples include Kids’ Day and a Pre-Parade Hot Chocolate Party every year before the Christmas parade. “We even begged to get the parade path extended to go by our new location to keep this tradition,” Szeliga says. Spring Hill Eyecare sponsors many schools, teams and causes, but they also enjoy creating their own charitable events, like their “Give A Gobbler” Thanksgiving turkey campaign. The team “gobbles” loudly for donations. “For larger donations even our doctors gobble!”

One of the foundation cornerstones of the 1870s farmhouse that once stood on the site is displayed in the optical.

Szeliga says that while there are ECPs with flashier sites, he’s proud of the genuine feel he’s achieved with Spring Hill Eyecare’s online presence. “Too many websites have just generic stock photos … Our most popular posts are those involving personal photos or stories about myself, my family and my team.”

He credits the trust he has established with his prized team for much of Spring Hill Eyecare’s success. And it’s a quality he repays handsomely. A believer in continuing education, he has taken his team to the state optometry meeting for the last 10 years and to IDOC’s Orlando meeting the last five. But it’s not all work and study. “For our 2018 Christmas party I rented a Hummer limo for a Christmas lights tour and created a jigsaw puzzle to reveal clues about their Christmas gift: a four-night cruise to the Bahamas to celebrate an excellent 2018,” he says.

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Crucially, through all the rapid growth, the practice has never lost the close-knit feel of the early days. “While I no longer have family working at my office,” says Szeliga, “we’ve been able to keep the family atmosphere for 13 years.”

PHOTO GALLERY (26 IMAGES)

 

Five Cool Things About Spring Hill Eyecare

1. TV STARS. Szeliga’s repurposing of the old farmhouse that once stood on the site of the practice was featured in DIY Network’s Nashville Flipped series.

2. GOOGLE TOUR. Its website features a Google virtual tour: the photographers liked the building so much they shot extra rooms in exchange for being able to feature them on their website.

3. NEVER LEAVING. The coffee bar has two TVs, charging stations, customized coloring books for grownups, mini-fridge and a Keurig coffeemaker.

4. ACCOLADES GALORE. Office manager Melanie Jenkins was named Tennessee Paraoptometric of the year in 2018, SECO Paraoptometric of the year in 2019 and AOA Paraoptometric of the year in 2019.

5. WALKING ADS. At a community event this year staff had low-cost suns made with their logo and a sticker: “Redeem for $25 off a pair of sunglasses.” Only a few people did, but “others [wore] them around town,” says Szeliga. Next year’s target: high school marching bands.

WHAT THE JUDGES SAID

  • Outstanding community engagement throughout the planning and construction of their new location. Honoring the legacy of the former structure by incorporating materials and elements is a testament to their respect and concern for the community they serve. Nathan Troxell, PPG, Monroeville, PA
  • Spring Hill Eyecare has built an optical business that’s people- and purpose-focused, and they’ve fostered a growing business by organically growing their practice, while remaining true to providing quality eyecare in a welcoming environment. Stirling Barrett, KREWE, New Orleans, LA
  • The space is bonkers! Overall one of our faves! Leigh and Todd Rogers Berberian, Todd Rogers Eyewear, Andover, MA
  • The focus on local, independent optometry is evident across all aspects of the business. The website shines. It is easy to maneuver, has all the info one would be looking for and the imagery is great. I felt like I knew the practice and the doctor after visiting. The themed exam rooms are also a great idea as they create a relaxed, eclectic environment for their high-tech functions. Beverly Suliteanu, Westgroupe, Ville St-Laurent, Québec, Canada

 

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Beneath a window in Spring Hill Eyecare’s optical, customers will find a hefty, timeworn, earth-stained rock that, while adding natural charm, clearly bears the marks of human shaping. It was one of the foundation cornerstones of the 1870 farmhouse that once stood on the site. The stone was hand-cut in the 1860s. Says Szeliga, “Opening my practice cold was a lot like the process of forming this hand-cut stone. It took patience — and patients! Like the old house, we started with a strong foundation that was built on two pearls I learned early: ‘What’s good for the patient is good for the practice,’ and ‘See everything we do from the patient’s point of view.’ Trends and tech are constantly changing…but we continually grow based on our strong foundation.”

