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Do You Or Don't You

You’re a Hard Working Bunch: 84% of Do Not Close for Any Extended Breaks

Do you ever close your practice for an extended period of time during the year?

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No: 84%

  • We used to close the entire week of Christmas for a few consecutive years. Then, we were pushed by our guests to be open. Mostly, the ones we informed in October about the planned closing. —— Ted McElroy, OD, Vision Source Tifton, Tifton, GA
  • We have multiple doctors so the need to is very small. We try and help staff coordinate time off when a doctor is gone. —— Zachary Dirks, OD, St. Peter and Belle Plaine Eyecare Centers, Saint Peter, MN
  • We close when needed for three-day weekends; that can include inventory, field trips, holidays, etc. We close for four days at Thanksgiving every year, that’s the longest we want to go. Any longer and there’s always a few emergency calls on the after-hours line, so it’s not like being “closed” really helps. —— Jen Heller, Pend Oreille Vision Care, Sandpoint, ID
  • Patients would not like that. We keep it rolling all year long. —— Sandy Slang, Ophthalmology Associates, Cudahy, WI
  • We don’t even close for lunch. With more and more medical services, patients need to know we will always take care of their needs. I also give out my cell phone and tell patients I would rather they not worry. They rarely call but when they do it’s usually a true emergency. So, the idea of closing for an extended period is never even a thought. —— Ken Boltz, OD, Kenneth D Boltz OD LLC, Dublin, OH
  • People expect us to be here. Always. There are plenty of stores in our area that do take extended vacations and we always pick up business during those times. —— Harris Decker, Eye Designs of Westchester, Scarsdale, NY
  • We try to keep service hours consistent. —— Robert McBeath, Edina Eye Physicians and Surgeons, Edina, MN
  • Patients are trying to get in for their exams and get new glasses before the end of the year. They are using Flex Spending money. We don’t want to lose them to a big box store, so our offices remain open. We take off one or two days max for the holidays. —— Leah Johnson, Central Texas Eye Center, San Marcos, TX
  • From our marketing, we have several same day emergency appointments per week and our doctor would rather pay a fill in doctor for the days that he’s gone than lose a potential client. —— Josh Bladh, Dr. Bladh OD, Diamond Bar, CA
  • We have enough staff to remain open. —— Richard Kemerling, Margolis Vision, Castle Rock, CO
  • The only time we close is if we are going to a convention to get CE. —— Frances Ann Layton, Eye Associates of South Georgia, Valdosta, GA
  • Our patients complain when we aren’t open and how dare we close?!? —— Jill Sweig, OD, Oyster Bay Optics, Oyster Bay, NY
  • Office is closed on national holidays, but stays open when I take vacation. I give paid days to opticians when I’m on vacation. Office stays open so we can still fill outside Rx, deliver Rxs, and make appointments. —— Texas L. Smith, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • No, we are a very busy practice and have many walk-ins for the optical. We don’t want to lose those sales. —— Jade Kowalick, Rophie Eye Care, Dunedin, FL
  • Only a day or maybe two, depending on how the days fall. —— Susie Phillips, Dr. Brendon Johnson, OD, Pekin, IL
  • We don’t but are considering it. —— Diana Canto-Sims, Buena Vista Optical Boutique, Chicago, IL
  • We like to be able to service the patients as they have the extended time off, we can capture that. —— Jessica Brundidge , Clarity Vision, Clayton, NC

