Connect with us

Rebecca Johnson

Rebecca Johnson: Dancing Into 2016

mm

Published

on

Management advice from Rebecca Johnson

Don’t sit out your chances. Give life a spin this new year.

This article originally appeared in the January 2016 edition of INVISION.


I could hear the sounds of a jazz band coming from the overhead speakers as I walked into the breakfast room at my hotel. Good jazz always brings a smile to my face, but I was not ready for what I saw. An elderly gentleman was dancing in front of the oatmeal table and playing “air saxophone.”

I looked around the room for signs of his wife or grandchildren, eager to see their reactions, but there was no one else in sight. I tried to leave the room to save him the embarrassment of suddenly realizing that he had an audience, but before I could turn around, the man looked over his shoulder and knew he had been caught. The performance came to an abrupt stop and he quickly began spooning oatmeal into a bowl, while wearing a look that said, “Geez, I hope she didn’t see that. How embarrassing.”

Advertisement

Looking back, I wish that I had clapped for him and begun my own dance. Instead, I felt embarrassed, too. I pretended that I hadn’t noticed his impromptu act of joy, and I stood quietly in line behind him.

How sad. I bet that, as a child, he would have continued his playing like no one was watching. And as a child, I would have joined in. That’s why I’ve decided that my plan for 2016 is to dance! OK, maybe not literally, but I plan to enjoy every moment with the eyes of a child who sees the magic in everything. And I ask you to join me.

Your reasons for being worried, stressed or upset will never go away. You will always have that one patient out of a hundred who totally unnerves you. But instead of letting that person sideline you, turn your thoughts to the other 99 patients with whom you can make a difference.

Think back on the people that you have encountered in your life who will never know the difference they made to you, whether big or small. The fact is, you are “that person” for many people. The “dance” may be as simple as offering a warm hug or just being a friendly face to someone who is having a bad time in life. And as eyecare providers, we get this opportunity every day.

Lee Ann Womack once had a big hit with these lyrics penned by written by Mark Sanders and Tia Sillers: “And when you get the choice to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance.” It’s a new year. I’ll see you out there on the dance floor of life!


REBECCA JOHNSON is a 30-year veteran in the eyecare business. She is the executive director of Business Consultative Services for GPN and owner of EyeTrain4You, an ophthalmic staff training and development company. Contact her at rebecca@gatewaypn.com.

Advertisement

Rebecca Johnson

Here’s Proof That Knowledge Does Not Equal Understanding

mm

Published

on

There is a Youtube video called “The Backwards Brain Bicycle” (invmag.us/01173) that demonstrates what happens when you mechanically change one thing on a bicycle — on this bike when you turn the handlebars left, the wheel turns right and vice versa. It sounds like a simple change. Knowing that the wheel turns the opposite way means all you need to do is turn the wheel the opposite direction from the way that you want to go, right? Wrong! As you will see, once your brain is wired one way, it is very hard to change it. Knowledge does not equal understanding.

What can a business owner or manager learn from this? Just because you tell your staff to do something differently (knowledge) does not mean that they will easily make the change (understanding). For example, you decide to go “all in” with sunwear sales. You order product and create a Sun Center. You hold a staff meeting to discuss the role of each person in supporting sunwear sales. The receptionist will ask every patient to bring in all of their eyewear, including sunglasses. The technician will discuss the importance of protecting against UV rays during pretesting. The contact lens tech will put sunglasses on every patient and walk them to a window to demonstrate the need for them with contact lenses. The optician will show the patient a polarized lenses demo and pick at least two sunglass options for them to try. At the end of this meeting, you assume, after sharing this knowledge with your team, they’ll immediately adapt and you’ll see a great return on your investment. The next month, you see a slight increase in sales, only to return  to square one in month two. Does this sound familiar?

Think about the bicycle experiment. It took eight months of daily practice to rewire an engineer’s brain. Even once he’d adapted to it, any disturbance, like a cell phone ringing, threw his brain off track again. Knowing this phenomenon, a smart business owner would create a complete, long-term strategy around the change that includes multiple sessions of role-playing, discussion and rewards. He’d bring in outside training, like frame reps, on a regular basis as a confidence builder for staff. He’d also be sure to place total focus on the change before moving onto something else. For instance, implementing new software at the same time he’s trying to build sunwear sales would be counterproductive.

I also found it interesting how quickly his son learned to ride the backward bicycle. I believe this shows that the longer someone has been doing something one way, the more difficult it is for the brain to rewire to an alternative method. This is particularly important for ECPs to remember when presenting change to a long-term employee.


Rebecca Johnson is a motivational ophthalmic staff trainer, a nationally recognized speaker and author, and director of training for Eyefinity. Her honors include the AOA Paraoptometric Special Service Award and VisionMonday’s “Most Influential Women.” Contact her at rebecca.johnson@eyefinity.com

Continue Reading

Columns

Nip Staff Negativity in the Bud With These Positive Solutions

mm

Published

on

Nothing kills staff morale more quickly than unaddressed problems. Interpersonal quarrels, performance issues and hostilities between departments will have a negative impact on employee motivation and enthusiasm. Thinking that the problem will go away on its own is as counterproductive as putting spoiled milk back into the refrigerator. Negativity is contagious, and the only way to keep it from spreading is to deal with it immediately. Additionally, ignoring a problem quickly leads to lost respect for the leader, resulting in ineffective leadership.

