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Ways ECPs Are Benefiting from Short Intro Videos for Their Practices

Practice introduction videos have multiple benefits, and these days they’re a cinch to produce.

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Introducing yourself to potential patients and customers, eliminating the element of surprise for first-timers, and boosting your SEO and Google rankings: Producing a professional-looking intro video for your practice has multiple benefits and doesn’t have to bust your marketing budget. Check out this handful of practices that have embraced multimedia.

Precision Vision

Edmund, OK

Precision Vision in Edmund, OK, designed their video to help patients get to know the practice before coming in. “The video was structured to try and eliminate surprises,” says owner Dr. Selina McGee. It plays on the website and her Facebook page, boosting SEO across channels and driving traffic to the practice. McGee hired a videographer to shoot and edit the video for about $800. “I wanted it to look completely professional.” McGee’s main goal was boosting SEO, but now that she’s got the video up and running she concedes she could probably do an even better job of getting patients to see it. She’s also come to realize it has other potential benefits. “Customers always want to see the real you, so create something authentic that shows your personality,” she advises. “Have fun with it. Remember, your patients and customers can’t buy YOU down the street.”

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Spanish Oaks Eyecare

Cedar Park, TX

Spanish Oaks Eyecare’s video involved some luck. It was professionally done. “However,” says owner Dr. Dina Miller, “we were approached by [a crew] wanting to use our waiting area for a film. So in exchange they offered to do it at no charge.” The video walks the audience through Spanish Oaks’ office, with both exterior and interior shots, before showing Miller examining a patient and reviewing their optomap results. It ends with the patient in the optical working with her optician Bob. “During that part, we let people know how we’re different than most opticals and why ­— we carry only independent frame lines.” The video, whose main goal Miller says is to introduce Spanish Oaks to potential patients and customers, is posted on Facebook. “It’s a great way to … make yourself ‘real’ and familiar.”
She advises other ECPs to make sure the video features actual staff. “That’s one of the most important parts; making it personable. I was tempted to have someone else sit in for me but at the end of the day, I knew that would really take away from the video and its purpose.” And don’t be afraid to edit: Miller opted for voice overs, as they had felt uncomfortable speaking to camera, and added captions for things she wanted the audience to know (for example, the fact that her optician is one of just two people with an active American Board of Opticianry Advanced certification in her part of Texas). “Also,” she advises, “consider having parts where you and possibly your main staff talk to the camera about what’s important to you, what sets you apart from others — not the generic ‘We have the best customer service/patient care,’ etc.”

Ziegler Leffingwell Eyecare

New Berlin, WI

According to Dr. Dave Ziegler, Ziegler Leffingwell Eyecare hit on the idea of making an intro video as a way of giving “strong visual exposure of what it is like to be in our office.” And they found a striking way to do just that, hiring a real estate photographer to use a drone, which opens the video hovering outside the front of the office, then enters through the front door and flies throughout the office. “This flight path through the office is the way our patients experience our office during a typical eye exam,” he says. The video boasts a script written by Ziegler himself; he hired a professional to do the voice over for maximum impact. He felt it was important that the video should be less than a minute long; it’s now posted to the practice’s website, one among many features that he says win their website routine praise. Asked whether the time and expense that went into making the video were worth it, he replies that more than that, “it is necessary” for any practice, in his view.

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Dr. Bladh OD

Diamond Bar, CA

The folks at Dr. Bladh OD, a Diamond Bar, CA practice, understand the power of videos to increase a business’s Google ranking by boosting the amount of content that links back to its website. They signed up with a company called Promo! that allows them to make multiple 15-second videos. “The [Promo!] site has a ton of content with professional videos to use.” Once you edit it, the video is yours to keep. So the video is professionally done, but everything added to it is DIY.
“Video marketing gets so much more traction than pictures or boring blog posts,” reports Josh Bladh. The videos are similar, but each has its own emphasis. Most feature music and a few lines of text to get people’s attention. “Search engines are putting more emphasis on video content so this seemed like the best option to get our foothold with video before paying for anything professional,” he says.
The videos are posted to Facebook and Instagram. “We will add videos to blog posts on our website where relevant.”
In the practice’s experience, consumers typically need six to eight touch points before they’ll call and commit to an exam. So, using videos to boost these contact points for the service’s relatively low monthly fee makes sense. Bladh warns ECPs to do their homework before signing up for such a service, however, as some companies will give you a hard time if you attempt to use any unused video credits after letting your subscription lapse.

