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This Texas Optometry Office Figured Out How to Get More Patients to Buy Daily Disposables

To get them to as many patients as possible, she launched a subscription-based program.

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DINA MILLER, OD, HAD worked at 15-plus optometry practices by the time she opened Spanish Oaks Eyecare & Optical Boutique in Cedar Park, TX, last year. “I had learned a lot about what I wanted my practice to be like,” she says. The result is an independent, “patient-centered” optometry office and optical with an ABO-advanced certified optician and a doctor who strives “to put myself in [patients’] shoes to see the entire experience, not just the eye exam, from their point of view.” Given the ocular health benefits and range of available parameters, Miller believes daily disposables are the best option for nearly every contacts patient. But they are costlier than other modalities, prohibitively so for some patients. To get them to as many patients as possible, she launched a subscription-based program.

THE IDEA

“We wanted to be able to offer dailies to all patients. The rebates on new daily lenses are incredible,” Miller says. By offering a subscription plan, she figured, patients could apply their insurance benefits and take advantage of manufacturers’ rebates while paying monthly, instead of $500 or more for lenses all at once. For a modest initial payment (or the vision plan contact lens allowance) and then 11 automatic monthly payments starting the following month, Spanish Oaks orders and holds the annual supply, dispensing every 90 days. Since the supply is invoiced to the patient, they can utilize the manufacturer’s rebate, further reducing cost.

THE EXECUTION

Let’s say a 90 pack of Lens X dailies retails for $75 or an annual cost of $600. Spanish Oaks adds a small “subscription fee” to cover the cost of a year’s storage (say, $25 for a total of $625). If the patient has vision benefits, that is applied as the first month’s down payment; if they have a $150 contact lens benefit, it’s subtracted from the total ($625-$150=$475). The balance is divided by 11 to calculate the monthly charge, or $43.18. “Overall,” says Miller, “the price is slightly higher than purchasing outright, but this allows the patient to submit the rebate, as they signed an agreement to purchase the annual supply, and $43.18/month is much more reasonable than $475 all at once.” 

The subscription allows Spanish Oaks to provide the best lenses without unnecessary risk. “The cost is paid prior to dispensing, and additional staff time is offset by the subscription fee,” she says. 

The biggest challenge was putting together the patient agreement that authorizes the monthly credit card charge and spells out the program’s details. 

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THE REWARDS

The response has been great. “Patients like having the option of daily lenses without the up-front cost,” Miller says. “It’s also a blessing to families with multiple members wearing dailies.”   

The main benefit is an increase in daily contact lens sales, but it also builds loyalty by showing that “we are looking out for their best interests, both visual and financial,” Miller says. Finally, there’s the boost to optical sales. “Patients are more likely to purchase glasses when they aren’t paying up front for their contacts,” she says. 

Miller says the basic requirements are straightforward. “If you have a few extra shelves, and your staff can spare 20-30 minutes per month running credit cards, this program will probably work for you.”

Do It Yourself: Contact Lens Subscription Plan

  • 1. TRGO FIGURE. Check wholesale costs. “Make sure the down payment covers the first 90-day supply, in case they change their mind,” Miller says.
  • 2. AS VALUE ADDED. The benefits grow with daily multifocals. In Spanish Oaks’ case, $81.64/month vs. $1,048 annually ($898 after insurance).
  • 3. AS RUN IT BY THE REPS. Miller spoke to several contact lens companies, who agreed she was within the guidelines of their rebates.
  • 4. CIINSURERS IN THE LOOP. . “Insurance and vision plans… allow us to provide the best lenses… without [imposing] a formulary list,” Miller says.
  • 5. GO DELIVERING THE GOODS. Spanish Oaks offers subscribers the option of having lenses mailed for an additional charge of $3/month.

After years covering some of the farther flung corners of the world of business journalism, Heath has more recently focused on covering the efforts of independent eyecare professionals to negotiate a fast-changing industry landscape. Contact him at heath@smartworkmedia.com.

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Best of the Best

How This Colorado Practice’s ‘Office Culture Blueprint’ is Boosting Referrals

And how they persuaded their team to embrace a new mindset.

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EYE CARE CENTER of Colorado Springs, CO, has a large specialty contact lens practice that owes its success in part to the referrals it receives from ODs and MDs in Colorado Springs, Denver, Pueblo and as far away as California. You don’t maintain a referral-driven practice without top-level service, and with so much on the line, sometimes it pays to codify what’s expected of staff. But no one responds to a laundry list of rules. “We have found we have to re-educate ourselves and any new team members we hire,” says co-owner Sara Whitney, OD, and this realization recently led the practice to develop its own “office culture blueprint.”

THE IDEA

Translating a vague desire to get the best out of your team into a set of tangible principles is harder than it sounds. “We made a feeble attempt to create a culture statement a few years ago,” recalls Whitney, “and we never finished it because we didn’t really know how to implement it.” Practice founder and co-owner Dr. Reed Bro eventually came across the concept of “above the line behavior,” an approach based on personal responsibility. Whitney says the beauty of this concept is that it encourages “behaviors that create a positive event for the next person in the chain.” The goal is to “resist the temptation to blame…to complain for the sake of complaining, or become defensive.”

