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Nip Staff Negativity in the Bud With These Positive Solutions

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Nothing kills staff morale more quickly than unaddressed problems. Interpersonal quarrels, performance issues and hostilities between departments will have a negative impact on employee motivation and enthusiasm. Thinking that the problem will go away on its own is as counterproductive as putting spoiled milk back into the refrigerator. Negativity is contagious, and the only way to keep it from spreading is to deal with it immediately. Additionally, ignoring a problem quickly leads to lost respect for the leader, resulting in ineffective leadership.

The best way to control negativity is to keep it from rearing its ugly head in the first place. Below are a few tips that will preserve positivity in the workplace.

  • Be fair.
  • Be consistent.
  • Meet with each staff member on a regular basis.
  • Act quickly to nip negativity at the bud.
  • Recognize accomplishments.
  • Provide strategic framework, i.e. team vision and mission.

Let’s take a look at a three examples of situations that can quickly become toxic to staff morale:

  • The biller told the optician that she is tired of fixing his mistakes and that he needs to do a better job getting the right information in the computer. The optician is very offended as he believes that he rarely makes a mistake and the biller is making too much of an issue of it when he does. 
  • One technician is convinced that she does the majority of pretesting because the other technician spends too much time chatting with the patient.
  • The front desk staff feels that the technicians should help more with answering the phone. The technicians complain that the front desk staff takes too long to get the chart ready, which creates bottlenecks in the back office patient flow.

Now, let’s discuss solutions:

  • Schedule a sit-down meeting with the optician, biller and yourself, stating the purpose of the meeting is to determine what each person can do to assist the other in making their job easier. During the meeting, allow the two individuals to come to an agreement with as little involvement from you as possible. 
  • Get the facts first. If the chatty technician is creating extra workload, have a discussion with her. Compliment her on wanting to be friendly with the patients, but explain that lengthy conversations keep patients waiting longer than they should. Show her that you value her ability to be friendly and sociable by asking her greet patients at the door during the next trunk show or other event.
  • Give each group a chance to view the other job from a different perspective. Make time for each front desk member to spend the day following a technician and let each technician spend a day at the front desk.

REBECCA JOHNSON is a motivational ophthalmic staff trainer, a nationally recognized speaker and author, and director of training for Eyefinity. Her honors include the AOA Paraoptometric Special Service Award and VisionMonday’s “Most Influential Women.” Contact her at rebecca.johnson@eyefinity.com

This article originally appeared in the November 2016 edition of INVISION.

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How to Handle Negative Reviews

There are effective ways to reduce their impact.

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ARE YOU HAUNTED by old reviews, especially bad ones?

Many clients ask whether and how they can be deleted. In some cases, ODs have taken over an office and want to dissociate from the reviews of the old owners. Given the importance of reviews, many of our clients would do anything to wipe the slate clean. Well, unfortunately that is usually not an option (except for a special circumstance that I will discuss below), but there are effective ways to handle undesirable reviews and reduce the impact they have on your reputation.

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A Case When You Can Delete Reviews

If you are taking over a business, you can delete old reviews and start fresh with proof of acquisition, but according to a response from a Google rep to one of our clients, this is not advised because it could negatively affect your SEO. This, of course, is relative. While having no reviews is detrimental both to your new patient acquisition and to your SEO, having a number of bad reviews from an old practice that is no longer relevant might do even more damage. You have to weigh out the situation based on the type of reviews and the importance and quality of your SEO. Keep in mind that 9.8 percent of your visibility in local search engines is based on review signals such as the number and average rating of your reviews, so a lot of great reviews can seriously help your website ranking.

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The Alternative to Deleting Reviews

Perhaps the best advice when you have unwanted reviews is to drown them out with positive ones. If you have some bad comments, it’s not the end of the world. Everyone has an opinion, and dissatisfied customers are more likely to post a review than those that are happy with your services. (Studies show that while 35 percent of people review after a bad experience, only 23 percent review after a good one.)

So your job is to make a conscious effort to encourage and even outright ask your happy patients to do so.

How Many Reviews Do I Need?

The answer to this question largely depends on your local competition and where you are starting from. If your biggest competitor has 20 reviews, you want to shoot for 30. If they have 50, go for more, but it has to be reasonable. Growing your reviews is an ongoing process that you should always be working at, and it won’t happen overnight. If you are new to this, have a goal of 20 reviews and aim for a couple every month. The point is that getting reviews is something you need to work at. Many happy customers just need a reminder (or two) to share their experience.

How Do I Get Reviews?

There are a lot of strategies for getting reviews, and we’ve written about this a bunch, but what’s most important is that your whole practice needs to rally around the goal. Getting reviews is a team effort. You see a happy patient in the exam chair, ask for a review. The optician fits a happy customer, ask for a review. The office manager is scheduling a follow up visit, ask for a review. Making patients happy and asking for reviews must become part of the workflow, with everyone on board.