Yes: 16%

  • The best time in Florida to take time off is August and September. Took a week off in August for a staycation and went to the Keys in September. —— Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL
  • It’s a very close family, God-centered business and most of the employees travel to their families. —— Laura Wright, Upstate Eyecare, Greenville, SC
  • My independent boutique has a different sales rhythm than I observed in clinical opticianry. September and January are great times for me to travel. My clients! —— Elle Tatum, Island Spectacle, Bainbridge Island, WA
  • Usually the week between Christmas and New Year’s. —— Leisa Lauer, Dr. H Michael Shack, Newport Beach, FL
  • Since we are still pretty small, we can close for five days without it affecting business. We tried to limit these days to off-peak season. —— Amina Ebrahim, OD, D Vision Eyecare, Allen, TX
  • We close the day after Thanksgiving and the day after Christmas. That is the extent of our extended closing for holidays.——  Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • Mostly Christmas, but only for a few days. —— Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • We are closed the day after Thanksgiving and Christmas Eve. —— Scott Felten, Fox Valley Family Eye Care, Little Chute, WI
  • The longest stretch of time that we close is during Thanksgiving. We close at noon the Wednesday before and obviously Thanksgiving Day. We stay open on Veteran’s Day so that we can take that “holiday” on Black Friday and are closed straight through to Monday. —— Christine Howard, Attleboro Vision Care, Attleboro, MA
  • Off-season. —— Brian Finley, Island Opticians LLC, Palm Beach, FL
  • I’m the owner/optician/bookkeeper/cleaning lady/lab tech, etc. My patients know I need a break occasionally and respect that. I generally try to schedule during slow months or when school is closed for breaks, when it becomes a ghost town! I also give notice to everyone who orders for two weeks before, as well as advertise. —— Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY
  • We use days that we don’t have a full patient load for housekeeping…reorganizing frame boards, catch up on claim resubmissions, dust, dust, dust, dust. —— Meredith Hall, Miller Family Eye, Cedar Rapids, IA
  • Longer paid holiday breaks allow our employees to de-stress and recharge before insurance season kicks into high gear. It’s good for morale and productivity which has a direct impact on our performance. —— Jesse Ellis , Eye Health Vision Center, North Dartmouth, MA

What’s the Brain Squad?

  • If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

Since launching in 2014, INVISION has won 21 international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact INVISION's editors at editor@invisionmag.com.

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Do You Or Don't You

Cross-Training Staff is the Way Most of You Go, But Some of You Still Say ‘No Thanks’

Most eyecare business owners see value in having staff handle multiple duties.

