With small, handheld diagnostic instruments ODs can carry out complete refractive exams anywhere, for a company’s staff on-site, at schools, nursing homes or on mission trips.

Portable equipment has become very accurate, more affordable and highly durable. Data is often transferable to a PC, tablet or phone. For example, EyeNetra’s smartphone-powered refraction offers online mobile practice software to manage an OD’s events, scheduling, intake information, visit notes, e-prescriptions and payments. The instruments often have rechargeable batteries and work for hours on a single charge. They can also be used in-store to move easily between exam rooms.


EyeNetra

Auto-refractor, auto-lensometer and portable phoropter all connected to a Mobile Practice Manager. These three devices come in a case that weighs less than 7lb. 

(617) 684-5680 | eyenetra.com 


ICare

ICare ic100 tonometer for clinics and iCare HOME tonometer for patients.

(888) 422-7313 | icare-usa.com


DGH Technology

Pachmate 2 pachymeter, Scanmate Flex for any desired combination of A-scan, B-scan and UBM.

(800) 722-3883 | dghtechnology.com


Smart Vision Labs

SVOne autorefractor

(212) 796-6124 | smartvisionlabs.com


Marco

Marco HandyRef-K, a hand-held auto refractometer/keratometer.

(800) 874-5274 | marco.com


PlenOptika

QuickSee Wavefront Refractor

(617) 862-2203| plenoptika.com


Smart Ways to Use Portable Diagnostic Devices  

Dr. Adam RamsayICONIC EYE CARE, PALM BEACH GARDENS, FL

I find that small, portable equipment is less intimidating for patients and gives them a better patient experience. I use Marco’s HandyRef autorefractor for kids and anyone in a wheelchair. Instead of moving the patient around, I bring the equipment into the exam room when their eyes are dilated and this is less cumbersome and more efficient. It’s also very accurate if you use it correctly. I also use Icare’s tonometer instead of an NCT to test eye pressure because it is less intimidating for patients, especially those having their first eye exam. When I do eye exams outside of my optical, for example, at schools and nursing homes, I use EyeNetra’s portable phoropter because it’s so convenient. I also use Pachmate 2, a handheld pachymeter from DGH Technology, to measure corneal fitness for patients with glaucoma or an eye infection. On the whole, I love using hand-held instruments on my patients.

 

Dr. Dickson Chen DAVICH OPTICAL, LOS ANGELES, CA

As I do nursing home visitations a couple of times a week, it’s important that I have diagnostic instruments that are not only portable but accurate. Having previously used the Marco Palm ARK hand-held autorefractor, my favorite autorefractor now is the SVOne by Smart Vision Labs. Its accuracy is unsurpassed because it is based on a Shack- Hartmann wavefront aberrometer. It is also fast in that it captures readings in 3 seconds per eye, which greatly enhances patient comfort and stability of readings. For tonometry, I use Icare’s ic100 tonometer, which both my techs and patients absolutely love. No more scary air puffs, and it’s accurate to boot!

 

 


This article originally appeared in the April 2018 edition of INVISION.   

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