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America's Finest

A Simple Formula Keeps This Vancouver Optical Growing After 40 Years

They created a safe space for self-expression.

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The Optical Boutique, Vancouver, British Columbia

OWNER: Sue Randhawa; URL:theopticalboutique.com ; FOUNDED: 1979; EMPLOYEES: 2 full-time, 1 part-time ; AREA: 1,000 sq. ft.; TOP BRANDS: Anne et Valentin, Theo, Jacques Marie Mage, Face á Face, LPLR ; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/theopticalboutique; INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/theopticalboutique


Randhawa enjoys the juxtaposition of antique or vintage aesthetics and The Optical Boutique’s fashion-forward frames.

THE OPTICAL BOUTIQUE was founded in 1979 and quickly became a key destination for eyewear connoisseurs in Vancouver. Sue Randhawa worked alongside the original owners for 15 years before purchasing the business in 2007. Having already built a rapport with the clientele, she opted for a minor update rather than a wholesale reinvention. But that would soon be forced upon her when the building management unexpectedly invoked a clause in the lease that allowed them to tear the site down for a complete rebuild. “What began as an unfortunate circumstance evolved into an awesome opportunity. I was involved in the entire design process [of the new store]. It was amazing to be able to see my vision for the space become a reality.”

The Optical Boutique is unmistakably the expression of a personality, rather than the sleek product of a design consultancy. Frames reside in antique draws, set off by vintage signage; they’re draped over old books with cracked spines and perched atop ancient typewriters. Randhawa’s touch is evident in large features like the store’s brick accent wall, its display cabinets, and the antiques she collects during frame-buying trips. She particularly enjoys the juxtaposition of antique or vintage aesthetics and The Optical Boutique’s fashion-forward frames.

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Randhawa tries to travel at least twice a year to European shows for buying and chooses selections with her diverse clientele in mind. “I choose collections that are handmade, unique, colorful, and whenever possible logo-free.”

The store is located in Kerrisdale, a “tight-knit” community, in Randhawa’s words, on Vancouver’s West Side that skews to the older and wealthier, though The Optical Boutique has established a city-wide reputation and is drawing a growing number of people from other demographics and neighborhoods thanks to its well-tended online presence. “Our average client is around 60-70 years old and is anything but typical. One of the things we hear often in the store is how diverse our collection is,” she says. “We often have clients in the neighborhood who come in with their friends to get a minor adjustment and end up staying to visit and browse.”

The team at The Optical Boutique strives for a nurturing environment. “We encourage positive self-talk, as the majority of people, when confronted with a mirror, become their own biggest critic. This type of service does not go unnoticed as we receive numerous recommendations based on the experience we provide.” So numerous, in fact, that Randhawa doesn’t really bother with traditional marketing. “We have spent 40 years sticking to our simple business model — to sell quality products at a reasonable price and focus on providing the best customer service possible,” she says. “It speaks volumes to us that we get most of our new clients from them seeing and loving our eyewear on existing clients and being referred in to us.”

Having said that, she does have a strong presence on social media. “I really do try to follow a posting schedule, but I find that my organic posts, the ones that I share because I like something about the image, seem to resonate more.” The store’s Facebook and Instagram accounts reflect Randhawa’s deep engagement with the local fashion scene. “The images I post illustrate the way we work; each person is different and has their own fashion journey. I like to show other women they can have fun with their eyewear.”

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Randhawa credits her staff of “unique and complementary individuals. Each has their own perspective, style, taste, and personality. I love that we all bring different strengths to the table. Some days it feels like we spend more time laughing than working.”

It says a lot about Randhawa’s achievement at The Optical Boutique that to her, entering the store “feels like coming home. I have had clients tell me it feels more like visiting a friend than an optical store. This is a place where clients become friends and people feel safe to express themselves.”

PHOTO GALLERY (13 IMAGES)

Five Cool Things About The Optical Boutique

1. MATCH MAKER. Randhawa has relationships with all of Vancouver’s major lens manufacturers “so we have the diversity to find the right lens on an individual basis.”

2. FASHION FIXTURE. The team are regulars at Vancouver Fashion Week. “I love seeing the designers’ concepts come to life. It’s so much fun to be a part of their journey and to collaborate with them.”