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Yes: 86%

  • All of my opticians do it all. Kevin Bushouse, RxOptical, Kalamazoo MI
  • Techs can do front desk scheduling when front desk needs vacation time or is out sick. Richard Kemerling, Margolis Vision, Lone Tree, CO
  • I am fortunate to have same team for 12 years and everyone can complete entire process, including cutting lenses. This allows for smooth vacation time or if our lab manager is sick, we can still order and cut the jobs without feeling the impact. Of course, I prefer everyone to keep in their lane so they can be as effective as they can be. Monika Marczak, Eye Candy Optical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • I’ve crossed trained my staff and recently took them to Texas for training but because of the Trump economy, I’ve received two week notices from two of my staff taking higher paying jobs with benefits. Two other local practices are having the same issues keeping staff. Marc Ullman, Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NJ
  • Staff expects and takes more and more absences. That combined with increasing wages to keep good employees require offices to function with fewer staff but still have coverage, so cross training is a must. Zach Dirks, OD, St. Peter Eyecare Center and Belle Plaine Eyecare Center, St. Peter and Belle Plaine, MN
  • We are a small office. All the staff can do everything, but focus on one main task. The front desk reception only stays up front. She is the doctor’s wife and doesn’t want to learn frame dispensing. We just roll our eyes when she says, “she is too old to learn selecting/dispensing.” Allen D. Hoek, OD, Ripon, CA
  • Cross training just worksEdna Shelby, Macomb Vision Associates, Shelby Township, MI
  • We have a team of 12, and inevitably someone is sick or more than one person wants the same day off. Cross training is time-consuming, but it gives us greater flexibility and can also improve service by avoiding long waits for an OCT/photos/dispense/scheduling if someone else can jump in and help on the fly. Sarah Jerome, OD, Look + See Eye Care, Minneapolis, MN
  • Everything is everything. Everybody does all. Steve Whitaker, Whitaker Eye Works, Philadelphia PA
  • In our office, no one person has one job. Every person has the full capacity to do at least two (mostly three jobs). Opticians can file insurance or cut lenses and do repairs/adjustments. Technicians can book appointments, order contacts, scribe and special tests. This ingraftsour family to ensure everyone is and can be helped. If someone is overloaded or absent, the machine still runs. Blake Hutto, OD, Family Vision Care, Alma, GA
  • During busy times in a small office, having an available staff member help a patient is paramount in offering the customer service we strive for. Karen Santos McCloud, OD, Hamburg Vision Center, Lexington, KY
  • We cross-train in numerous ways, but the big one is this: Everyone on our staff is able to fit, measure, dispense, and sell glasses. Jen Heller, Pend Oreille Vision Care, Sandpoint, ID
  • Just being able to jump in to help another department when overwhelmed. Pam Peters, Midwest Eye, Downers Grove, IL
  • It works well when a staff member calls in sick, we are each able to cover for the other. Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • We are a small office. We all do a little bit of everything. I actually want to strengthen our cross training even more. There are a lot of things I do that no one else knows how to do, and if I got hit by a bus it could get tough! Jenna Gilbertson, McCulley Optix Gallery, Fargo, ND
  • I have a small staff so a certain amount of cross training is necessary. Expertise is still required in your given title and I like to be able to train a specific person on their specific position so we can grow and take care of our patients the best way possible. Shimul Shah, OD, Marysville Family Vision, Marysville, OH
  • With cross-trained staff, we can stay open during lunch time for pick-ups and new orders. Our opticians can run the front desk and our administrative staff can handle small repairs and orders. It isn’t always seamless, but hopefully our patients can appreciate our service. Angie Patteson, OD, Sunset Eye Care, PC, Johnson City, TN
  • What I tell our staff is that no one person is better than anyone else. We train all our staff to have the ability to do every day to day task needed to keep the patients and our practice happy. No one person is too good to take out trash or clean, or pre-test or educate a patient on what frame looks and fits the prescription best. All members of the team can advise a patient the reason behind the need for a particular product. It makes it so our patients have less of a wait time and a better overall experience! William Chancellor, Eye Can See Eyewear, McDonough, GA