Anthony Aiden Opticians

New York, NY

Anthony Aiden Opticians went for a more adult approach in their video, a 30-second short about … a misunderstanding. It may seem like male fantasy, but optician Anthony Gaggi swears it’s based on reality. “My sister’s friend was a stylist; she was working alone one night and…” Well, we don’t want to spoil it; suffice it to say whether you find it hilarious, titillating or offensive, there’s no denying it conveys the store’s edgy, fashion-conscious style. “My goal,” Gaggi says, “was to bring a high-quality fashion video to my website.” The video is also displayed in the store’s windows. A friend who works in TV offered his services for free; Gaggi says clients love it.

After years covering some of the farther flung corners of the world of business journalism, Heath has more recently focused on covering the efforts of independent eyecare professionals to negotiate a fast-changing industry landscape. Contact him at heath@smartworkmedia.com.

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When You’re Passionate About Eye Care, the Right Technology Matters

Lisa Genovese, O.D., strives to give her patients the very best. At Insight Eye Care’s multiple locations, Dr. Genovese provides optimal care for her patients using the Reichert® Phoroptor® VRx Digital Refraction System. In this second Practice Profile Video from Reichert’s “Passionate About Eye Care” series, take a closer look and see how this eye care professional achieved a better work-life balance with equipment that’s designed and engineered in the U.S.A.

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Benchmarks

These 6 Practices Found Ways to Get Patients to Buy Annual Contact Lens Supplies

Have you tried these ideas for boosting sales?

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THE MEDICAL BENEFITS alone — avoiding the hazards that come with stretching out the supply or otherwise abusing the lenses — should be enough to sell most CL patients on the advantages of an annual supply. Or failing that, just the convenience of not having to re-order. If only the business of optometry were so simple. Alas, getting patients to do what’s best for their vision seems to require sweetening the deal. Here’s how six ECPs entice patients to sign up for contact lens deals — or otherwise make CL sales work for them.

Shoreline Eyecare
Shoreline, WA

Erika Tydor, OD, at Shoreline Eyecare says BoomContacts.com has helped her practice, describing it as a “flexible, real-time tool that can be used in-store as a tablet or on-screen, and can also be sent to customers by text or email for follow-up.” BoomContacts simplifies product information, allowing the user to toggle comparisons of order types, between monthly and annual sales, or between products, and shows a clear quote for purchase. Customers can pay through text or email. Tydor says the system’s strength lies in giving patients a visual breakdown of the cost. “I believe it has kept patients that would have gone elsewhere in the house, so I see it as moneymaker,” she says.

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Lifetime Eyecare
Jenison, MI

Lifetime Eyecare has had success offering half off plano sunglasses with a year supply of contacts. Optical manager Tiffany Firer says CLs are moneymakers when you consider the whole experience. “CL wearers tend to come in more for their yearly exams and many still purchase backup glasses.” She says belonging to Vision Source gives the practice access to “some amazing contact lenses at a great price point.” She urges ECPs thinking of trying their own offer to remember the culture of their practice and that how you message the offer does a lot for how patients approach the discount.

Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates
Citrus Heights, CA

In addition to applying manufacturers’ rebates for a year’s supply, Dr. Texas Smith finds CLs allow him to offer the kind of service that generates great word of mouth. He puts together a Vacation Kit of one-day contacts for travelers and offers kid athletes daily lenses as spares. “This is full service eyecare, and may generate a positive Yelp review,” he says. And here’s a free tip: “During an exam on a high hyperope or presbyope, I always offer to put on a pair of contacts so the patient can see the frame they will pick out for their new Rx. Sometimes that yields a new CL patient.”

Insights Eyecare
Manhattan, KS

In a twist on the usual “discounted or free frames with an annual supply of CLs” model, Insights Eyecare offers a 20 percent discount on contacts when purchasing a fully loaded pair of glasses. The goal is to give patients the incentive to purchase from an office rather than a grey market retailer. Says Lindsey Pulford: “They know their contacts are supplied and stored in a safe environment while also supporting a local business. If they purchase the glasses — this is also with no insurance involved — then we are making the total profit on the glasses. And let’s face it, every CL wearer should own a pair of glasses.” Pulford says she notices that presbyopes are the most likely to show interest. “They are a bit older, understand the value of backup glasses more, and know they may not always want to wear the CL.”

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Monson Eyecare Center
Owatonna, MN

Kim Hilgers at Monson Eyecare Center says patients have responded well to the MyACUVUE subscription program through Vistakon. Patients with a valid CL prescription can sign up for monthly free delivery and are charged monthly as well, which makes an annual supply easier to afford. The program works with insurance benefits, but the practice sets pricing and is not charged for participating. “Compliance of contact lens wearing schedule seems to directly increase with purchase of an annual supply, so it’s a win-win,” says Hilgers, adding that the program has made the competitive team at Monson more aware of the need to get patients into an annual supply right away. “One of our clinics increased annual supplies by 7 percent. That may not sound like much, but our capture rate for all contact lens orders was nearly 80 percent last year.”

