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Tip Sheet

Reward Your Community and They Will Reward You … Plus More Tips for February

You ask for their support; give them yours.

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MARKETING

Hiding in Plain Sight

Are you in an office park? Throw a sale for your neighbors. Jeanne Bogdal of CNY Eye Care in Syracuse, NY, says a Michael Kors sale brought in tons of people from the 100-plus offices in her complex.

PATIENT CARE

Don’t Box Yourself In!

Some practitioners gain a sense of comfort booking patients far in advance, but that doesn’t always work to everyone’s advantage. Cindy Dunn, a consultant with the MGMA Health Care Consulting Group, tells the story of a large office that had its schedule filled six weeks out. But doctors would often ask patients to return in three or four weeks, resulting in extra work for the receptionists. The fix was easy. “All they had to do was change the process by leaving spaces open for returning patients,” Dunn told an advice column for ECPs on American Express Open.

MARKETING

Search, You’ll Find

More people are buying brand frames, ordering online and exploring alternative supply channels. You can resist these changes or embrace them. The first place to do that is your website. Adjust your SEO terms so anyone in your area needing “adjustments,” “repairs,” “emergency services” and even upgrades for their “Ray-Bans” or “Maui Jims” find a warm welcome, and maybe a new ECP, with you. 

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MARKETING

All in This Together

Roadrunner Eyecare in Albuquerque, NM, is active in the community, sponsoring youth groups, sports teams and more. And at the mention of any of those partnerships, patients get a discount. If customers bring in a receipt from a partner, they can choose a discount on their exam or glasses. “We ask for support from our community; it is also our responsibility to support the community,” says general manager Erik Lawrence.

PSYCHOLOGY

Keeping it Cool

A conversation or negotiation getting out control? Refocus on agreement, says Joseph Grenny at Harvard Business Review. “When people feel threatened, they tend to focus … on areas of disagreement. It’s remarkable to see parties who agree on 90 percent of an issue obsess over and even magnify the 10 percent they disagree about. … Change the tone …[by] saying something like, ‘Can I pause for a moment and point out what we both agree on?’ Then deliberately, slowly and sincerely you can enumerate common interests, beliefs or histories.”

MANAGEMENT

Keep it Simple

Have you ever ended a long email with “Thoughts?” Bad idea, says email app maker Sanebox (see their email guide at invmag.us/021801). Be specific. Say “Do you think we should do X, Y or Z?” to save time .

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SALES

Hit the Road

Trunk shows offer portability. Frameology Optical in East Syracuse, NY, tried a show at a client’s hair studio. “It was a huge success,” says owner Stacy Daniel-Murphy. “We had an afternoon of fashion, make-up and hair tips to go with the frames. Having the show offsite, I was able to get my name out.”

Since launching in 2014, INVISION has won 21 international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact INVISION's editors at editor@invisionmag.com.

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Tip Sheet

Stop Expecting So Much and More Tips for February

But always bring donuts if you’re running late.

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staffMore Donuts

Want to add some fun to your store? Take a tip from Sherrie’s Jewelry Box in Tigard, OR, where “you’re never late to work if you bring donuts,” owner Sherrie Devaney told INVISION’s sister publication INSTORE magazine.

TRADE SHOWSGood Expo Days

Headed to Vision Expo East? Follow the advice of marketing consultant Andrea Hill and take along a collapsible instant hot water carafe “because coffee is the beginning of a good day” and those Starbuck’s lines can get brutal.

hiringValue Added

Anand Sanwal, the CEO and co-founder of fast-growing tech company CB Insights, has an interesting take on the best question to ask a job candidate — “Tell me how you prepared for this interview.” Not only does the reply likely reveal a lot about how the person’s commitment to the position — do they care? — but it hints at their work ethic and analytical capabilities, he says. In the case of good candidates who have done their homework, they may even have fresh ideas about the way the company functions. “All of a sudden it goes from an interview to a conversation and that is a really encouraging sign if someone is adding value at that stage,” he told The Twenty Minute VC podcast.