  • We do personality and skill testing first to determine if they are a good fit to cross train in that specific department (scribe, stylist optician, claim processor, lab tech, etc.) We use tests like Myer-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), DISC, The Birkman Method, Wealth Dynamics and Sally Hoghead’s Fascinate (we learned about this one at the Transitions Academy in 2016. She was the guest speaker.) We do invest in these tests but some are free. We find this helps train them more efficiently and we know ahead of time if the task or skill they need to learn is congruent with their zone of genius. Diana Sims, Buena Vista Optical, Chicago, IL
  • Because we are an independent practice with seven staff members, cross training is vital when we are missing staff due to vacation, illness, staff leaving, etc. Angel Miller, Cynthiana Vision Center, Cynthiana, KY
  • All of our staff are cross-trained. We’re a new and very small office. So, all of our staff are trained in every department (optical, contact lens, welcome area, etc.) This way if one of the two employees need a day off, the other can pitch in and not a lose a beat. Shane Clark, Infinity EyeCare, Rapid City, SD
  • We have a small office with three employees. Everyone knows how to pre-test and check-out patients. That’s usually where our bottlenecks occur. Danielle Jackson, OD, Jackson Eye, Fairburn, GA
  • Front desk with insurance, OD tech with optical department. John LaShorne, Brown County Eye Care, Nashville, IN
  • We are a small three-person office so if anyone wants to go on vacation everyone has to be cross trained. We Have an employee follow one of us around for a couple weeks until they can do ok with the new job and then have them fill in every once in a while to keep up the skills. Tammy Hazelett, Wylie Vision Care, Garland, TX
  • We try and teach most employees several parts of the business. For example, our opticians can be our techs as well. Stacey Korte, Rockford Family Eyecare, Rockford, MI
  • It has worked well in all aspects; we are a small office and it is vital that everyone can help in all areas. Stephanie Crowley, Sie Eyecare, Charlotte, NC
  • Smaller practice’s need to be flexible so everyone jumps in when needed. Heather Nagucki, Brodie optometry, Perrysburg, OH
  • We currently have one front desk/receptionist that is cross trained for the tech position, another front desk/receptionist that is also trained as an optician, and a tech who is trained as an optician. Jason Stamper, Eye Care Pavilion, Davenport, IA
  • It really helps cover all aspects of the business during vacation time; anyone can rotate where needed. Kathy Maren, Comb EyeCare & Eyewear, Western Springs, IL
  • At any given point, someone in our office could be busy. This shouldn’t mean that a patient can’t be helped. As a result, we believe in everyone knowing a decent amount of each part of everyone’s job. That way, even if there are some things that can’t be addressed immediately, at least the patient feels as though they are a priority and being attended to. Christine Howard, Attleboro Vision Care, Attleboro, MA
  • Everyone needs to know how to work the front, cut lenses, do lab duties (clean, check, call work, neutralize lenses.) Dorothy Reynolds, Optical Alternatives, Milford, CT
  • Helps. Needful at times. Appreciation of others. T.S. Stephens, OD, Dr. Stephens and Associates, Vienna, WV
  • We try because in this day and age people are gone more and call in more. Likewise it is less affordable to have extra staff so having staff who can cover vital areas at times or on days that the office is short is imperative. Zachary Dirks, St. Peter and Belle Plaine Eyecare Centers, Saint Peter, MN
  • I have five employees: All five can dispense, sell, answer phones, schedule appointments, calculate and bill insurance. One is office manager also. Two of those are CL technicians. One is clerical, although two more are able when she’s out. All trained from the beginning, then then shifted to where their strength lies for the majority of the day. Dave Schultz, OD, Urban Optics, San Luis Obispo, CA
  • We’re a small practice so I personally pre-test patients, order glasses and CLs, adjust and repair frames, bill insurances, sell product, edge lenses in house, answer phones making appointments and I’m all worn out just talking about it. Jeff Grosekemper, Casa De Oro Eyecare, Spring Valley, CA
  • Telephone conversations, problem patients, training new staff, problem solving. BJ Chambers, Carrera Optical, McQueeney, TX