Thomas Vision Clinic
Leesville, LA

Thomas Vision Clinic has learned there’s more profit to be made in offering free inexpensive products than offering a dollar amount off a year supply. An annual supply of contacts now gets patients a free pair of non-branded sunglasses, a contact lens case, manufacturer’s rebate and 20 percent off back-up glasses and/or designer sunglasses. “We noticed a pretty big increase in the number of contact lens Rxs walking, and had to come up with a game plan to keep them in the office,” says Jessica Gattis, adding that VSP patients are the most likely to take them up on it. Thomas Vision also lets patients know that should they lose or tear a lens, they will replace it. “They actually seem more impressed by this than the free sunglasses,” jokes Gattis.

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Benchmarks

Harnessing the Power of the Selfie to Boost Social Media Engagement, Drive Foot Traffic … and Have Fun

These five practices added an extra dimension to the optical experience and became genuine destinations.

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ONE OF THE defining characteristics of our modern retail world is that no purchase or experience, whether it’s buying sneakers or sitting down to a gourmet burrito, is really complete until it’s been photographed and posted to social media. iPads are even showing up in clothing store changing rooms. Like it or not, people are going to bring cameras into your store; the question is how to take control of that experience. Selfie walls or stations are a great way of doing this; they grow your social media following, increase customer engagement, drive foot traffic and boost your store’s fun quotient. There are sophisticated options out there—fully integrated systems for retailers, like Halo by Simple Booth, or The Digital Booth’s rental services, which are great for events—but you can get results using a smartphone and a colorfully branded sliver of free wall space in your optical. These five practices show us how it’s done.

Falls City Eye Care
Louisville, KY

Falls City Eye Care boasts two features that get customers taking snapshots of themselves. One is their trusty Polaroid camera—patients and friends are urged to snap a couple of photos, post one on a cork board in the optical and take the other home. The other is a 12-foot sculpture of a pair of frames in the front yard made especially for owners Dr. Michael and Theresa Martorana by a local artist. Falls City Eyecare now sees a steady stream of small groups and individuals stopping by to take selfies with the giant specs. City ordinances prevent them from labeling the sculpture, but customers usually find ways of slipping in a store-related hashtag themselves, Theresa says. “We were easy to walk right by on a busy fun street. Once the sculpture was created and painted, we became a destination.”

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Eye Love Optometry
Pinole, CA

EYE LOVE OPTOMETRY’s iPad-based selfie photo station allows photos to be taken and sent to smartphones and e-mail or shared on social media. Branded galleries can be made public, while owner Park L. Hsieh, OD and his team are sent marketing reports to track performance. Patients are given a “Selfie Card” that says, “We love that you love EYE LOVE OPTOMETRY! This is a ‘SELFIE CARD,’ so share your photos of your new eyewear with friends on INSTAGRAM/FACEBOOK.” The station uses Simple Booth’s Halo software, which makes the service fully customizable. “The appearance of the selfies taken are all consistent and in line with our desired brand,” says Hsieh. The sharing function leads to re-engagement long after the experience is over, he adds. “It’s a wonderful word-of-mouth marketing tool, which I think is invaluable.”

Eye Candy
Delafield and Mequon, WI

Eye Candy has smartly branded, professional-looking selfie stations at both of its locations in the Milwaukee area. The stations themselves are alcoves bound by three floor-to-ceiling walls, each covered in custom vinyl wallpaper with the Eye Candy logo. Owner Paula Hornbeck says her original inspiration for the design was the photo wall at the Oscars. When customers pick up their new eyewear, staff ask if they can take a picture for the store’s social media. “Some are shy and decline,” says Hornbeck, “but most are flattered and we encourage them to show us their personality. They take a seat on the stool provided and we take candid shots of them rocking their new look with our iPad. Some are silly, but they always look like they’re happy and having fun.” Family members are invited to join in the photo session. The images are used on Eye Candy’s Facebook and Instagram accounts. Hornbeck says the selfie stations are a definite plus for the business. “Friends and family will go on our FB and IG to see their loved one’s new look and hopefully get excited about coming in to get their own.”

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The Eyeglass Lass
New London, CT

What became The Eyeglass Lass’s selfie wall wasn’t originally designed for that purpose. Owner Siobhan Burns wanted to do something with the wall, which is visible from the street. “Local artist Rob Guess covered the wall with funky, graffiti-style eyes. The next day I asked someone to pose in front of it for their ‘glamour shot’ and boom: the selfie/eyeball wall was born.” It’s a low-tech affair. Says Burns: “This one woman show uses portrait mode on her phone!” Simple as it is, the feature “has turned into something great; people recognize frames from posts on social media, and ask if they can have their picture taken before I get a chance to ask them,” Burns says. “If we only see airbrushed models with frames superimposed on their faces, we don’t stop and think, ‘Oh yeah—I could wear that!” Besides which, “It’s another special thing that will stick out to your clientele that wraps up the individual experience they’ve had working with you.”

