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Use the Strongest Human Motivators to Increase Sales

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“Well, here’s your chance to try the opposite … If every instinct you have is wrong, then the opposite would have to be right.”— Jerry Seinfeld to George Costanza


Last month, I said that the biggest obstacle facing salespeople is they try to move their average patients in a positive direction. Because selling is based on the Law of Motion, moving average patients in a positive direction proves to be futile. The harder you try to push them in that direction, the more they resist. (For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.) The educate-and-persuade process is irritating and awkward for patients and it’s frustrating as hell for you! Well, isn’t it?

Right now, most of us are trying to move that average patient in the positive direction by making two very big assumptions: 1) We assume, because we’ve told them of their needs, they actually heard us and understood those needs and 2) We then assume they want to hear all about the products that will save the day, so … we tell them. This is how most of us have been trained to “sell,” yet it doesn’t seem to work to anyone’s advantage. The remedy? Do the opposite.

The opposite of telling is asking. But there is a secret to asking questions: Only ask specific questions (for which your patients have answers) and make sure those questions cause movement. To create questions that cause movement, we have to discover what motivates.

Two of the strongest human motivators are “seeking pleasure” and “avoiding pain.” Of the two, which do you think would be a stronger motivator?

If I told you I would treat you and your entire family to the finest gourmet meal at the best restaurant in town, order the best wines and have the chef make his world-renowned dessert just for you, that would be pleasurable, right? But then I tell you the only catch is the maitre d’ has to smash one of your fingers with a ball-peen hammer before you sit down to this fine meal. “How would you like your steak cooked this evening?” (Whack!) or “Did you spot a McDonald’s down the street?”

As much as we enjoy pleasure in our lives, avoiding pain is the overwhelming human motivator. So we need to develop questions that uncover pain. This is the first step in systematically bringing patients in that negative direction on the pendulum. We need to develop these “pain questions” based on the following template: How do you use your eyes in a particular situation?

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If we start to ask questions that cause movement in a negative direction, questions that uncover someone’s pain, do you think your patients/customers would ultimately want to avoid that?

What’s going to happen is this: Your patients start to become aware of their own pain. Once that happens, they are going to hang on every word you say to help them make that pain go away.

For example, you may want to ask emerging presbyopes, “Do you ever find yourself taking your glasses on and off when you’re trying to read something?”

Here’s your homework assignment: For every product you sell, develop and write down specific pain questions. How? Look at each benefit of each product and develop the pain questions on that basis. Try to paint a real-life picture with these questions. For instance, “When you’re taking your kids to practice in the afternoon, do you find yourself squinting a lot, or shielding your eyes while driving directly into the sun? Does that feel safe?”

In my next article, I’ll show you how to combine pain questions with four simple follow-up questions that will bring your patients all the way to the negative side of the pendulum … to the point where they enthusiastically swing positive with your expertise. How enthusiastically? Would you like to hear your patient ask, “Well, don’t I need progressive lenses in my polarized sunglasses, too?”


Robert Bell believes in “uncommon sense,” inside-out thinking and challenging the status quo of traditional selling methods. He created the EyeCoach Selling System specifically for ECPs. He is also co-director for Project Homeless Connect-Vision Volunteers in San Francisco. Email him at rbell@eyecoach.org.

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This article originally appeared in the May 2015 edition of INVISION.

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Editor's Note

Sometimes Bad Things Happen

It’s how you deal with them that really matters.

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EVERY ISSUE, WHEN I write this Editor’s Note it feels like I’m writing to the future you. I write it several weeks before it appears, but it needs to sound like I wrote it yesterday. And a lot can happen in a few weeks. In this case, we’ll be in a new year and a whole new decade when you read it.

Personally, the end of 2019 was difficult for me. Regardless of the specifics, I am sure I am not alone. Normally, we greet a New Year with a renewed sense of optimism, but a lot of ECPs are worried about changes in the industry. 2020 naturally has us looking to the future of optometry, so we reached out to industry experts to share what they believe to be the biggest trends we can expect this year and beyond. (Big Story, page 34). Spoiler alert: Many will be scary to independent ECPs.

Don’t worry; there are fun things to look forward to. In this issue, we’re introducing some new mini-columns — like ECPs Tell Jokes, Tough Jobs and What I Know for Sure, where ECPs share the things they know to be true. We’re also debuting three new regular contributors. First up is Autianna Wilson, you may know her as The Optical Goddess (@goddessofoptix), and her new column — DiscoverEyes by The Optical Goddess (page 28) — where she will be introducing INVISION readers to truly independent eyewear brands each month. 4ECP’s Cameron Martel (page 52) will be alternating a column with Kaia Carter on marketing and human resource topics. Lastly, eYeFacilitate’s Mark Hinton will be sharing sales wisdom in his monthly column (page 51).

When bad things happen, I like to focus on the positive … the lesson the bad thing is meant to teach me to turn it into a positive. I hope that’s how you approach the predictions our experts are sharing.

Best wishes for your business,

 

Five Smart Tips From This Issue

1. Do your docs straighten up the frame boards? They probably should occasionally. We tell you why. (Manager’s To-Do, page 18)
2. Can you wait just 10 minutes? That’s all experts say you need to increase willpower and break bad habits. (Tip Sheet, page 46)
3. New sales columnist, who dis? Say hi to Mark Hinton and his ideas on dispensary sales. (Columns, page 51)
4. Lift your business out of mediocrity by setting some standards. (Ask INVISION, page 55)
5. Wondering if you should accept Friend Requests from patients? Readers weigh in. (Do You or Don’t You?, page 60)

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3 Major Marketing Trends for 2020

They aren’t the only game in town, but they are currently among the most overlooked from small businesses.