  • While we do believe in having expertise in specific disciplines for each person, it is important to provide basic training so each person knows a little about each other’s responsibilities. This helps in that: (1) In the event that a person is away another can provide some assistance in a person absence. (2) Team begins to respect the expertise each team member has by knowing “hands on” what another person does. Steve Nelson, Eye Candy Optical, Westlake, OH
  • All employees are trained on the phones to schedule appointments and take contact lens orders. This works well because if someone calls, they’re not put on hold. We’ve tried to train the front desk staff to do basic repairs but hasn’t worked well because opportunities are few and far between so they forget how or run into a situation they haven’t been trained on and still need to wait on an optician. Caitlin Bruno, Binyon Vision Center, Bellingham, WA
  • While most of our paperwork (recalls, insurance and patient registration) is electronic, pre-testing, OCT, Fundus, Fields and eyewear selection are performed by whoever is available. Eyewear measurements still require an optician. Dave Goodrich, Goodrich Optical, Lansing, MI
  • Front desk can do dispensing and price with insurances. Tech can do dispensing and show frames optician does all. Betty Aretz, The Eyecare Boutique, Wexford, PA
  • I wouldn’t ask you to do anything that I wouldn’t do. Jill Sweig, OD, Oyster Bay Optics, Oyster Bay, NY
  • Too small of an office to just have people special in one area. Jeff Hayden, Vision Care Center, Brighton, MI
  • Opticians answer phones and do check out. Jill Schnurer, Village Eyecare Co., Clarkston, MI
  • I only have two staff members. They have to be able to do each other’s jobs if necessary. Kimberly Riggs OD, Ligonier, PA
  • Cross-training our optometric technician in the matters of insurance eligibility, types of lenses, frame adjustments, etc. It allows her to fill in where necessary if a co-worker is ill or if our office is very busy. Cassandra Nash, HD Optical Express, Lansing, MI
  • Just in case someone’s on vacation or sick. Larry Wiggins, UseeMe, Rockville, MD
  • I am a one-person operation so I have to know how to do everything! Julie Uram, Optical Oasis, Jupiter, FL
  • We’re a small office so it’s a necessity. Rick Rickgauer, Vision Associates, Girard, PA
  • In a small office (six staff) we have to cross train because when staff go on vacation or sick, they have to be able to fill in different job titles. Scott Keating, OD, Vision Trends, Dover, OH
  • My scribe can tech and my tech’s can scribe. Everyone in the office can answer the phone, schedule appointments and answer general questions. We are a small office so cross-training is essential. Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision, Edmond, OK
  • Opticians can pre-test our patients as well as answer phones and make appointments if needed. Theodore Sees, OD, Rockford Family Eyecare, Rockford, MI
  • Two licensed opticians do everything. Front desk can also prescreen patients and occasionally will deliver an Rx if needed. Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • Our staff can run the front desk, work up patients frame style and adjust frames. Our intern also learns these important procedures. Robert M Easton, Jr., OD, Oakland Park, FL
  • Sales should know data entry and select staff is chosen for duties like ordering frames/lenses and insurance submission. We will see who’s able to be cross trained to do particular side work. Kaleena Ma, MK Vision Center, Forest Hills, NY
  • I have my office manager work on occasion in the vision therapy arena. There are times where my vision therapist has taken over some office clerical duties. Everyone works the optical area. Pauline Buck, OD, Behavioral and Developmental Optometrists, Miami, FL
  • We are a small five-person staff (plus 1 doctor) office and so being able to be out front, do auxiliary testing, and work with issues on glasses is essential to our success. Bridgett Fredrickson, Whelan Eye Care, Bemidji, MN
  • We train our clinical staff to help patient select eyewear. They establish a rapport during the exam process and we feel it translates nicely for when the patient is picking out eyewear. Vlad Cordero, Focus Eye Care PC, Hackensack, NJ
  • All of my employees are cross-trained. I can’t imagine it working any other way. As a small business owner knowing that I am covered if there is a call-off or vacation time puts my mind at ease. Each employee still has the thing that they are MOST responsible for, but each can pre-test, schedule, sell, and edge lenses. And I, as the doc, can also do ANY job at my office. Cynthia Sayers, OD, EyeShop Optical Center, Lewis Center, OH