3. INFLUENCER. @theopticalboutique was voted one of the “Top 25 Vancouver Fashion Instagram accounts to follow” by a local online newspaper.

4. DOOR-TO-DOOR. Randhawa makes house calls. Sometimes with a small collection of frames to do a complete fit in the home, other times just to say hi. “It’s a lovely interlude in my day.”

5. GIVING BACK. Every year the business provides a scholarship to an emerging designer or student who shows at Fashion Week.

WHAT THE JUDGES SAID

  • Sue’s love of fashion and eyewear is evident; but what strikes me even more is her desire to help patients discover their personal style: “Each person is different and has their own fashion journey.” Nathan Troxell, PPG, Monroeville, PA
  • Sue’s passion and enthusiasm for quality, individuality and culture clearly translate into a unique story with a strong dose of personality — all with a distinct point of view. Stirling Barrett, KREWE, New Orleans, LA
  • There are some awesomely creative things about this shop — and the social media looks as slick and cool as the website. Leigh and Todd Rogers Berberian, Todd Rogers Eyewear, Andover, MA
  • The best marketing tool The Optical Boutique has is Sue. Her active involvement in the local fashion scene and her unique and eclectic style provide amazing PR that cannot be bought. Beverly Suliteanu, Westgroupe, Ville St-Laurent, Québec, Canada

 

Fine Story

Randhawa and her team have worked hard to disabuse their clientele of the idea that they have to match their eyewear to their clothes. “For so long people have been worried that their new glasses won’t ‘go’ with what they’ve got in their wardrobe, but this has to stop,” she says. “We try to educate each client that our goal is for the eyewear to be harmonious with their own coloring, and that means they won’t have to worry about matching it. In fact, sometimes having a contrasting color can be quite striking.” Randhawa tries to show through her own eyewear that glasses can be an excellent way to make a statement, add some color to a complexion, or even elevate an outfit. “I think what we’ve created at The Optical Boutique is a safe space for people to try to test their own boundaries and explore their inner creativity in a way they might not have even considered before,” she says.

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America's Finest

You’ll Be Amazed What This Minnesota Practice Did with 1,000 Sq. Ft.

Hint: A stunning optical, exam lane AND plans to put in an edger.

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Wink Family Eye Care of SLP, St. Louis Park, MN

OWNER: Dr. Roman Gerber; URL:winkfamilyeyecare.com ; FOUNDED: 2018 ; ARCHITECT FIRM: Bob Shaffer Foundation Architects; EMPLOYEES: 2 full-time ; AREA: 1,000 sq. ft.; TOP BRANDS: Ørgreen, Etnia Barcelona, MODO, Acuvue Oasys 1 Day, Fresh Day Sphere; FACEBOOK: facebook.com/winkslp; INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/wink_of_slp; YELP:yelp.com/biz/wink-family-eye-care-of-slp-saint-louis-park; BUILDOUT COST: $150K


Dr. Roman Gerber had wanted to open his own practice from the moment he graduated OD school in 2011. His dream came true in January 2018.

DR. ROMAN GERBER WANTED to cold-open a practice from the moment he graduated optometry school in 2011. Life circumstances and other opportunities kept that from happening for a few years, but by early 2017 he was scoping out potential locations for his own business in the South Minneapolis/St. Louis Park, MN area.

Things moved pretty quickly and the doors to Wink Family Eye Care of SLP opened on Jan. 15, 2018. Gerber began by seeing patients at Wink three half-days a week, while still working at his previous office; but before the year was out, Wink had gone from one to two full-time employees and was busy enough for Gerber to start working there full-time himself.

Gerber’s prime motivation for choosing the St. Louis Park neighborhood was because that was where his family first settled after immigrating from Russia when he was just 4 years old.

But as he took a closer look at the area, he was surprised at how much busier certain blocks were than others not that far away. The location he eventually settled on benefits from being in a mixed commercial and residential zone with Fresh Thyme and Trader Joe’s groceries nearby, a CVS pharmacy across the street and a busy Starbucks outlet just two doors down.