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Respond to Bad Reviews

The last important point that needs mentioning is that if you do get a bad review, don’t ignore it. While you don’t want to get personal, go into details or make excuses, you do want to express that you care about customer satisfaction and view this as a chance to improve. While keeping HIPAA in mind, it can help to offer to speak to the disgruntled party to rectify the situation. Other readers will see a professional response that shows good customer service as a positive sign and you never know, the unhappy client may change his or her mind — and review.

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Use Digital Marketing to Target Glasses and Contacts Wearers in Your Area

A member of Facebook’s Small Business Council shares 4 key ways.

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IN SOME WAYS, IT’S a great time to be an optometrist. In 2017 alone, the average income for an OD increased by about 4 percent. That said, no independent eyecare professionals should turn a blind eye to the technological advances that make it easier than ever to reach customers.

While optometry offices are far from obsolete, online upstarts like Warby Parker and Felix Gray have gained traction. Optometrists are working to combat this shift. One survey found that 57 percent of ECPs have offered more frequent discounts to appeal to customers.

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Thankfully, you don’t have to cut your way to profitability; instead, use digital marketing to target people in your area who already have glasses or contacts.

See Eye to Eye With Clients. The advent of social media targeting has leveled the playing field in countless industries. Optometry is no exception. ODs can use digital tools to target customers with precision.

While the medium is important, the people you’re targeting are even more critical. Whether you’re filtering by city, county or zip code, try to stay as local as possible. Once you’ve identified your target audience, it’s time to take your marketing efforts to the next level.

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Set up your facebook pixel. About 171.4 million Americans use Facebook at least once per month. Many of those people use it to hunt for medical information for themselves or their kids. This is where the Facebook pixel — code you place on your website that uses cookies to track how users interact with your Facebook ads — proves its power. Use a pixel to retarget individuals further down your sales funnel, gathering information that makes it possible to contact people who are interested in your services.

Limit your distinct audiences. Set a dollar amount (it could be $100 or $1,000 per month) for your sponsored social posts, and then stick to that rate regardless of how many distinct audiences you target. At most, you should target three audiences; targeting too many people is as bad as targeting no one.

Amplify your reach. For more chances to convert, you need more eyes on your posts. Promoted Tweets or Facebook Ads can help you reach a larger audience, but you don’t necessarily need to pay for followers. This can be as simple as a call to action at the end of your posts asking readers to share on their profiles.

Make your creative pop. Twitter’s Video Website Card is changing the way brands advertise on the social platform. Pairing autoplay video with a company’s website link, it allows advertisers to create ads that pop. Ads using the tool received twice as many click-throughs as traditional mobile video ads.
Optometry, like most medical fields, isn’t leading the charge of digital marketing. But that doesn’t mean your office should fall behind. Social media marketing isn’t easy, but these suggestions can help you get started.

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Celebrity Clients Are Cool, but Never Forget Who the Real Stars Are

Repeat after me: “Every customer who walks through my door is a VIP”.

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I’VE BEEN AN ECP on the Upper West Side in NYC for the better part of the last 30 years. Over the years, my Manhattan store, The Eye Man, has seen a virtual who’s- who of television, stage and screen walk through the doors.

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In the early ’90s, I remember a particular client, an attractive woman in her 50s, who asked if she could bring her husband in for a pair of glasses. She intimated that he was a bit of a celebrity, but didn’t disclose his name. To accommodate her, I told her we could keep the shop open late one evening so that he could shop undisturbed. So, one brisk, fall evening after the shop had officially closed, I waited for our after-hours appointment and opened the door to one of America’s beloved anchors, Dan Rather.

I greeted him as I would greet any customer, with a warm smile, a handshake and quickly locked the door behind him. Then I set about my business. He was here, after all, because he needed a pair of frames and no amount of swooning over his fame or accomplishments was going to get that job done. I felt he appreciated that professionalism and although there were a dozen things running through my head to ask about some of his most recent news features, I concentrated on helping him find what he was looking for with regard to my field of expertise … eyewear.

Dan and his wife spent approximately an hour with me that night, and what struck me most was how interested he was in everyone else. He asked specific questions, and he really listened. He didn’t posture, he didn’t demand extra attention, he was humble, and gracious and in an extraordinary way, he was very “normal.” I think he appreciated that I treated him like I would any customer in the store. I was attentive, but not overbearing. I was interested, but not stupefied by his celebrity. I offered my opinion when asked and I helped him get what he came for. In return, he gave me something … a reminder of the power of asking thought-provoking questions and truly listening, and how important that is in making people feel understood and valued.

There have been many more stars over the years, and for a few minutes or an hour, each lit up my store like a Broadway marquee while they shopped. I think the main thing these chance encounters have taught me is: The real superstars in our stores are “regular” people, the everyday men and women that share our names and the experiences they have within our stores with their families and friends. These people are the silent sales people that go unnoticed, yet many have given out your card or referred you to a friend and have added to your business. So, remember to make every customer that walks through your door, calls your business, or interacts with you on social media feel like a VIP. They’ll leave feeling like a superstar and will help lead you to your own type of blockbuster success.

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