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To Succeed in Eyecare, Get Out and Meet Your Neighbors

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[Editor’s note: This is one of three honorable mention winners in INVISION’s essay contest. Eyecare professionals submitted essays in response to the prompt, “If you could order all eyecare pros to do one specific thing, and they had to listen to you, what would it be? And why would you ask them to do it?”]

I order you to meet your neighbors and become the eyecare professional they will rely on.

I love being an optician. I just love it. I live it. I breathe it. And not just from 9-5. I live and breathe it eight days a week.

I can’t order any of my peers to love their profession as much as I do. I mean, you either love it or you don’t. I can only imagine for those who don’t love what they do, it’s just a job. That’s very sad to me.

But for those of you who do love this as much as I do, I would order you to shout it from the rooftops. Tell everyone in the community what you do and why you do it. Create what I call your Eyedentity!

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I’ve been an optician for over 30 years, but a few months back, I started a new job with an established optometric practice. The doctor is one of the nicest people I’ve ever met and he has a pretty steady practice. I had asked him if he would mind if I drum up some new patients for him. He said he’d love it as long as he didn’t have to spend a lot of money.

I asked him (OK, I demanded!) that he allow me to redesign his business cards and make some for me and the other optician. He agreed.

Once I got my cards, I was on my way. During my lunch breaks, and sometimes after work, I’ll walk around the business neighborhood and go into the mom-and-pop stores and even the big chain stores (like CVS or Sprouts) and engage in conversation with as many employees as I can.

“I can’t order any of my peers to love their profession as much as I do. I mean, you either love it or you don’t. I can only imagine for those who don’t love what they do, it’s just a job. That’s very sad to me.”

My “script” varies depending on who I meet, but it’s generally saying I got a new job down the street and I just wanted to check out your store. Inevitably, I am asked, “Oh, where do you work?” and I’m off to the races.

“I’m the lead optician at Dr. Alan Clark’s office. Y’know, the eye doctor down the street? You should come in and see us. Seriously, we have some great eyewear and really cool sunglasses. Here (and I give them my business card and write 20 percent off on the back), my name is Lisa. I can give 20 percent off to people who work in the neighborhood. Come in and we’ll take very good care of you. It’ll be so much fun picking out your next pair of glasses. It’ll be just as exciting for me as it will for you.”

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Would you like to know if this works? Within three weeks the doctor told me we’ve been having record days by far and consistently. Not bad considering he’s been in practice for 25 years.

Why do I do this? For several reasons.

  1. Because it just makes sense to meet your neighbors. It’s neighborly.
  2. It has an incredible effect on the practice.
  3. I truly believe we have the best doctor and opticians in town. It wouldn’t feel right to me if people went somewhere else for inferior service.
  4. Did I mention that I love this?

Lisa Trippi, ABOC, works for Dr. Alan Clark in Mountain View, CA, and has been a “go to” optician for 30 years in the San Francisco Bay Area. She has successfully overseen the optical side of optometric practices as an office manager, frame buyer, lead optician and mentor. She values her relationships with patients, co-workers and industry representatives alike. In her free time, she enjoys time with her grandchildren and taking scenic drives.

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Robert Bell

In Sales There Are Not Two Sides to Every Story.
 There Is Only One — the Customer’s Side

You’re about to get much better at selling.

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YOU MAY NOT REALIZE THIS, but you’re a salesperson. Yes, I know, you don’t see yourself as such … you see yourself as an eye doctor or optician or ophthalmic tech or office manager in an optometric practice, etc. Yet, you are a salesperson as well. Why? Because whether you know it or not, if you’re not selling your eyecare services and products, you’re out of business.

I’m sorry I’m the one who had to break this news to you but, then again, who better than a professional salesperson and sales trainer?

Podcast: Why Optical (and Especially Optical Retail) Is Lagging Behind Other Industries
INVISION Podcast

Podcast: Why Optical (and Especially Optical Retail) Is Lagging Behind Other Industries

Podcast: What the Heck is Marketing? And What Should ECPs Focus on to Attract New Clients?
INVISION Podcast

Podcast: What the Heck is Marketing? And What Should ECPs Focus on to Attract New Clients?