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Gerber estimates that about half of his patients are in the 20-39 age group, and they’re an important segment for Wink. “However, that still leaves half of our patient base as younger than 20, or 40 and older. We try to cater to everyone.” Figuring out the ways to cater to each group has been a learning experience, he says. “We understand that many of our Millennial/Gen Z patients may prefer to communicate through secure email/text so we try to accommodate that. Although some of our Gen X/Baby Boomer patients would prefer phone calls, it has been surprising to me how many of our patients from those generations also prefer text messages.”

The store’s décor and distinctive green color scheme were inherited from Wink’s partner business, Wink Family Eye Care in Chanhassen, MN, with a few embellishments. The store’s cool feel, sleek materials and careful, efficient use of space offer a lesson in how to make the most of a smaller space. Explains Gerber: “With our young hip demographic, we focused on a classier optical. The walls are lined with stinkwood and showcase our frame lines beautifully. We have a small, 1,000 square foot, flag-shaped space. We wanted to fit a pretest room, exam room, office, and future edger without sacrificing our optical. Our architect worked tirelessly to fit all of these components and to allow a natural flow.”

Eyewear is merchandised by brand, with Tracey Eggerstedt, Wink’s technician/paraoptometric/optician extraordinaire organizing and reorganizing constantly. Once again, it’s a constant learning curve: “It’s interesting to see where people look at glasses and which locations are ‘hot spots,’” Gerber says. He adds that the store’s online focus is primarily on building brand awareness. “We like to educate our patients while still showcasing our fun vibe.”

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Gerber strongly believes in listening to staff, treating them with respect, and empowering them. “Take care of your staff and they will take care of your patients,” he counsels. Before every eye exam, staff call on the patient’s medical and vision insurance to ensure there are no surprise bills. Eggerstedt focuses on pre-testing, frame styling, and learning everything about ocular health. “She enjoys being quirky with our patients and getting to know each one,” Gerber says. But all of the staff do a little bit of everything. “Kristin [Cannon] is our contact lens guru. She loves working with scleral lenses and doing difficult insertion and removal trainings.” The key to achieving great service, Gerber says, is to “treat every patient as if they were your family. We really try to empower patients and give them information to make the decisions for themselves. Everybody’s life is different and all we can do is educate our patients on all their options.”

PHOTO GALLERY (20 IMAGES)

Five Cool Things About Wink Family Eye Care of SLP

1. PARTNERS IN FINE. Wink Family Eye Care of SLP has a partner practice, Wink Family Eye Care in Chanhassen, MN, another America’s Finest Honorable Mention. They share staff, records and a website, but are run as separate businesses.

2. MEET & GREET. The Wink team are huge believers in networking and spend about five hours a week meeting other small businesses in the community, looking for ways to help each other out.

3. WILL TRAVEL. Gerber has made charity trips to Honduras, India, Mexico and Peru, and for two years helped build clinics in The Gambia, West Africa.

4. AWARD WINNING. Staff member Tracey Eggerstedt was named Paraoptometric of the Year in 2018 by the Minnesota Optometric Association.

5. EASY ON THE EYE. The store’s green color theme was chosen on the basis that the green wavelength of 555nm is the easiest for the rods in the retina to see.

WHAT THE JUDGES SAID

  • Great logo, clean marketing materials and excellent use of that eye-popping green. Very clean and “shoppable” store layout. Nathan Troxell, PPG, Monroeville, PA
  • Refreshing in its simplicity and direct messaging. A solidly cool business. Leigh and Todd Rogers Berberian, Todd Rogers Eyewear, Andover, MA
  • While they obviously take the medical side of their business very seriously, there is a quirky, fun side that is evident in their marketing materials and social media posts. I like the community involvement, both local and global. Beverly Suliteanu, Westgroupe, Ville St-Laurent, Québec, Canada

 

Fine Story

Wink Family Eye Care of SLP owner Dr. Roman Gerber’s approach to choosing the precise location for the practice was downright scientific. In early 2017, while looking for places in South Minneapolis and St. Louis Park, MN, he says, “We ran a geospatial analysis (a gathering, of imagery, GPS, satellite photography and historical data for specific geographic coordinates, i.e. a street address or postal code) on a few spaces that were available. We were aware the area was changing rapidly, but it was great to see whether our assumptions about traffic patterns were correct. For the most part they were.”

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