 

N0: 14%

  • I’m a one-man shop. Kevin Count, Prentice Lab, Glenview, IL
  • It’s me (owner/optician) and a part time secretary. I’m a control freak so I have slowly let her do insurance billing, a little selling, and paperwork but I do the bookkeeping, edging, repairs, selling, adjustments. Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY
  • I think this would be a good idea but the size of our company makes it hard for a person to learn and retain that much. Smaller locations of ours we have started to try this and it has been helpful. Jocelyn Mylott, D’Ambrosio Eye Care, Lancaster, MA
  • We are understaffed and there is no time to cross-train. I help out when needed, but can only do so much. Frances Ann Layton, Eye Associates of South Georgia, Valdosta, GA
  • New staff needs to be trained first before we cross train. Pablo E Mercado, Mount Vernon Eyecare, Dunwoody, GA

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

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Do You Or Don't You

Do You or Don’t You Belong to Any Community or (Small) Business Organizations?

More than half of you are members.

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Yes: 52%

  • We belong to the local Chamber of Commerce and sponsor a local cycling team. A shared passion for cycling between our office and our patients has created some really unique marketing opportunities and given us a lot of word-of-mouth business. Sometimes, thinking outside the usual business affiliations can pay off in big ways.  — Becky Furuta, Avenue Vision, Golden, CO
  • Zwin, a women in business networking group. They are all extremely supportive of each other’s business. I just joined and many of them have already become patients.  — Nytarsha Thomas, OD, Visionelle Eyecare, Zionsville, IN
  • BNI. We have gotten referrals and business leads through this.  — Stacey Korte, Rockford Family Eyecare, Rockford, MI
  • 440 Junction in the Tech Tech Building of Detroit, a fellow entrepreneurs network.  — Will Taylor, Eye 2 Eye Contact, Northville, MI
  • Rotary, lots of members have become patients.  — Kenneth D. Boltz, OD, Dublin, OH
  • Highlands Commerce Guild, Louisville Independent Business Association. It is a good way to get to know our neighbors and the concerns that other local business owners have. Also, great networking, I have gotten multiple exams from members and them recommending us to others.  — Michael Martorana, OD, Falls City Eye Care, Louisville, KY
  • Our local Chamber of Commerce really supports small businesses. They promote our business in every community event, online, and acts as a support group for entrepreneurs.  — Leah Johnson, Central Texas Eye Center, San Marcos, TX
  • Stars Networking, we get a lot of patients that were referred by members.  — Amy Pelak, Proview Eyecare Optometry, Corona, CA
  • Local historic society. Lions Club. Always brings in a few new patients but only a small percentage. Belong more as a service to the community rather than hoping for lots of new patients.  — Scott Keating, OD, Vision Trends, Dover, OH
  • Junior League. The referrals are amazing from the relationships I have created!  — Katie McElvaine, OD, Springfield Family Vision, Springfield, MO
  • Rotary for 36 years, past president. Many Rotarians see me for eyecare. Commerce Club for three years.; it’s a business referral group and most of the members see me for eyecare.  — Robert M Easton, Jr., OD, FAAO, Oakland Park, FL
  • BNI because it requires members to give qualified referrals.  — Kaleena Ma, MK Vision Center, Forest Hills, NY
  • Chamber of Commerce, Rotary, and Small Business Council. I like being involved in my community and want to contribute any way I can.  — Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision, Edmond, OK
  • Rotary Club, Local and County Chamber of Commerce, School Sports & Band Booster. The Chamber of Commerce offers so much to promote local business. They also offer courses on business topics, such as social media, local tax laws, advertisement, and buying trends in the area. They do a huge amount of online and print advertising for their members as well.  — Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY
  • We started a local business association for our 15-block business district. We had a festival in July.  — Cindy Seemann, Design Vision Optical, Wauwatosa, WI
  • Chamber of Commerce, Rotary and Lions Club. Never joined to get patients, joined to serve the community. The more you serve, the patients become a byproduct of service.  — Texas L. Smith, OD, Dr. Texas L. Smith & Associates, Citrus Heights, CA

No: 48%

  • I am still looking for one that fits both my schedule and what I am looking for.  — Lee Dodge, OD, Visualeyes Optometry, Sherman Oaks, CA
  • I think it may have been a poor decision to not join business organizations because after 20 years I’ve finally figured out there is a lot of money lost by just being the doctor and not managing my business.  — Marc Ullman, OD, Academy Vision, Pine Beach, NJ
  • I am not working at a brick and mortar office at the present time.  — Martha Davenport, Safe Vision, Wheatfield, IN
  • I do not have the time for it.  — Michael Davis, OD, Opti-Care, Eldersburg, MD
  • Our doc isn’t even a member of the AOA, so I don’t see him getting involved with something smaller.  — Josh Bladh, Dr. Bladh OD, Diamond Bar, CA
  •  

    What’s the Brain Squad?

    If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. eyecare business serving the public, you’re invited to join the INVISION Brain Squad. By taking one five-minute quiz a month, you can get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting eyecare professionals. Good deal, right? Sign up here.

Continue Reading

Do You Or Don't You

54% of You Like the Flexibility of Part-Timers. The Rest Don’t Think They’re Worth the Investment

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THIS MONTH’S QUESTION:  Do you hire part-time employees?