psychologyKeep It Real

The problem with high expectations is they often result in future disappointment. Meanwhile, low ones tend to make you glum since there’s not much to look forward to. The answer? Stop expecting, says Jason Fried, who has written several books on work. “I used to set up expectations in my head all day long. But constantly measuring reality against an imagined reality is taxing and tiring.” Expectations also keep you mentally living in the future and deflated when events don’t measure up — even if what happens is pretty good. So, in 2019, don’t expect so much.

planningUse Will-Do Lists

When making your daily to-do list, don’t pick 20 things you hope to do that you think add up to one day’s work: you’ll overestimate your capacities. Instead, pick the three or four most important things, and really commit to doing them, even if you think they’ll take you only a couple of hours, suggests Luciano Passuello at litemind.com.

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merchandisingProtect Your View

Yes, the job market is tight and you may be short staffed, but hang those Help Wanted flyers on a local bulletin board or near your counter, not as some retailers do, in your front window. “Your front window is your customers’ first impression of your store,” says merchandising expert Tom Crossman. “Don’t make it a messy one.”

TIME OFFShort and Sweet

There seems to be a belief that a “proper” vacation requires at least a week. But as psychologist Thomas Gilovich told the Boston Globe, “If you have to sacrifice how long your vacation is versus how intense it is, you want shorter and more intense.” That’s because we remember and judge our experiences not in their entirety but according to how they felt at their emotional peak, and at the end. Yes, time feels scarce in the modern world. But you have no excuse for not having a memorable holiday this year. Start planning now!

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Finding the Best Tax Professional for You and More Questions for February

Getting a head start on what could be a volatile year, and more advice for February.

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2019 seems like it’s going to be a volatile year. What should we do to get ready?

Eight years of economic growth and cheap credit allowed many business owners to gaze far into the future and craft successful, long-term strategies, but it does seem those times are coming to an end as trade wars, rising interest rates, political turmoil, spooked financial markets and ongoing technological change cast a shadow over what otherwise is still a strong economy. In such a shifting, unstable environment where visibility is low, Donald Sull, a London Business School professor, recommends “active waiting.” Contemplate alternative techniques, explore likely scenarios and focus on general readiness. This is a time of threat but also opportunity. “Keep your vision fuzzy and your priorities clear,” Sull says. “Maintain a war chest and battle-ready troops. Know when to wait — and when to strike. When you grab an opportunity or move to crush a threat, amass all your resources behind the effort.” At the same time, continue making routine operational improvements such as cutting costs, strengthening distribution, and improving products and services. “Though mundane, these initiatives foster efficiency, which can position you to snatch a golden opportunity from rivals’ jaws,” Sull says. It all sounds rather dramatic, but then high drama surely awaits.

Podcast: More Ways to Motivate Your Own Eyecare Business Team
INVISION Podcast

Podcast: More Ways to Motivate Your Own Eyecare Business Team

Podcast: Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?
INVISION Podcast

Podcast: Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?

Podcast: Try Not to Blink Talks About the Business of Cannabis, and Its Role in Modern Healthcare
Try Not to Blink

Podcast: Try Not to Blink Talks About the Business of Cannabis, and Its Role in Modern Healthcare

The sales experts you quote often recommend role-playing exercises. But my sales staff always slinks away when I suggest them. How can I get them to play along?

That may be because the focus is negative, says sales trainer Dave Richardson. Make the role-playing positive and fun. First, play the role of the salesperson and let your salespeople critique you. Then, when it’s your turn to play the customer, instead of saying, “Here’s what you did wrong,” start off by telling the person what you felt they did well and what you would change if you had the opportunity. Always finish on a positive, encouraging note, Richardson says.

Our marketing team’s images were recently lifted and used by the vendor for their advertising without crediting us. When I contacted them, they said, “We’re sorry; it was the intern’s fault.” How should I handle this?