Podcast: More Ways to Motivate Your Own Eyecare Business Team
INVISION Podcast

Podcast: More Ways to Motivate Your Own Eyecare Business Team

But, there’s a difference between you and me. I’m pretty good at selling and, you? Well … you’re about to get much better at it.

Do Your Homework

Know what you’re selling. Everyone who works in the business should be familiar with all the services and products offered. Know them inside and out, up and down, and know it better than anyone else … especially the customer.

Know Your Customer

Understand as much as you can about them and how what you’re about to sell them will precisely be of benefit to them.

Know Your Competition!

I don’t mean, “know of them.” I mean, know them!! Know what they’re good at and what they suck at. Know what they offer. When you know this, you’ll understand a lot better how to excel at what you do. You’ll understand what differentiates you from them. How can you expect your customers or patients to understand this if you don’t?

Ask, and Ye Shall Receive

Now that you’ve done your homework, and you’re so incredibly prepared, you’re probably bursting at the seams with all this knowledge and passion for what you do. You can’t wait to tell your customers about everything you know. Yeah, don’t! Why? Because you’ll come off as pushy. You’ll come off as a know-it-all. You’ll come across as it being all about you when it should be all about them!

So, ask them questions. Ask them if they have any concerns. Ask them about what they’re hoping you can do for them. Ask them what their visual and/or style goals are. Ask. Keep on asking questions. Oh, and listen! Listen very carefully.

You’ll gather all the information you’ll need to help them with their specific challenges. You’ll hear about what really matters to them… and this is where “doing your homework” comes into play.

Make a Connection and Establish Trust

Without a doubt, salespeople cannot sell if there is no connection or trust. But, here’s the good news: by asking genuine questions about what’s important to the customer/patient, you’ve already begun making that connection. You’ve showed them you’re concerned about them and not about yourself or “making the sale.”
When you begin to share with them (“share” being the key word) the solutions to their needs, they’ll need to understand how this benefits them. Share with them a story of how this solution was able to help another customer/patient (without violating HIPAA laws, please) in a similar situation. Share with them the success of the product(s) you’re helping them acquire. This is when trust begins to become established.

Are There Two Sides to Every Story?

Not in sales, there aren’t. There is only one side. The customer’s side.

Even though you may, physically, be sitting on the other side of the dispensing table from them, truthfully, you’re really on the same side.

How important do you think it is for your customer/patient to know this? Critically important! Your customers/patients need to know you’re on their side, that you’re partners, together, in helping them achieve their goals and acquire those items to get them there.

When your customers/patients realize your genuine desire to help make them successful, make their lives more dynamic with the right vision solutions, your sales will dramatically increase and it will make you feel incredibly good.

You’re a salesperson? Yes.

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Danielle Richardson

How to Be Healthier Now

4 easy tips you can implement today to start living a healthier lifestyle.

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BEING HEALTHY” IS ONE of those oversized goals we often leave to next week, next month, or next year. In celebration of this issue’s “How To” theme, I want to share easy swaps you can make to center your health now.

Most Americans live a sedentary lifestyle, with six in 10 adults suffering from a chronic disease like heart disease or diabetes. Beyond the physical, we know healthcare workers experience above-average rates of anxiety, depression and burnout. As busy clinicians and optical professionals, it can be challenging to find the time to think about our health and wellbeing in practical terms because we don’t always make the best patients.

We’re largely marketed an image of health that is a two-hour morning routine complete with a workout, meditation and balanced breakfast. But real health is not about how complicated you can make your mornings, it’s about creating habits and behaviors that help you feel well.

Below are some easy tips you can implement to start living a healthier lifestyle now.

Clearly Define Health Goals

Health, when left as an abstract concept, can be difficult to define. Instead, focus on your health goals and the intention behind them. Stress reduction? Lose weight? Gain muscle? Lower blood pressure? Spending some time clearly defining your health goals allows you to better focus your limited energy on the activities that will help you achieve them.