Yes: 54%

  • Only have one part time employee, she went from FT to PT, she otherwise would have quit. Happy to have her still with the team as she knows our POS and can help as needed. — Katie Kelly, Ochsner Vision Center, New Orleans, LA
  • These are prior employees that cover during vacations or employees on sick leave. — Dr. Texas Smith, Dr. Texas Smith and Associates, Citrus Heights, CA
  • It’s always nice to have a flexible part time employee who is available to fill in. — Hanna Cook, Urban Optics, San Luis Obispo, CA 
  • More flexibility with scheduling. — Ann Gallagher, Professional Vision of Ellicott City, Ellicott City, MD
  • Our finishing lab tech is part-time, but he’s year-round. — Frances Ann Layton, Optical Associates of South Georgia, Valdosta, GA
  • I hire what I need for the business, sometimes I just don’t need a full-time person for certain activities. — Selina McGee, OD, Precision Vision of Edmond, Edmond, OK
  • As it fits our needs. We currently have an optician who has been part-time for almost 2 years working mornings. His presence keeps things flowing. With an extra optician, we can keep up with work, patient flow, and sales in the morning. — Dawn Christman Munoz, North Valley Eye Medical Group, Mission Hills, CA
  • Our part-timer works during our peak hours; Saturday and during the lunch hour. — Stephanie Kuhn, Optique Vision Center, Edmond, OK
  • I like the flexibility of a part-timer. Plus, in order to put on a full-timer, insurance and 401k benefits kick in, so if we are just needing help during busy periods, it makes better sense to have a part-timer. — Jim Williams, Eye to Eye Optometry, Mexico, MO
  • Part-time works well to supplement staff in absences or simply to do busy work, the non-patient related tasks. We have also hired pre-optometry students interested in gaining insight into the practice. The tasks assigned to them allow flexibility with their schedules. They do eyewear final inspection, patient notifications, inventory and data entry.  — Pam Housley, Texas State Optical of Nederland, Port Arthur, TX
  • We do it all year-round to keep our schedule flexible. — Vlad Cordero, Focus Eye Care PC, Hackensack, NJ
  • I typically reserve part time status to students. We make a point to try to offer an opportunity to kids wishing to see what working in a health care field is like and for some those shining stars which have a penchant for service. I typically prefer the majority of my team is full-time. I feel like my support of them through their salary, benefits and opportunities for learning are better appreciated by a full-timer. — Ted McElroy, Ted A. McElroy OD, Vision Source Tifton, Tifton, GA
  • Year around. To fill in on our busier days and events. — Paula Hornbeck, Eye Candy & Eye Candy Kids, Delafield, WI
  • Only to fill periods of high volume. — Leisa Lauer, Westcliff Optometry, Newport Beach, FL
  • They provide coverage year-round when needed and it helps keep good employees that can’t work full time due to other commitments. Better some hours then none. — Jill Sweig, OD, Oyster Bay Optics, Oyster Bay, NY
  • We keep a part-time college student on staff, normally a pre-optometry student to help with clerical tasks: filing invoices, marking glasses orders as dispensed in EMR. —  Caitlin Bruno, Binyon Vision Center, Bellingham, WA
  • Year round. Fills in times of the day that are busier than others. Makes it easy to have someone to fill in when one of the staff is sick or on vacation, the part time staff will take extra hours. — Michael Davis, OD, Opti-Care, Eldersburg, MD
  • Year-round. Mature workers don’t want full-time usually. They have other interests and often don’t need the money. — Cindy Henderson, Eyear Optical, Hixson, TN
  • We do not need to give benefits and they work for us when it is busy (ex: weekends, during busy hours like when customers get home from work). — Kaleena Ma, MK Vision Center, Forest Hills, NY
  • We have a staff member that has been part time for 3+ years, it proves to be very valuable to cover when other staff needs to be gone. — Bridgett Fredrickson, Whelan Eye Care, Bemidji, MN
  • Your round. Our office is open 56 hours a week. Therefore, we have a combination of full-time and part -time employees. We have found that it works great to give employees flexible hours! — Theodore Sees, OD, Rockford Family Eyecare, Rockford, MI
  • Year-round, some people only want part-time responsibility so we’re happy to fulfill that need. It’s mostly mothers who used to work for us before they had children and now that they’re in school, they just want something a couple days per week. — Josh Bladh, Dr Bladh OD, Diamond Bar, CA
  • We work with employee schedules for schooling, etc. — Dave Goodrich, Goodrich Optical, Lansing, MI
  • I had made it a point to hire interns who are part-time to give them exposure to the profession and patient contact. They are usually younger individuals who are still in school and deciding on their future. — Pauline Buck, OD, Behavioral and Developmental Optometrists, Miami, FL
  • Less business cost. — Jeff Hayden, Vision Care Center, Brighton, MI
  • I am looking to hire a part-timer especially for front office functions. The way we alternate our doctor days, it would be a great benefit to have someone to work our busier office on non-doctor days to do administrative work. — William Chancellor, Eye Can See Eyewear, McDonough, GA
  • Year-round. We are close to a major university and used to hire students seasonally, but there is too much training involved to take someone on part-time and seasonally. Many of my employees are not interested in working full-time. — Sarah Jerome, OD, Look+See Eye Care, Minneapolis, MN
  • I only have one employee and she comes in when I need her and goes when we’re done. We have a great working relationship. She’s retired so she’s very flexible. She’s here to help make the business successful and with the extra money goes on vacations. — Jennifer Leuzzi, Mill Creek Optical, Dansville, NY
  • We have several part time employees that are great! They work year-round and help fill in the gaps each week and are a great benefit when full time staff members take time off. — Ken Boltz, Kenneth D Boltz OD, Dublin, OH

