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Frame and Lens Selection to Help People See and Look Their Best

Work to understand the client’s lifestyle in order to get them eyewear that they’ll love.

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AS OPTICIANS, we spend a lot of time talking to clients about individual eyewear needs. Understanding the customer’s lifestyle and figuring out their desired look helps with our choice of frame and lens selection. Recently, I had a patient in her mid-20s who showed signs of light sensitivity and was adamant that her glasses express her personality and style. She explained she’d never really been happy with her glasses. Her prescription was a -6.00SPH in both eyes, and she did not want the thickness of the lenses to show. She also hated the heaviness of large frames but did not want small frames. I wasn’t frustrated; this is my favorite type of patient! Here I saw an opportunity to boldly express this young woman’s style not just in the frame selection, but in her lens choice as well. Lucky for her, this year we are seeing tinted lenses come back into fashion, and I think using lens tints is a great way to create a conversation piece for your customers.

After looking at many options, we surprisingly chose the new ic! Berlin Bise frame in Sillenipink. I know: Why would I choose such a large frame, knowing that her lenses are going to show—exactly what she doesn’t want? Here is where I had to use my skills both as an optician and a stylist to build her trust. I explained that the frames I’d selected were super light, durable and comfortable, but also very fashion forward. Also, because her PD and OC were centered in the frame, the all-around lens thickness would be balanced. It’s important to communicate to patients how the technical choices we make as opticians translate into what they want for their lifestyle.

Since this young woman had light sensitivity, during lens selection, I then had an opportunity to talk to her about a special tinted lens that has been tested just for that: the FL41 lens. She declined that, along with Transitions; however, that did not stop me from customizing a lens that would work for her. Since her main concern at this point was the edge thickness I decided to talk to her about edge tints and how they create a fun, colored ‘glow’ around the frame, taking the attention off the lens thickness and making it about the hue as it reflects on the lenses. In combination, we chose a digital high index 1.67 lens with Zeiss DuraVision BlueProtect with a pink edge tint. When she left my office, she was excited and confident with the choices we’d made together. When she came to pick up her glasses, she was pleased with the results and overall experience. I was elated to have been part of the process in finding her first pair of glasses that she was truly happy with.

It’s our job to make customers happy. We are helping people see and look their best. Every day is a new opportunity to select distinctive frames and lenses that create a conversation and make others ask, ‘’What type of lenses are those?’’ In doing this you create a fun, experimental experience with your customer, and they will be as excited as you are with the result. In 2018 and beyond, eyewear styles are going to constantly change and recycle. Let’s create some amazing lenses that will be remembered!

Autianna Wilson is an optician and blogger for opticalgoddesslife.com. She is recognizable on Instagram for her glasses selfies and eclectic style. She aims to promote independent, trendy eyewear with her uncensored honest opinions. Follow her on Instagram @goddessofoptix

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Six Ways to Make Your Patient Experience Memorable

It’s all about hitting them in the feels.

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WHEN YOU THINK OF memorable experiences you tend to remember the times that you felt something. Creating a memorable patient experience is no different! Here are some ways to be memorable:

Active Listening

Pay attention to the patient from the moment they call for an appointment. Train your staff to take notes during this initial touch point and ask questions to understand what type of experience they are seeking. Once the patient is in your exam chair, you’ll have a “blueprint” of their expectations and can address the pain points that brought them in. Face them when they are talking and maintain eye contact.

Doctor Driven Dispensing

Whether you’re an owner or employee, doctor driven dispensing creates a memorable experience and drives loyalty through patient education of products. The clinical findings from the examination should be aligned with all the products you recommend and prescribe. You are the authoritative voice and experienced professional of the office; educate patients on why you are recommending a product and how it’s different from online retailers.

Storytelling

Storytelling can be an influential connector to your patients because it’s an emotional driver and memorable moments are created by emotions. It makes the patient experience a human experience. Be authentic.
Letting them know that your family member has the same issues with progressive lenses and what specific product you prescribed to solve it creates more value for your office than competing on price.

Market Memories

Online retailers like Warby Parker will donate a pair of glasses. It creates a memorable experience for the patient because they know that their purchase will help others. Whether it’s a local charity event or mission trip, your office can do the same. Use your email database and social media platforms to educate your patients about your involvement in the community.

Follow Up

The patient experience does not end with the exam. Making a follow up call to a patient can make a lasting impression and has more impact than you think in developing the critical doctor/patient relationship. Set reminders in your EMR system to have your staff follow up one week, one month or six months on progressive adaptation or overall satisfaction with service or products. Document personal information — job information, children’s names, etc. — in their chart and mention it in your next exam.

Be Unique

Your unique style makes you memorable. Humor is a memorable factor. Don’t be afraid to have a different approach to patient care; humor will make you likeable and approachable to new patients. You want patients to feel comfortable; being funny is one way to do it. Your personality, humor, empathy, and attention to detail are your signature to the world.
It speaks volumes; use it to create a memorable experience that no one can mimic because your “you” is unique.