The best way to control negativity is to keep it from rearing its ugly head in the first place. Below are a few tips that will preserve positivity in the workplace.

  • Be fair.
  • Be consistent.
  • Meet with each staff member on a regular basis.
  • Act quickly to nip negativity at the bud.
  • Recognize accomplishments.
  • Provide strategic framework, i.e. team vision and mission.

Let’s take a look at a three examples of situations that can quickly become toxic to staff morale:

  • The biller told the optician that she is tired of fixing his mistakes and that he needs to do a better job getting the right information in the computer. The optician is very offended as he believes that he rarely makes a mistake and the biller is making too much of an issue of it when he does. 
  • One technician is convinced that she does the majority of pretesting because the other technician spends too much time chatting with the patient.
  • The front desk staff feels that the technicians should help more with answering the phone. The technicians complain that the front desk staff takes too long to get the chart ready, which creates bottlenecks in the back office patient flow.

Now, let’s discuss solutions:

  • Schedule a sit-down meeting with the optician, biller and yourself, stating the purpose of the meeting is to determine what each person can do to assist the other in making their job easier. During the meeting, allow the two individuals to come to an agreement with as little involvement from you as possible. 
  • Get the facts first. If the chatty technician is creating extra workload, have a discussion with her. Compliment her on wanting to be friendly with the patients, but explain that lengthy conversations keep patients waiting longer than they should. Show her that you value her ability to be friendly and sociable by asking her greet patients at the door during the next trunk show or other event.
  • Give each group a chance to view the other job from a different perspective. Make time for each front desk member to spend the day following a technician and let each technician spend a day at the front desk.

REBECCA JOHNSON is a motivational ophthalmic staff trainer, a nationally recognized speaker and author, and director of training for Eyefinity. Her honors include the AOA Paraoptometric Special Service Award and VisionMonday’s “Most Influential Women.” Contact her at rebecca.johnson@eyefinity.com

This article originally appeared in the November 2016 edition of INVISION.

Continue Reading

Rebecca Johnson

Is Your Practice Moving Forward … Or Stuck in the Status Quo?

mm

Published

on

I love the story about the little boy who fell out of bed in the the night. Hearing his screams, the mother ran in and asked, “What happened?” Through tears the little guy replied, “I guess I stayed too close to where I got in.”

I liken the little’s boy’s answer to something that many optometrists tend to do: stay too close to where they got in. In other words, status quo and business as usual becomes a safe spot to hang out in. Yes, change is difficult; however, change must happen for a practice to keep from becoming irrelevant.

Let’s try a quiz to determine if you are staying too close to where you got in.

1. When was the last time you remodeled all or a part of your practice?
  • a. Within the last year (3 points)
  • b. Between two and four years (2 points)
  • c. Over four years (1 point)
  • d. I love my mauve and blue décor and silk flowers from the ’90s! (0 points)
2. How often do you move your frame collections?
  • a. Monthly (3 points)
  • b. Quarterly (2 points)
  • c. Yearly (1 point)
  • d. How would I find anything if I moved my frame collections? (0 points)
3. How often do you post on social media?
  • a. Regularly on Facebook and Instagram (3 points)
  • b. Regularly on Facebook (2 points)
  • c. Monthly on Facebook (1 point)
  • d. My patients don’t use social media. (0 points)
4. What’s up with your dispensary technology?
  • a. We use digital measuring technology with every patient and promote it as a wow factor. (3 points)
  • b. We use digital measuring technology with every patient, but do not discuss it as a wow factor. (2 points)
  • c. We have access to digital measuring technology, but the opticians complain that it takes too long to use, so it is not used much. (1 point)
  • d. We take measurements by hand and a Sharpie. (0 points)
5. How often do you hold staff meetings?
  • a. Weekly, plus stand up meetings every morning (3 points)
  • b. Weekly (2 points)
  • c. Monthly (1 point)
  • d. We don’t have time for staff meetings. (0 points)
How’d you do?

15 points: You have got it going on and your bank account shows it!

10-14 points: You are average, and who wants to be average?

5-9 points: You are opening a wide door for your competition.

0-4 points: You might as well get back into bed.

So how’d you do? If you scored less than 14 points, then review the quiz. It is full of simple ideas to refresh your practice. Here’s a hint: If it has a value of three points, you should probably be doing it. Staying in the status quo may feel safe and easy, but you are at risk of your competition pulling the sheets out from under you.


REBECCA JOHNSON is a motivational ophthalmic staff trainer, a nationally recognized speaker and author, and Director of Training for Eyefinity. Her honors include the AOA Paraoptometric Special Service Award and VisionMonday’s “Most Influential Women.” Contact her at rebecca.johnson@eyefinity.com.

This article originally appeared in the October 2016 edition of INVISION.

 

Continue Reading

Advertisement

Advertisement

Subscribe


BULLETINS

Get the most important news and business ideas for eyecare professionals every weekday from INVISION.

Advertisement

Most Popular