No: 46%

  • Quite frankly, I never thought about it but this is making me think twice. — Monika Marczak, OD, Eye Candy Optical Center, McMurray, PA
  • I have a small practice and everyone needs to be cross trained. I believe it is inefficient to properly train someone who will only be there part time. Well trained full time staff can handle even the busiest times. — Karen Santos McCloud, OD, Hamburg Vision Center, Lexington, KY
  • It takes too much time to train them for it to be worthwhile. — Chani Miller, OD, Highland Park, NJ
  • With so many considerations in glasses, we feel a full-time employee is able to have up-to-date ideas to present to the customer. — Mickey Bradley, Patrick Optical, Fort Worth, TX
  • It’s difficult to get the same level of commitment out of a part time employee. — Steve Nelson, Eye Candy Optical, Westlake and Beachwood, OH
  • Because we are not a part-time practice. — Penn Moody, OD, Moody Eyes, Indianapolis, IN
  • Better luck with full time. — Robert McBeath, Edina Eye Physicians and Surgeons, Edina MN
  • We have a very dependable team and they are all full-time employees. We do have one employee that is a student at the local University that works part time during the school year. — Susan Frein, Ames Eye Care, Ankeny, IA
  • We expect our team members to have the answers for our patients which a part-time employee typically cannot provide in our ever-evolving world. — Michael Dunn, Henry Ford Optimeyes, Troy, MI
  • Up to four locations and we’ve had turn over, we need full-time with experience. — Steve Boydte, Performance EyeCare, Swansea, IL
  • Occasionally, usually at the employee request. We like to offer at least 30 hours so they qualify for benefits.  — Erin Pillsbury, Shasta Eye Medical Group, Redding, CA
  • Having been a part-time employee in the past, I know that it’s difficult to juggle multiple schedules (which is usually the reason someone accepts a part-time job: other commitments); it’s more difficult to keep employees fully trained and fully aware of what’s going on in the office; and motivated. — Jen Heller, Pend Oreille Vision Care, Sandpoint, ID
  • It takes a while to train someone to do things the way you want them done. A part time associate is not as invested. — Michelle Wright, DePoe Eye Center, Sharpsburg, GA
  • There isn’t enough payoff for the time and effort it takes to train part-time staff in our office. — Katie Root, Latham Family Vision, Latham, NY
  • Our staff is just right! — Kimberly Scully, Lodestar Family Eye Care, Palmer, AK
  • We are only open 35 hours/week and want folks that are able to make it a priority to be here. That being said, if you have been with us a while, missing an hour here and there for a class is always accommodated. — Katie McElvaine, OD, Springfield Family Vision, Springfield, MO
  • We have 4 full-timers and there isn’t a need for part-timers. However, three of the current full-timers were part-timers at one point. It’s primarily based on need. — Christine Howard, Attleboro Vision Care, Attleboro, MA
 

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