Dr. Reed Bro and Dr. Sara Whitney

THE EXECUTION

Whitney, Bro and office manager Mindi Andrade developed what would become the office’s cultural blueprint over several months. It takes its starting point from a few core beliefs. These are matched with a set of encouraged behaviors and desired outcomes. Your core beliefs, Whitney says, “are the reasons you decided to start practicing optometry or open a business.”

Once these basic elements were finalized, the managers initiated a transitional phase in which they used the vocabulary that forms the core of the blueprint in day-to-day interactions with one another and with staff. “We did not present the blueprint to the team until we were comfortable that we were able to personally apply the core beliefs to any situation,” Whitney says. They launched it at the beginning of January, when people are making resolutions and personal improvements. “We printed up the culture matrix on a card for each member of the team.”

Whitney says you can tell right away which staff will be on board and who will resist. “We lost three team members around the time the blueprint was rolled out. It may have just been a personal decision for the employee, but it can cause you to momentarily doubt your decision to demand these behaviors.” It’s important to be strong and stick to your guns at this stage, she says. Remember that the key beliefs you identified as the basis for your blueprint are important. “They are the reason you get up in the morning and come to work,” she says. “Expectations … make some people uncomfortable. They will resist change, and you have to let them move on.”

THE REWARDS

Whitney says the blueprint has delivered its targeted outcomes: an enhanced sense of community, patient satisfaction, trust, loyalty, adherence to treatment plans, and referrals. But there are personal benefits too. “I think those who have embraced this new mindset will be able to see it spilling over into their personal lives.”

Ultimately, Eye Care Center of Colorado Springs’ aim with the blueprint was to cultivate behaviors that grow the business, and so far, that aim is being met. Says Whitney: “We have developed the mindset that being presented with a challenge is our opportunity to get ahead of the problem and to possibly even be someone’s hero.”

Do It Yourself: Develop an Office Culture

  • DON’T RUSH IT. “Take time to define your beliefs over a period of weeks or months,” says Whitney.
  • WALK THE WALK. “Live out behaviors that support your beliefs,” Whitney advises. “You are the biggest example of your practice culture.”
  • TWO-WAY STREET. An office culture doesn’t have to be static: Survey your team periodically and ask for feedback.
  • COMMUNICATE. If you don’t, a blueprint is just a list tacked to a wall.
  • STAY STRONG. A change like this might cost you an employee. But stay the course or it’s not worth the paper it’s written on.

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Best of the Best

Maryland Optician Makes the Most of Its Expansive Front Window Space

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Visions Extraordinary Eyewear
frederick, md

WITH 60 YEARS of experience between them, Meline Baron and Phil Bromwell of Visions Extraordinary Eyewear know a thing or two about attracting clients. Lesson No. 1? Wow them with windows.

THE IDEA

The two, who’ve been a couple for 21 years, started Visionary Opticians 18 years ago, rebranded to Visions Extraordinary Eyewear in 1999, and  moved to their current location in downtown Frederick in 2003. With their tony new shop, a former shoe store, came more than 10 feet of glass windows facing the street. Time to get creative! Visions, which only carries one of each frame, prides itself on offering brands from around the world — Studio3 Occhiali, Ptolemy48, Wissing, Roger and Rain City, among others — collections not available at chains, and once they’re gone, they’re gone. “We don’t duplicate or repeat,” says Baron. In addition to an exclusive frame experience, they offer a wide selection of premium lenses from Varilux, Zeiss, Hoya, Seiko, Transitions, and more, with an expedient turnaround time thanks to an in-house lab manned by Bromwell. What’s more, they don’t do advertising or social media; those windows tell their story.

THE EXECUTION

“I change out the large window seasonally, although not necessarily with season-specific themes,” says Baron. “My current large window is focused around primarily four collections. The ‘F’ theme of Flowers, Foliage, Feathers, Fabric.”

Meline Baron is the brain behind her store’s window displays.

In fact, her current small spring window uses colorful tissue boxes adorned with cute flowers and birds. These are attached to the wall with push-pins, the frames displayed on top.

Looking back, Baron has her favorite windows. “I painted upholsterer’s springs for my ‘Spring For A New Look!’ window. Also, I’ve used my husband’s ties and ‘guy-centric’ books in my ‘The Guys Have It’ small window display, and colorful flip-flops to display sunglasses,” she explains. “And there’s the time I used bottles of Joy dishwashing liquid for my ‘The Joy of Spex’ window.”

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Props are occasionally reused, but in new ways. “Windows always evolve and things wear out, so I am always looking for new things to keep it fresh,” she says.

THE RESULTS

Baron describes her store as “very layered” and says she’s often surprised and tickled when the people she least expects notice stuff and comment. Customers often say they like the feel of the place. “Many visitors and customers comment that they love to come into the shop because there is always something interesting to look at. And the more they like being here, the more likely they are to find something else they want.” It’s a philosophy that works. Vision’s revenue went up 20 percent since moving to this location.