Track Key Metrics

Taking the stairs is the oldest health advice in the book, but have you thought about tracking the steps using your smartphone? Using technology as a tool to track your health metrics can help keep you on track. Goal setting is key, but tracking your progress is equally important and provides a positive psychological impact to keep you motivated. You can use pre-installed health applications on your smartphone or download apps specific to tracking your movement. No matter what metric you use, monitoring progress through a health app can encourage you to make better choices throughout the day.

Choose the Healthier Side Item

When eating out, aim to order the healthier side 80 percent of the time. Think sautéed vegetables instead of fries, salad instead of garlic bread, grilled shrimp instead of fried. These small changes accumulate over time to create a new habit. Choosing a healthier option isn’t about deprivation, it’s about creating a strong foundation that allows you to indulge occasionally without hindering progress towards your goals.

Focus on Nutrition

While there are agreed upon vitamins and minerals that every person needs, the amount and types vary based on the individual. Consult with your primary care doctor or nutritionist to explore the resources available to help you learn about optimal nutritional requirements based on your specific health goals. Nutritional testing can provide insight and information about deficiencies you may have and what supplementation is most effective. In addition to personal consultations, many new health tech companies offer in-home nutritional testing and coaching. Individualized nutrition is the future of health and wellness because nutrition is the missing component for many in their journey to creating a healthier life.

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3 Hiring Strategies for Optometry Practices

With the war for talent showing no signs of letting up, it’s a great time to revisit your recruiting efforts.

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WHEN IT COMES TO hiring, optometry practices have their work cut out for them. As if the current job market wasn’t competitive enough, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts optometrist and optician jobs will grow at 18 and 15 percent, respectively, through 2026 — faster than other industries. Couple this with a widening skills gap and it is easy to see that optometry practices must turn a closer eye to hiring strategies. As you grow your practice, set your sights on these three strategies for winning the war for talent.

Focus on Your Job Ad

Your job ad is exactly that­—an ad. It must be easy to read and compelling enough to capture the attention of candidates scrolling through pages and pages of openings.
Here are a few tips for creating an effective ad:

Hook your reader. Make your ad stand out with an enticing lead-in and include something unique about the position or practice in the headline (e.g., “Optometrist — Growing Practice, Sign-On Bonus”).

Embrace SEO. Ensure your ad is found by the right candidates by following search engine optimization (SEO) best practices and incorporating keywords in the job description. Keywords comprise industry terms, desired skills, location information, and other elements that applicants may include in their queries.

Be specific. Describe what the open position entails, emphasize growth opportunities, and provide a glimpse of what it’s like to work at your practice.

Close with clarity. Without a clear call to action and instructions for applying, you may lose out on a great hire; note when interviews will be scheduled or when the applicant can expect to hear from you.

A Marketer’s Lens

Take a cue from marketing and treat your candidates as if they were a sales lead by keeping them engaged throughout the hiring process. Share information about your practice and emphasize your unique company culture. Are hours flexible? Do you provide paid time off (PTO)? Do you offer a wellness program?

A recent survey of optometry professionals revealed health/medical insurance, compensation/bonuses, and flexible scheduling as the top three most desired workplace benefits. If you offer these, incorporate them into your ad.

Build Your Talent Pipeline

How many times have you had a “silver medalist” candidate — that one who was not quite the right fit? Or, maybe the silver medalist narrowly missed out to someone just slightly more qualified. Odds are you politely turned them down and they moved on.

Keep a short list of silver medalists and other potential hires on the backburner. By building this talent pipeline, you can quickly fill future positions without having to start from scratch. As you build your pipeline, maintain communication with your runners-up. For example, include these applications in your email marketing database so they receive occasional updates from your practice, or simply add them as a connection on LinkedIn.

With the war for talent showing no signs of letting up, it’s a great time to revisit your recruiting efforts — even if you aren’t actively hiring. These strategies will equip your practice with qualified personnel who will help keep your patients happy and healthy.

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