If it was “the intern’s fault,” who approved the final vendor layouts? But regardless of whose fault it is, you should get some compensation for the use of your images, says business management consultant Kate Peterson. The vendor would have paid for the images had they used any other marketing professional to create them, so they should have no issue with paying your in-house team. “I would suggest that the retailer assign a fair price (what she typically pays her team per image) and send an invoice directly to the head of the company with pics of their ads and an explanation. If applicable, tell them you will apply the amount of the invoice against an outstanding balance,” says Peterson. “The key here is to remain positive and confident, as opposed to challenging. Assume they are expecting to compensate, and communicate in a tone that expresses confidence in their interest in doing the right thing.”

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My business is only four years old and up until now I’ve done my own taxes but now I’d like to find a tax pro. Where do I find a good one?

Online directories such as CPAdirectory.com, Accountant-Finder.com and AccountantsWorld.com are a good place to start. Most will allow you to search by name, location and industry focus. The National Association of Tax Professionals also offers an online database of tax preparers, and the American Institute of CPAs has one for CPA firms. If you do contemplate hiring a tax preparer you found online, request referrals to past clients so you can ask about the quality of the service they received. A possibly better strategy is to ask people in the industry. This is because your ideal target should have some experience doing returns for vision-related businesses as every industry has its own rules and deduction options.

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Tip Sheet

Keep Your Mouth Shut and More Tips for January

Why don’t you hold your opinions first and ask theirs?

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DESIGNThe Big Picture

Thinking of adding a mural to your building? See if the government will pick up part of the bill. Joe Declet of Fins and Skins in Pinellas Park, FL, told Invision’s sister mag PETS+ that he got tired of telling customers to look for the “ugly orange building,” so when his lease needed renewing, he negotiated adding the mural. Working with a local artist, he now has a 30- by 50-foot mural depicting a coral reef — and the city chipped in with a $1,500 grant as part of a beautification program. Hello Instagram Influencers!

MEETINGSHold Your Piece

According to Simon Sinek, a typical meeting follows a pattern: A manager outlines a problem, says what he thinks, then asks for opinions. But it’s too late then, he says. Managers who withhold opinions benefit in two ways: “One, it gives everyone…the feeling they have been heard. And two, you get the benefit of hearing what everybody thinks,” says the author of bestseller Start With Why.

SALESGuaranteed Gain

If you offer private label frames you should offer your own warranty as well. J. Galt Eyewear in Lexington, KY, does that with its basic frame and lens package, which guarantees a unique look and more at a fixed price of $175. “We include poly-carbonate lenses with scratch coat and anti-reflective coatings along with a one-year scratch and breakage warranty,” says co-owner Dawn Stratton, OD.
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SALESPromise They’ll Look Better

There’s a big untapped market out there: women who wear contacts because they think they look better without frames. It’s a segment Mary Nyitray, owner of Optical Arts in Toledo, OH, targets with relish. “I’ve had so many women who wear contact lenses because they hate the look of themselves in glasses,” she says. “But contacts won’t make you look better. When I work my magic, I can camouflage the wrinkles or dark circles, give your face color, and make you look healthier and younger,” she says.

PlanningGetting Better Every Day

If you’re still searching for a guiding principle for 2019, consider this from Gretchen Rubin, author of the bestselling The Happiness Project: “What you do every day matters more than what you do once in a while.” That applies not only to your life’s work daily basis but also the things you spend your money on. Do you really need that huge SUV if you only drive to work and back?

MARKETINGBetter Off Blue

Ever have a subject that you’ve talked about until you’re “blue in the face?” And figured it was time to give up because it didn’t seem to be having an effect? Well, don’t stop just yet. Bob Nelson, author of 365 Ways to Manage Better, says that it’s often just when you’re getting tired of saying a message over and over that it truly starts to take hold. Repeat the message until you start hearing it back from your employees. Then you’ll know it has sunk in.

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