But for Baron and Bromwell, it’s time for a new adventure. The couple is looking to retire and has put Visions up for sale. The good news is that Baron is happy to continue consulting on the windows for the new owners!

Do It Yourself: Attract Passersby with Your Windows

  •  Look out for new  props. “I’m always thinking, ‘This is kind of cool,’” says Baron. “I can be seen in any kind of store taking off my glasses to see if they’ll sit on an object for a display.”
  • Pick a color and switch out seasonal props to extend a display’s life. November to February, Baron’s focus is red, using Christmas props until January, then Valentine’s props.
  • Think about lighting. Baron even changes the bulbs in the lights in the windows to keep it interesting.  And she is constantly stocking up on fairy lights at Home Depot.
  • Be organized. Baron rents a storage locker for her materials, and has a “tool box” full of push pins, screw-in hooks, a hammer, and plate racks to prop up signage and posters.
  • Use your displays to convert sales. Color themes plus a “Color of the Month” frame discount give Baron “a way of having a sale without seeming like a discounter.”
  • And a don’t!Don’t use anything that can melt! “I once had a zyl Traction frame and a Kawasaki frame with a plastic temple-tip fall off their perch and onto a light fixture and melt,” she says.

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Best of the Best

Tennessee Practice Throws Itself an Epic Birthday Party, Creates New Tradition

This patient-appreciation event made for a great business-building tool.

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ANDREW AND ELIZABETH HOWARD, optometrists and co-owners of LaFollette Eye Clinic in Jacksboro, TN, pride themselves on a level of service that has patients coming in from Ohio, Texas, and Florida. As the practice’s 30th anniversary approached in October last year, they decided a one-day trunk show wouldn’t reach as many people as they wanted. An occasion like this warranted something special.

THE IDEA

Celebrate a 30-Year Milestone

“We like to capitalize on milestones as a way to generate interest, and the 30-year milestone was a great opportunity,” Andy recalls. When it comes to event planning, ideas at LaFollette are typically generated and fleshed out in-house by the practice’s eight-person Leadership Team, which collectively boasts decades in eyecare. But, they also enjoy looking at other practices and sharing ideas with other doctors. “This event was a mixture of the two techniques. We traditionally hold one or two open houses or trunk shows a year, but we had never held a week-long celebration,” Howard says.

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THE EXECUTION

Diamonds and Pearls

It took the team several meetings to brainstorm ideas, then organize them. Various aspects were delegated to different leads on the team. Says Andy: “Involving the team builds engagement, loyalty and morale, and helped us keep our costs down.”

A “Diamonds and Pearls” theme was chosen. According to Andy, these are not only “modern and traditional anniversary gifts, but it’s also a great song by Prince.” The celebration itself featured giveaways, prizes, a 30-percent off sale, snacks and drinks all week, activities such as face-painting for kids, cornhole, and a “photo booth” with a retro-style instant camera for patients who used ’80s-themed props or their own new glasses for digital images that were shared on social media. In addition, demonstrations were held with reps from local crafters and artists’ groups — even a Lion’s Club member who brought in leader dogs for the blind. (A donation drive was held for the Lion’s Club.)

A local artist’s association was invited to bring in artwork; these were joined on LaFollette’s walls by “storyboards” highlighting the practice’s services, including photographs going back to the ’80s. Long-time patients and ex-staff members joined the celebration, and the optical even changed the music to ’80s hits for the week.

The costs were “minimal” given the scale of the event. A giant eyeglasses balloon sculpture was the most expensive item. “We had enough cupcakes for everyone, but they were made by a team member who is a wonderful baker.” All giveaways were donated by local businesses in exchange for marketing.

THE REWARDS

‘Too Fun to Wait’

The biggest surprise to Andy was how many people showed up just to wish LaFollette a happy anniversary. Sales were up during the week, but that was secondary to the goal of celebrating and thanking patients, he says. “It was more fun than we’ve had in a long time; that by itself is worth the effort.” He adds: “Now we need to begin looking for another excuse to have a week-long celebration… We had too much fun to wait 10 more years!”

PHOTO GALLERY (10 IMAGES)

Do It Yourself: Hold A 
Patient-Centered Celebration

  • ALL HANDS ON. The key, says Andy, is involving the whole team. “So many people have different talents, and an event like this allows that talent to shine.”
  • CROSS-PROMOTE. Talk to neighboring businesses and see if they’ll contribute prizes in exchange for some free marketing.
  • GO WITH A PRO. Failing to plan is planning to fail. If you don’t have the HR depth that LaFollette has, consider using a professional event planner.
  • WIDE FOCUS. To foster a sense of community, think beyond eyewear. According to Andy, the leader dog for the blind was one of the hits of the week.
  • PICK A MOTIF. Choosing a theme gives you a hook to hang activities on. Practice turning 20? Ask your stylist for “The Rachel.”

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