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John Marvin

Introducing Amazon Eyecare and Eyewear

Relax, it’s not happening… yet. But there is a lot we could learn from their use of behavioral data.

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IN MY EXPERIENCE, the most frequent Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that eye doctors use are: 1) How much is today’s deposit? And 2) How many appointments are on the books for tomorrow?

It may seem simplistic, but many people reading this article will agree, it’s a ritual many eye doctors go through at the end of every work day. It’s a good start, but far from enough to perform with a competitive edge.

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We live in a marketplace driven by data. In our industry, there are courses at major conferences to teach ECPs the KPIs they should measure and manage and how often. Our practice management software can produce countless reports. It can be overwhelming, not to mention time consuming, to keep up with all of the information being produced.

But in eyecare and eyewear’s ever-changing environment, the effective use of data will be the difference between success and irrelevance. We must move from transactional data to behavioral data.

For decades, we’ve used transactional data —measuring what happened in the past — instead of using that data to tell us what we need to do to increase sales and service delivery tomorrow. But with a profession populated in large measure with small independent business people, it is difficult to build, much less afford the type of data systems needed to compete in today’s marketplace.

At a conference I recently attended, the question was posed, “What if you woke this morning to read that Amazon had announced they are going to invest big in the delivery of eyecare services and eyewear before the end of 2019, what would you do?” It is a very good, and not wholly unreasonable, question.

I think the reason people fear Amazon’s entry into our profession is that we know how good they are at competing. We know how much we like using them and how intimidating they are to anyone who has to compete with them … just ask Walmart.

Amazon’s real power is their use of both transactional and behavioral data. Have you ever purchased something from Amazon and for the next two weeks, everywhere you go on the web there are ads associated with what you just purchased? They studied purchasing behaviors and know that a majority of people who buy X will also buy Y if given the opportunity. They are using historical data to predict future purchasing.

With an online analytic program for the independent ECP, we could begin to understand what happened in the past and think about how to use that to impact the future. For example, if you knew a significant percentage of patients who purchased two or four boxes of contact lenses at exam purchased additional boxes within six months, then you could communicate with those patients right when they are most likely to repurchase.

However, this requires new capabilities in data collection, new tools and software for analyzing this information, and most importantly, a new way of thinking about the information being created in our businesses.

The future is not coming, it is here and those who are willing to think differently today will be the ones who will be relevant tomorrow.

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Robert Bell

Don’t Just Ask Questions, Actually Listen to the Answers

Sounds simple, but many don’t do it when trying to sell eyewear.

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A LONG TIME AGO, I overheard a conversation between two people:

Person 1: “Ugh, I just wish there was a magic potion you could drink to lose weight!”

Person 2: “There is. It’s called water.”

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Makes me laugh, every time, because of its sheer simplicity. Anytime I put myself on a weight loss plan, drinking lots of water a day is on the regimen. Simple, right? Well, yes and no. The not so simple part is actually doing it. To drink all that water per day (… hold on, I gotta go refill my water bottle…) isn’t easy. It is, however, very doable.

Well, it’s the same thing with selling.

There isn’t a magic potion for selling (trust me, I’ve drunk a lot of red wine just to be sure) but there is a magic wand. Know what it is? Listening. I mean really listening! The best salespeople I ever meet, in any industry, are always, hands-down, the best listeners. Simple, right? Well, yes and no. The hard part is doing it. I’ll share with you how to make that easier.

One of the nicest compliments I’ve ever received was from one of my first clients, Dr. Robert Ratzlaff of RealEyes in Taos, NM. About a month after his EyeCoach training, he told me I had made him a better doctor. Hmm, strange I thought. I’m not a doctor nor did I attend optometry school.

“Doctor, how the hell did I do that?”

“By making me a better listener.”

“Ah, and how did I make you a better listener?”

“By teaching me to ask better questions. It forces me to listen to the answers.”

It forces me to listen to the answers.

If you’ve read my sales columns before, you know I’m all about the questions. The more questions, the better. The questions I ask have a “share with me” or a “tell me” element to them. Meaning, with each question I ask, I could have “Tell me” or “Share with me” as a preface. It implies we’re on the same team. It says, “Look, I’m not trying to persuade you, I’m trying to find out exactly how I can help you.”

“Tell me… when you’re reviewing your children’s homework, do you notice you’re moving the paper further away to read it?”

“Share with me… what’s happening with your eyes and vision when you’re at your daughter’s soccer games in the late afternoon? Just how harsh is that sun?”

“Tell me… how often is the baby grabbing the glasses off your face?”

“Share with me… how often are you rubbing your eyes and exactly what part of the day do you start to feel most fatigued?”

Wait for the answers. Don’t interrupt them, ever! When they’re done responding, ask another question until you have all the information you require to help them purchase all the eyewear they need.

I tend to nod my head up and down while they’re responding. Why? For me, it actually feels good and reminds me that I’m an active participant in this conversation. For them, it shows them I’m being an active listener and I care about what they’re talking about.

Listening. What a concept!

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