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AS WE ENTER 2020, many businesses are looking at their budgets. Marketing is always an important consideration but it can be difficult to determine where to focus.

One constant: marketing is ever-changing. Knowing that most of us have finite marketing dollars, let’s break down a few trends that are likely to perform well in 2020:

Local Influencer Marketing

If 2018 and 2019 were the pinnacle of national and international influencer marketing, 2020 will be the year of the local influencer. Local influencers — high-visibility people and organizations that reside near your location — are extremely effective if their local reach is strong.

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These influencers often do not have the six or seven-figure follower counts that their national/international colleagues do, but that is a strength in the context of local marketing. A local Instagram influencer with 25,000 followers likely has higher engagement, and when it comes to getting people in your back yard to take notice, engagement is key. And those smaller local influencers almost certainly cost less than their national counterparts.

How to Get the Most Out of Influencer Marketing
  • Have a well-defined measurement of success (link clicks to a website, sales of an item, etc.)
  • Implement as much tracking as possible (tracking URLs, call tracking #s, etc.)
  • Engagement is more than just “likes;” look for shares and commenting activity.
  • Offer an incentive if the influencer hits certain performance thresholds.

Digital PR

Public relations, in its traditional sense, involves trying to get your brand mentioned on the radio, TV, newspaper, etc. The same is true for digital PR, but replace those more traditional media outlets with their digital equivalents. This ties in with search engine optimization and is likely to get more intertwined with SEO over time.

PR is a time-involved and challenging process. However, when it works, it works extremely well. This is not only due to the brand exposure that your business receives, but the SEO benefits.

How to Get the Most Out of PR
  • Focus on stories that have broad appeal, such as how parents can address eye teaming problems in infants versus something generic and overplayed (“Did you know kids need an eye exam?”)
  • Don’t pitch your services or your business; being mentioned is enough to accomplish the SEO/branding benefits you’re looking for.
  • Build relationships with local bloggers and journalists, as they may come to you in the future asking for your opinion.

Engagement in Local Social Media Communities

Younger audiences are rejecting traditional media and favoring social communities. Millennials, born 1980-2000, are the driving force behind this trend.

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Websites such as Reddit and Facebook allow people to create their own hyper-focused communities, and the broader trend is creating communities that are hyper-localized. Reddit, traditionally a content curation/aggregation site, has a community for just about every major city and state, and I’m sure we’re all familiar with the popularity of FB groups.

Look for ways to engage these communities. Often, the administrators will allow you to advertise if you follow certain rules or pay for the privilege. The hoops you jump through are worthwhile.

How to Get the Most Out of Social Engagement
  • Reddit hates when businesses hock their services/wares. Instead of selling yourself, look for ways to add value to the conversation — people will come to you on their own.
  • Avoid generic messages (“It’s back to school time!”) and focus on information that is more regionally relevant (“Dry eye is pervasive in Las Vegas, here’s why…”)
  • When linking back to your website, link to a helpful blog post versus your homepage or service pages. People hate being sold but love to go shopping — let them find your sales channels on their own.

The above trends aren’t the only game in town, but they are currently among the most overlooked from small businesses. Actioning them now with smart strategies will give you a leg up over your peers.

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Remember This Uplifting Fact About the Eyecare Business Next Time You’re Dealing with a Tough Customer

Sometimes the biggest impacts we make are the ones we don’t notice.

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IT’S A POWERFUL thing. I am an optician and a writer. As a writer most people think that my goal is to make a fortune by having a best-seller and getting some studio to pick it up and turn it into a movie. While I will be the first to tell you that is a thing we all dream about, my motivation is different.

I want to make an impact. I want my words to carry meaning over the years to come. I want what I have to say to make a difference in people’s lives. Hopefully in a positive way. I would wager that most of us have similar motivations. What does that have to do with opticianry, you ask? As it turns out, quite a lot.

It was a busy day in my office. There were at least four people waiting for me to help them. We’ve all been there. A patient that I help on a regular basis popped in for an adjustment and made idle chitchat with the other patients waiting for me. The patients were patient that day.

It was a nice change of pace.

As I finished up the sale I was working on, I heard the man say something that caught me off guard. “I’ll bet Will has no idea how many lives he’s touched in here.” I looked up, trying to hide my shock at the comment. He was 100 percent correct. It’s something that I had never thought about.

Everyday, we help people see. Some of us have been at this for decades… how many people have you impacted? How many have they impacted? The thought hit me hard.

Every interaction makes an impression. We tend to focus on the “customer satisfaction” end of things to a fault. Once they are out of our offices we forget what we did for them. Frankly, for the most part we don’t care as long as they don’t come back complaining. But the thing is, we are literally a part of their every waking moment. They wear our work on their faces, and in a small way their contributions to the world are ours too.

That pilot you fit for glasses flies people all over the world because you helped him see. That engineer that just designed the newer, better, longer-lasting lightbulb did so because you helped her see. That local business owner can sign payroll because you fit them flawlessly in their first progressive lens. We as a community make the world as we know it work.

As far as my writing is concerned, you are reading it right now. Who knows, maybe my words will carry some meaning to you. Maybe you’re struggling to remember why you get up every morning and drag yourself in to the office to get yelled at by angry impatient people. Maybe, just maybe, you needed to read this to get your head back in the game. Comically, that’s exactly why I needed to write it; to remind myself why I do what I do.

No matter how small you think the difference you make in this world is, it could be everything to someone else. Sometimes the biggest impacts we make are the ones we don’t notice. Once in a while, like at the start of a new year, it’s important to stop and reflect.

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