Optical Connection
Studio City, CA

Armen and Rita Kanberian at Optical Connection had an empty wall they didn’t know what to do with. They decided they wanted an area dedicated to fun. “We imported this beautiful patterned wallpaper from the U.K. and custom ordered our neon light hashtag, #wellframed. This has been such a great hit with clients, especially during our fun trunk shows and events,” says Rita, adding that the feature is now a firm customer favorite. “Having a place to have fun and see yourself try on different frames is what we love… We had a client who bought a dress with glasses and came in just to take pictures.”

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Benchmarks

How 6 ECPs Designed, and Use, Their Business Cards

Even in a digital era, they find them to be an essential business tool.

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THE HUMBLE BUSINESS CARD is the great survivor of our tech-driven retail world. They have few rivals when it comes to making a memorable first impression; handed to departing customers they become little ambassadors for your uniqueness — and a great vehicle for impromptu incentives. They’ll be around as long as folks have pockets. But people don’t hold on to cards as long as they used to, so it’s important to make them memorable … There are many reasons that 27 million of them continue to be printed every day. We do urge you to spare a thought for the planet though and choose an eco-friendly option, of which there are many. (To name two, Rhode Island-based Moo makes cards out of cotton from T-shirt remnants, and Botanical Paperworks of Canada produces “plantable” cards made from seed paper.) We asked six ECPs to flash their cards and share with us how they use them.

Optical Oasis
Jupiter, FL

Julie Uram’s parents met an artist during a trip to Key West and happened to mention their daughter was opening an optical with a thatched roof and sand-covered floor. He designed her a card there and then. She hands them out both inside the store and out, and occasionally recruits relatives for the task. She has given cards to doctors who practice in town; on the back of these she stamps a $50 coupon. She believes customers that take them do hand them on: “I do ask customers how they found me and they will tell me from either a customer, a doctor, or Google.”

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Kenneth D. Boltz, OD
Dublin, OH

When Dr. Ken Boltz was setting up his new office in 2016, he needed a card with the new location and number in a hurry. He designed it himself, figuring he’d call a professional later. But his chart-inspired card went down so well, he kept it. “I keep cards with me at all times, as do all my staff. Each of us has a goal to hand out at least five each week.” They occasionally place a label on the back offering a complimentary retinal scan (value $39) with an expiration date. “This seems to stimulate those new contacts to call and make an appointment sooner rather than later,” he says.

Socialite Vision
Palm Beach Gardens, FL

Dr. Adam Ramsey sees his cards as an extension of his office, and spares no expense. He recently worked with a designer through numerous revisions “until the shine on the copper lettering was just right.” Given their ability to attract new clients, he advises, “don’t go low cost — go high quality.” He carries his cards everywhere and keeps a stash in his car. He also mails them to businesses from which he would like to receive referrals, including MDs without opticals and opticians without ODs. Not only does Ramsey ask staff to carry them, he even bought them fancy cardholders. “You need to instill that pride in them with their own cards. It’s their office too!” he says.

MacPherson Opticians
Arlington, VA

Kate Giroux worked with a designer to come up with MacPherson’s logo. She has them made for herself and staff, and they all carry them. She will use them to note a discount for customers who need an incentive to come in. Giroux adds that all of her referring doctors use her cards on her behalf when patients ask where they should have their eyeglasses fit and fabricated. “I have even had a few chain optical stores ask for my cards when those opticians cannot fit anything over a + or – 6D power lens or deal with complex compounded prism jobs.”

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Hudson River Eye Care
White Plains, NY

It pays to have a graphic artist in the family — Dr. Larah Alami’s cousin came up with Hudson River’s wordmark and card design. “We have our cards displayed in dispensers, but don’t use them much outside the business,” she says. Doctors and opticians all have named cards, but not support staff. The practice prints up separate cards for discounts on suns with a CL purchase, but hands out a large number of business cards to people stopping in who need to call for appointments. “I don’t think it’s possible to operate without them,” Alami says. “It’s probably one of the first things we did when we opened.”

Goodrich Optical
Lansing, MI

Owner Dave Goodrich’s self-designed cards are mostly intended for use outside the store, including by staff. “I give them to people I meet, I use them for ID at other businesses. I’ve left them with a tip after good service at a restaurant.” When it comes to incentive write-ins, he tends to leave that for his “repair” cards, which allow folks to put money spent on a solder or repair toward new glasses. “I know we get five to 10-plus customers a year from a business or repair card,” he says. “I consider them a marketing tool rather than advertising since they are usually given to people asking about our services.”

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